The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: scope and implications

29 Feb - 25 Mar 2016
Go back to 2016 ECOSOC discussion – Implementing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development
  • How can the guiding principle of 'Leave no one behind' be put into practice in implementing the 2030 Agenda in different development contexts (e.g. least developed countries, middle-income countries, high-income countries, fragile states etc.)?
  • At the international level, what are challenges to ensuring policy coherence for sustainable development? What are some examples of best practice and/or who are the "trail blazers" leading the way to improved coherence?
  • How could the UN development system provide coordinated and integrated support for the achievement of the 2030 Agenda?

 

Moderator's Message

Welcome to the discussion on Thematic Window I: “The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: scope and implications”. The discussion starts today and will continue until 25 March 2016.

As you know, the historic 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development was adopted at the United Nations Sustainable Development Summit in September 2015. Leaders from around the world unanimously adopted a holistic, universal, transformative, 15-year global plan of action to end poverty, reduce inequalities and protect our planet.

This new Agenda cannot succeed without the firm commitments of all countries and all stakeholders. Now is the time to roll up our sleeves and begin the difficult task of figuring out how to implement the new Agenda.

One of the main features of the 2030 Agenda is that it is universal. That means that it applies to all countries, developed and developing, low, middle and high-income countries. This makes the task of identifying the right implementing tools and policies ever more complex, as different countries will have differing capacities, priorities and starting points. How do we carry on the unfinished business of poverty eradication and the MDGs and ensure that no one is left behind?

We are certain to encounter challenges to policy coherence at all levels. What do we see as the main challenges to ensuring coherence for sustainable development at the international level? How can we improve policy coherence in the context of a universal agenda through approaches that highlight synergies, trade-offs and the transboundary impacts of domestic policy choices? Strengthening support systems is also an important aspect that we should consider. We need to ensure that the appropriate capacities are built in international and regional institutions, particularly for integrated policy-making.

The UN development system needs to make the necessary adjustments to support Member States to implement the 2030 Agenda and achieve the SDGs. Effective support to implementation will require the UN to deliver as one, bringing together the normative and operational aspects of its work, and to strengthen its capacity to deliver in countries with new and different needs in widely divergent contexts. 

I look forward to hearing your thoughts and ideas and hope that you will share with us your success stories and challenges you are facing in implementing the 2030 Agenda.

Diana Alarcón
Chief, Development Strategy and Policy Unit - DPAD
UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs

Comments (129)

Ranjani K.Murthy

Dear friends

I want to share a 'part' success story pertaining to Goal 5 on Gender Equality the target of economic resources. 

To strengthen property rights of women the Government of Maharashtra, India passed a Resolution 1094/3625/10-08-1994 declaring that every married woman has the right to have an equal share in her husband’s property.  Tejaswini Maharashtra a programme of Women's Development Corporation and International Fund for Agricultural Development launched a ‘Home/Asset of Two’ campaign in 2013 to disseminate information on this resolution. Women and men are made aware that they contribute equally to the household and their vulnerability would be less with assets on joint names. The focus of the campaign has been more on joint registration of houses and agricultural land.  Once the couple comes forward the house or land is registered on joint names.  The outcome of Tejaswini Maharashtra’s joint ownership campaign is given in Table 1 below, which reveals that an impressive 68,166 women have received joint house titles and 12514 have  received joint titles  to agricultural land. The ‘sanction’ rate (vis  a vis application) is higher with regard to securing joint house titles than land titles (see Table 1). Women who now possess joint title deeds feel that their husbands cannot sell the asset without their permission. They cannot ask them to leave the house anymore (happened in a few cases in the past in the village. Another initiative that has been promoted under Tejaswini is obtaining receipts for any jewel that is purchased on the name of women.  Women have started demanding that ration cards (for public distribution system) be made on their names.   Scaling up the initiative of promoting joint property requires a study of achievements and some of the constraints. Some couples who applied got joint title deeds, some had filled the children’s names by mistake in the form. Half the applicants for joint ownership of land are yet to get it. 

 Table 1: Applications and Joint Registration of House and Land: Tejaswini Maharashtra, 2015

House ownership

Land ownership

Proposal  submitted for registration

Joint Registration

Proposal submitted for registration.

Joint Registration

86707

68166 (78%)

26218

12514 (47%)

However, not all rural households have house or land, and the first struggle is to help landless (mainly Daliits) to access land for women directly.   

The Tamil Nadu Dalit Women’s movement  adopted a unique approach to help SC women access land in 19 villages near Thiruvallur district bordering Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh. In these villages five to ten SC women from landless households formed themselves into a sangams, and carried out an informal survey of any porombokku land available for cultivation (other than grazing land and land related to water bodies/channels).  Once they know that such land is available, the women headed to the Village Accounts Officer and PRIs and located the land in the village map. The women then went collectively to the Revenue Inspector for facilitating survey of the land. Some Revenue Inspectors were cooperative (in particular SC women), while others were not and repeated pressure had to be put.  Once the survey was completed the women go to the Taluk Office and meet the Tehsildar asking him/her to allot land and give title deeds on the name of the women. In instances when the Revenue Inspectors or Tehsildar were not co-operative, the women submitted petition to the Collector on Grievance day held every week, as well as in public hearings.  In this manner an impressive 850 SC women from 19 villages in Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh have managed to claim and own dry land of 1-2 acres.   At times false title deeds are issued allotting land which does not exist and the women have to go through similar lines of protest to gain proper titles. More land has been claimed by women on the Andhra side than Tamil Nadu. There is little common land in Tamil Nadu, with common land being used for special economic zones, real estate development, and tourism to a greater extent than in the neighbouring state.    Some of the land was totally uncultivable in the beginning, and boulders had to be removed and shrubs cleared.  In some instances, the SC women farmers have linked with the 100 day employment guarantee which has a provision of paying labourers to develop land of Dalits.  That is, they earn wages for clearing their own land! Right to land, the women claim, has given them economic security, enhanced their social status and reduced domestic violence. 

TO SUM UP INHERITANCE IS ONE ROUTE TO LAND RIGHTS. RIGHTS TO MARITAL PROPERTY IS IMPORTANT (NOT THERE IN MANY COUNTRIES). FOR THE MOST MARGINALISED WOMEN, THEIR HUSBANDS AND PARENTS DO NOT OWN LAND- AND HENCE IT IS IMPORTANT TO SUPPORT WOMEN FOR LAND RIGHTS. THERE NEEDS TO BE RESTRICTIONS ON CONVERSION OF AGRICULTURAL LAND  INDISCRIMINATELY FOR OTHER PURPOSES IF WOMEN ARE TO HAVE CONTROL OVER RESOURCES. 

Olugbenga Odukoya • Executive Director at Peace and Life Enhancement Initiative International from Nigeria

The agenda should be all inclusive. sustaining development is not a task for governemnt only, the process should be participatory. From Developed to developing countries, from key players to common man on the street.

Gwynnyth Llewellyn (not verified)

For the SDG's to truly Leave No One Behind implementation must include people with disabilities including people with mental illness. The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities has raised the level of discussion; local conditions including stigma, fear, prejudice continue to exclude people with disabilities and their families from society. Considering those most excluded first offers promise for including all.

Rosemary KALAPURAKAL • Deputy Director at UNDP

I love the intervention on disability, above.  When we think of MICs, averages mask those who are truly being left behind. The SDGs offer a legitimate entry point to focus the lens squarely on those groups who have been and are being left behind, with the commitment to start with those groups.  As part of the UN team thinking through the kind of interventions we can have as individual agencies and as a system, it would be critical to get a sense of the gaps that we can help address, and especially good examples that we can study further, profile and share with others. 

ozzeir khan (not verified)

To achieve success with regards to the SDGs ofcourse leave no one behind is the right mind set. I wonder if we said take every one forward if the meaning changes. In todays age, technology enables reaching directly to the people  and plays a bigger role by achieving disruptions of the standard ways of progress. In a race against time, ICT for education and development will be a critical factor in the coming years.

HARISH YADAV • Economist at AWAKE SOCIETY from India

The social ,cultural and political conditions are different in Developing and Developed countries.The agenda must be inclusive and related to the cultural conditions of the region with sustainable methods

The Red Elephant Foundation (not verified)

How can the guiding principle of 'Leave no one behind' be put into practice in implementing the 2030 Agenda in different development contexts (e.g. least developed countries, middle-income countries, high-income countries, fragile states etc.)?

- It might be interesting to look at three things. One, technology, where mobile apps and web based tools and apps can be used to collect opinions and ideas in implementing the 2030 Agenda, alongside room for feedback and notes on what works and doesn't. Two, community level engagement through sustainable partnerships with the grass root level organisations and activists. Three, academia - get the schools, universities and colleges into critical thinking and activity to implement the agenda.

At the international level, what are challenges to ensuring policy coherence for sustainable development? What are some examples of best practice and/or who are the "trail blazers" leading the way to improved coherence?

I foresee the lack of many voices being heard at the international level. Policy coherence is possible only if we know who we are speaking to, or who is on the other side and receiving the information we send out. It might help, therefore, to follow a practice of involving grass root initiatives to inform the development of policy so that it is coherent.

How could the UN development system provide coordinated and integrated support for the achievement of the 2030 Agenda?

Stronger civil society partnerships and more working groups - one per agenda will help.

Vimbai Zinyama Mushongera (not verified)

Good Morning

On the principles we need to have indicators that assist in benchmarking the progress which are socially aiented and juxtaposed on the aspects that are known to marginalise persons. like;

 

1. Language- e.g. local words for the development agenda

2. Access to information

3. Vulnerabilities 

4. any other context specific indicators 

Dessalegn Yehuala (not verified)

I think this inititiave, that is, the  the meeting of sustainable goals over 2030 among other things needs a replicable policy template to ensure plicy coherence in different development contexts (e.g. least developed countries, middle-income countries, high-income countries, fragile states etc.).

Tokunbo Lijadu-Oyemade (not verified)

First and foremost, the need for the SDG's implementation to be hollistic, Uiversal, Transformative presupposes that they must impact the entire population and that is where the notion of inclusiveness and "Leave no one behind" most probably emanated from.  I dare repeat the obvious that all nations of the world are at differing levels of development and possibilities of an all inclusive involvement in national development programmes.  In focus here are developing Countries where not all citizens are aware that there was a set of  MDG's now succeeded by the SDG's.  Whereas there are CSO's functioning in these areas with their megre resources and mostly zero assistance from local, state or national governments in these countries.  The CSO's are consequently unable to adequately impact implementation in their catchment areas for lack of resources.  They have continued to function in the area of advocacy only and word of mouth without resources to back them up amount to nothing.

We at KINSAF recently held discussions with the Minister of Agriculture and Rural Development of Nigeria and he has such ambitious programmes in the pipelines and told us of those already being implemented before his own tenure but in that sector, we still discover among our colleagues, absolute ignorance concerning impact and information dissemination on such usefully impactful programmes.  My take is that a strong partnership with CSO's /NGO's operating in sectors covered by Government Ministries, Departments and Agencies [MDA's] must be empowered and given recognition and allowed to carry out implementation of programmes in their areas on behalf of governments [developing countries] This will engender wider coverage  and effectiveness of development programmes including the SDG's.

Stefano Cobello (not verified)

we have to work a lot on learning possibilities. The learning ssystem to fe inlcusive, has to delete the word disable and disabilites. In order to do it, we need to change the learning process paradigma, focusing on the persons possibilites and builiding up a system of learning possibilites.  Education now  is not accesisble to everyone, for a variety of reasons: social, economical, stuctural and environmental. And when education is available it is also  serving the industrial and economical system and not the persons. This creates disable people, cause eveyone is different and something can be accessible for many but not for all. We have to work a lot of on the shifting of perspective from the learning for the system to the learning for the possibilites. 

Fahmida Iqbal Khan (not verified)

In order to achieve sustainable development so that ‘no one is left behind’ can only be achieved if we will be able to tap untapped avenues like private sector, academia, research institutes, technological corporations etc. Human history is evident that whenever inclusiveness and system thinking approach is not ensured or adopted, development didn’t take place and sustainability always remains a big question. We need to come up with innovative and creative methods that can help marginalized, vulnerable and excluded groups and population to become part of dialogues, deliberations, and policy making. We have to come up with something very intelligent that can ensure to end dependency syndrome and help mobilize indigenous knowledge into life transformation experience. While looking into all 17 SDGs and thinking about unfinished agenda of MDGs, I wonder what difference will it make after 30 years if business as usual will continue. So in order to be smart and result oriented, we have to bring fresh indigenous brains and researches into developmental agenda to make it sustainable. 

Sergio (not verified)

At the international level, what are challenges to ensuring policy coherence for sustainable development? What are some examples of best practice and/or who are the "trail blazers" leading the way to improved coherence?The major challenge is to consider that monitoring the SDG targets and reporting progress is just a secondary task. The main task is to facilitate that national and local governments embed the SDGs, the targets and use the derived indicators into their own national policies, strategies and priorities. Then, monitor and reporting becomes just another task (derived of policy implementation). But sadly, at the international level it seems that what we all want is to compare things, for continued or future support (funding especially); and governments in developing countries also expect more financial and technical support, therefore engage themselves in the “monitor and reporting” discussion. The challenge at the international level is how to advocate for and support for innovative pro-SDG policies on the ground beyond the merely monitoring and reporting? How to show that these policies work? How to test them? How could the UN development system provide coordinated and integrated support for the achievement of the 2030 Agenda?For all UN agencies, bodies, programmes and organizations, the SDGs and their targets should be the framework in which all (institutional) strategies need to be aligned. The SDGs and their targets provide a way to deliver on the ground. Therefore, each and every strategy and priority of the UN system agencies needs to converge into respective SDGs/targets, thus avoiding parallel processes that only create bureaucratic burden in the UN and, moreover, to countries (reporting for quasi-similar issues under the SDGs and under specific institutional targets).In essence, to streamline the support from UN agencies and to simplify reporting by countries thereafter.

Paul Shaw (not verified)

The Network of African Youths for Development (NAYD - http;//nayd.org) are developing teams of youth-led CBO's in every country in Africa to 'empower African rural communities with the UN Sustainable Development Goals through youth-led co-ordinated and collaborative information, implementation, monitoring, lobbying and advocacy campaigns'. We presently do not have any template for measuring the baseline or monitoring of the SDGs in the communities. We also have severe communication problems in rural areas of Africa. Will the UN be delivering SDG monitoring templates and will they enhance internet and mobile connectivity in rural areas as a matter of urgency? For those interested in this campaign please read our BLOG at http://sdgs.nayd.org.   

 

Samaila Garba Shiko (not verified)

To achieve SDGs mission and target goals, I think priority should be given to problems that are peculiar to a particular country. In Nigeria, for instance, infrastures (such as good roads, electricty, hospitals & schools), potable water, information and communication technology, poverty and unemployment as well as corruption. All these needs to be addressed. 

Lal Manavado • Senior Advisor at undefined from Norway

Problem of reconciling goals, how to achieve them and what is needed to do so.

 

True, the 17 goals politicians agreed upon represent a significant step towards adopting a holistic approach to mitigating the ignorance, hunger, ill health, insecurity and injustice to which billions are subject today. However, it is only a step towards a very distant goal. It is possible to identify three main reasons for our failure to do much more with much less.

Taking the collection of goals first, they are important, but their selection does not reflect either their logical location in the hierarchy of human needs, nor yet the very obvious fact that the very possibility of human existence is subordinate to that of our environment. Perhaps, the current flood of relevant and irrelevant data has erroded our common sense to that extent we no longer can see the forest for trees.

 

Take for example energy. It is important to people, because its availability  may be necessary for them to satisfy some more important need. For instance, it is less important for a small subsistence farmer than for a factory farmer. There again, we must remember that to the first, farming is necessary to live, while the second uses factory farming to gain some means of exchange to buy most of the things he needs to sustain his life, and  its adverse effects on our habitat are well-known.

 

Now, if one attributes a high value to energy (from non-renewable sources) while its use degrades our habitat and thereby reduces the ecosystem services on which  the salubrity of our climate and the possibility of non-destructive agriculture depends, it is difficult to understand why energy has been given the priority it has among those 17 goals.

 

It may be argued that transport, industry and what is humourously called communication, drive the modern economy, and those activities could not go on at the right pace without energy, therefore, energy is vital. Is it? For whom? Figures from the FAO, WHO, UNESCO, etc., paint a a Hieronymus Bosch landscape of global hunger, disease and ignorance entwined with enormous wealth, incredible consumerism, environmental ruin and supreme indifference to avoidable misery.

 

The modern economy has in fact  led to an increase in the percentage of the deprived in the world. Hence, it is untenable to attribute to energy the value it has been accorded, for it has fuelled the increase in the numbers of deprived through the machinations of economy. The same objection applies to the location of water and some others. I will call this a hierarchical malplacement of goals.

 

Let it be clearly understood that I do not question the values of those 17 goals, rather the sole justifiable source of their values is their actual significance as a necessary condition for us to live as befit civilised people, which does not entail any need for display of consumerism or publicised self-promotion. Other things being equal, this hierarchical value mismatch among goals makes it exceedingly difficult to form congruent policies at international, national, regional and local levels.

 

My apologies on my choice of the term 'congruent' here. It represents in the present context, when all policies of two or more competent authorities are consistent with respect to what they endeavour to achieve by their areas of policy overlap,  their policies will be congruent. For instance, their policies would be hardly congruent if it is the policy of trade ministry to permit making and selling of any industrial human feed  while the health ministry  has a policy to fight NCDs. A brief analysis is sufficient to identify where education, agriculture, etc., policies have areas of overlap with health, and it is not difficult to  achieve a satisfactory congruence, provided that the inimical vested interests do not prevail.

 

Thus, their hierarchical malplacement makes it very difficult to identify and remedy policy incongruence among the policies formed with a view to achieving those 17 goals. This is a logical error, which is open to a simple solution, viz., rather than numbering them, they should be placed in a hierarchical cluster, which would display their actual worth, i.e., how essential are they in  enabling us to live like more or less contented civilised specimens.

 

Other things being equal, how those goals may be attained offers us a fairly wide technical choice. Here, we run into two major obstacles. The first is a nasty side-effect of the hierarchical malplacement of a goal, viz.m, the priority its given in a policy generally reflects its priority in resource allocation during its implementation.  Often, this can lead to a resource depletion  resulting in the under funding or neglect of some more important goals.

 

The second is concerned with the appropriateness of the method chosen to achieve an objective. For instance, more often than not, 'industrialisation' is shoved to the fore as the universal panacea to every ill that plagues the world. It is remarkable that the advocates of industry, which by the way included c. marx and v. i. ualinov alias lenin,  have failed to appreciate the inevitability of social injustice and environmental disaster that process logically entails, for it is not designed to meet a reasonably rising or falling need, but rather to increase the gains of its operators ad libitum by using more and more input resources from a finite pool.

 

A different category of inappropriate methods stems from an uninformed belief in the suitability or the need for certain tools,  desire for prestige, or belief induced by advertising propaganda, incompetence or corruption driven choice. For example, it would be salutory to corelate changes in the rural literacy rate with the increase in the numbr of mobile  electronic devices in use. Likewise, the much-vaunted 'gree revolution' of the 1960-ies that turned  mud-brown ought to be a warning to us all. And, for the love of all civilised values, let us not make education into a production line to feed the demands of 'economy'.

 

 

In this brief scanning of the problem,  let us finally turn to  what resources are needed. Here again, we run into two difficulties. First, the number of sutably skilled people with sufficient motivation and integrity required for this difficult task,  are very unevenly distributed throughout the globe. Moreover, their distribution where they are most needed is rather thin. Little has been done so far to retain them where they are  sorely needed,  and much remains to be done to train and offer them positions commensurable with their ability.

 

I shall conclude with what may seem an insoluble problem, viz., finances.  Let me put it this way. First, calculate the actual global currency  total, perhaps with reference to US dollar, or any other chosen currency. Next, add up the total global debt, writing it off as appropriate, i.e., country A ows a million to country B, but country C owes a million to A. So, we can write the two off! Next, subtract the total debt so obtained from our first value. That is what we really have to spend on everything sans deficit spending.

 

But how much of that currency total is sequestered in private hands? The cake has a finite size, the number of mouths looking for a bite increases, while the share of it in private hands grows, leaving less and less for the rising poor population  to share.

 

Lal Manavado.

 

Quentin Farmar-Bowers (not verified)

The nature of the functioning of government bureaucracies is to break responsibilities into ministries and agencies that tend to be competitive for power and resources.   The nature of most governments is to follow ideologies in policies and be closed to facts, science and new ideas that come from ‘enemies’ of the prevailing ideology used by government.  Most western governments have been steeped in neoliberal ideology over the last 30 – 40 years.  Very often these neoliberal ideas are so entrenched that the politicians, academics commentators and indeed most of the public are unaware that they are working to an ideology often unsupported by fact, experience and science. 

These two factors (agency competition and following an ideology) will make implementing the Sustainable Development Goals difficult for many governments despite their support for individual goals.  

In the past 8 years or so ‘western governments’ have been fixated on the deficit / surplus debate with most government’s decision-makers deciding that a government surplus achieved by austerity is the most important fiscal goal for governments irrespective of the actual financial situation of the nation.   Unless this is changed many of the SDGs that require growth and improved equity and SDGs that require sustainability will be almost impossible to achieve. 

Implementing the SDGs may provide reasoning people with the opportunity to think through the neoliberal ideology and the competitive nature of government agencies to develop a more Earth and people friendly approach for government to take.  This approach need not be a totally new invention as there have been periods in the past when more sympathetic policies were enacted, notably just after the second world war, when many politicians saw a need for employment, prosperity and peace for all.  So we can learn from our own history.

I would like to suggest the following two “Balances” to provide the political / economic conditions for achieving the SDGs.

1)      First Balance: Sovereign Governments (governments that issue their own currency like the UK, USA and Australia and have a floating exchange rate) tend to focus on monetary policy to control their economies although fiscal policy is much more effective.   In fiscal policy the modern tendency is for governments to try and balance taxation receipts with expenditure with a preference for a surplus.  This is instead of managing their economies in a way that uses the resources that exist in the real economy so none of these real resources are lift idle (such as labor).   I would like to suggest that the first point of balance should not be a budgetary balance between government taxation and expenditure but rather a balance between financial management and the real economy.  So fiscal policy becomes a tool to achieve the end, not an end in itself (i.e. achieving a balance or even a surplus should not be a goal for government). The method would be to use all the financial and job creating tools available to the government and the goal would be to ensure the existing resources in the economy are actually used fully.  (Other objectives such as age, gender, and poverty preferences can be added). The underutilized resources would include labor and plant and equipment.   Goals that require people to be skilled and employed would greatly benefit from this change.  And the change would increase economic growth rates by some percentage points providing scope for governments to implement policies to help poor people participate in a growing economy.  Instead of being concerned about running a deficit, governments should be more concerned about leaving people unemployed, unskilled and inexperienced at working.  This balance would go some way immediately to tackling the social aspects of the Sustainable Development Goals.  However, a second balance is needed for the longer term to move the real economy towards sustainability.

2)      Second balance: The first balance would help ensure existing economies start to run at full speed but much of what happens now in the existing real economies are unsustainable socially and environmentally.   The second task for governments would be to balance the real economy with the ability of the Planet to sustain this level of utilization of the Earth’s systems.  The objective of this second balance would be to bring the real economy into balance with the Planet’s physical and ecological systems and balance this level of output with the combined needs of all people (improve intra- and inter-generational equity).  The current un-balance that exists between the real global economy and the ability of the Earth Systems is huge and for some areas, such as climate change and biodiversity maintenance, the urgency for action to get this balance, or lose it for ever, is pressing.  Reaching this second balance would revolutionise how people use the Earth Systems and revolutionise the technologies that we all use every day.   This balance is essential for the near and far future of all peoples but has been, and continues to be, resisted very strongly by governments wanting to protect specific corporations and specific technologies and also resisted directly by many corporations.   To make the change feasible, organisations and inter-government agreements, such as the WTO, IMF, OECD and trade agreements, need to reset their goals to deliver this balance using firm sticks for recalcitrant and prevaricating corporations and governments.   Allowing non-compliance would be unfair for countries and corporations trying to modernise and move their economies towards sustainability.  The existing corporations in western nations would have the most to gain in the short term from preventing a move to sustainability but the people in the western nations would have most to gain in the long term from the economic growth associated with transforming their economies with sustainable technologies.  While most of these changes will come about through the action of markets, western government will need to ensure that corporations are small enough to fail as their unsustainable business models become worthless and not disturb the nation’s economy; this is especially relevant to large banks which need to be broken into much smaller entities.   For markets to work properly participants need accurate factual information.  Accurate information for the public on sustainability is the key for markets to move to sustainability and also to allow the democratic processes in these countries to work.   In many countries reliable accurate information on many sustainability issues, such as global warming, has been challenged by the vested interests of the press and also amazingly by governments cutting funding to organisations that were set up to gather and provide factual information to facilitate the democratic processes.  While this is a matter for individual governments to correct, it is in the interests of the global community to see that all governments collect and provide factual information for their people.  And if in doubt, governments will not be wrong if they err on the side of social and environmental sustainability.  While one hopes that corporations and governments will see the value in sustainability, existing loyalties and the desire for individual wealth fogs these values for many people.  Consequently, to help facilitate the provision of information and development and implementation of policies to move to sustainability, governments will need to make adjustments to facilitate community action in courts or tribunals to obtain the deliver sustainability from organisations. 

 

I hope the idea of ‘balances’ stimulate more work and action to deliver the SDGs.  However, I note that developing full utilization of the existing resources in the real economy (balance 1) will be difficult for state government and countries in the Euro Zone as they do not issue their own currencies and are therefore tied to other government’s fiscal policies.  To achieve SDGs hundreds of millions of people need to be motivated and fired up to take action but they also need the information to know if their actions will be sustainable and actually deliver the SDGs in the long term.  Government and CEOs of government agencies and private corporations have an enormous ability to encourage or destroy people’s motivations. They also have the ability to monitor and guide developments that actually deliver SDGs in the long term.   Positive government action is essential.  I hope the idea of ‘balances’ and the indicators that could be devised to test these balances give a way for conservative neoliberal leaders to adjust what they do and so facilitate the delivery of the SDGs while at the same time saving face; moving as it were from politician to statesman.  

 

Lal Manavado • Senior Advisor at undefined from Norway

Tiered policy coordination In my contribution on the difficulties the successful achievement of the SDG's would face, I noted the problem of policy coordination as a major obstacle. Here, I would  like to outline their extent. A significant number of policy decisions are made by international organisations, which has a significant impact on the national/regional policies. IMF/World Bank, ITO, WHO, EU, etc., are few of those. Some like ILO could make a policy contribution, FAO, which if implemented, may considerably enhance the living conditions of millions of workers. The question now is, to what degree do these and other influential bodies resort to a holistic approach when they make their  development policy decisions? For instance, does ITO makes any attempt to achieve some policy congruence with WHO with respect to food trade? I think that unless there is some policy congruence in the decisions made by organisations of international influence with reference to our fundamental needs, viz., education, nutrition, health, security in its widest sense, procreation and our non-material needs,  it is difficult to forsee a more sanguine future for those who have been deprived for so long. If we are willing and able to do so, here, we would be striving for some global policy congruence, call it coherence if you will, though that it does not  sufficiently emphasise the purpose of a policy. Likewise, the regional organisations like the EU ought to coordinate their external policies with reference to the SDG's. Naturally, the same applies to national governments. At the national level, we have to begin anew, i.e., the national policies are global in their possible impact, but here, the term 'global' is used in its restricted sense, i.e., global for a country. Similarly, it is possible to identify a regional and a local policy levels within the national boundaries. Perhaps, this is a dream, but I think it would be worthwhile to keep in mind this type of tiered policy coordination with a view to achieving their  maximum possible congruence, may prove to be a useful aid to achieve the SDG's. Cheers! Lal Manavado.From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org]Sent: 03 March 2016 03:06To: Lal ManavadoSubject: [World We Want 2030] Quentin Farmar-Bowers I am a retired academic and former consultant and public servant from Australia commented on the Discussion "The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: scope and implications"

Tokunbo Lijadu-Oyemade (not verified)

Dear Lai, 

It is not so much a dream to expect that responsibility difused down the line to the regions and national levels as it concerns "global agendas".  The United Nations may be expected to "midwife" the nations of the world in terms of development.  We need to remember that each of our countries were represented at every level of the dialogues that emanted to the global development directions thereafter adopted at the United Nations level.   Our countries were also represented at High Levels in the UN. Summits where the Policy Instruments such as the SDG's were adopted...  Its time to be alive to our own responsibilities and commitments made to those International Treaties and Conventions aceeded to and take responsibility to ensure their incorporation into national plans.  

THE REGIONAL ECONOMIC GROUPINGS

Nevertheless, in as much as we expect the UN to midwife the globe, so also the Regional Economic Groupings MUST of necessicity live up to the expectation or the necessity of "midwifing" the development of their member states by ensuring a focused inclusion of the global development directions in the Agendas prepared and presented to their Decision Making Organs for deliberations at Experts, Commissions, Ministeria and Heads of Governments' levels.  

The Regional Economic Groupings need to take responsibility to promote sectoral complementarity  through Technical Assistance to their member states that would culminate necessarily in Regional Policy Coherence which would in turn progress towards coherence of national policies for each region.  This would not only engender focus towards attaining the global development agenda but would elicit greater percentage achievements  of the global objectives enunciated in the SDG's

The Regional Economic Groupings like ECOWAS, SADC, COMESA, UDEAC, EADC, ECCAS and others that  form THE PILLARS of the African Union need to wake up and ensure the "REBIRTH" of their respective regions.  

FINALLY.

The United Nations should go a step further to turn them in the right direction in this respect.  I do not believe they are doing enough to bring about the desired change and change the fortunes of the citizens of their respective sub-regions.

Stephanie Johnson (not verified)

It seems as if one of our biggest issues is affordable housing, this directly effects so many issues, if people can afford to put a roof over their heads, and have enough disposable income, a lot of issues would heal themselves, this is the best artilce i have found to help solve this issue: http://www.demographia.com/dhi2014.pdf

Dr.Amb.Asabe Shehu Yar'Adua • President and Founder of Asabe Shehu Yar'Adua Foundation at Asabe Shehu Yar'Adua Foundation from Nigeria

Stephanie 

If you have a roof over your head without other  Amenities and Social Infrastructure, life will be meaningless

Yvan Trésor (not verified)

Hello everyone Dear Friends,

 Above all we must keep in mind that the main theme of the 2030 agenda for sustainable development and move from setting objectives to their implementation, thus to act with as a key principle of leaving person behind, very encouraging things like principle that complements directly where the MDGs have not happened is to say to a commitment involving all states of the world.

 

Remember that these are 17 targets 169 targets that make up our whole ecosystem, I guess the principle of leaving no one behind can be put into practice by asking who needs a particular goal first, by what means to reach its fair value? What would be the purpose of these 17 objectives would be most useful to him immediately finally the person, community or country in question feels inspire, motivate and interest to contribute to that same calendar 2030 for sustainable development ...                                                      

Because in all these 17 goals, one goal perform well would produce accelerate or achieving other on every level and area of ​​our ecosystem.    

 

In this 2030 agenda for sustainable development, I think the best would be not to calculate in terms of country or nation only, but in terms of region or group of states. Let me explain ; if carefully considering the current situation we can realize that among the six countries eg which are adjacent three or four of them often rhyme on the same rhythm of life, culture, religion and education and development ...                

from my point of view, the solution which can pave the way for better policy coherence for sustainable development, would be the direct collaboration of such countries in achieving this agenda 2030, the merger of their efforts and their weaknesses, although that people who live in such countries often coexist as neighbors, even in systems that shape these countries we often find that one is strong in any area than the other, in the development education eg. or in agriculture, or in the economy or in new technologies, or good governance, etc ...                                                                                                                                                    

I imagine that if a country brings its strength in its neighboring country and vice versa, began on areas involve less vis-à-vis the resistance leaders, I think this could be a good asset to the achievement of the 2030 agenda for sustainable development!     

 

For me the United Nations development system could provide a coordinated and integrated support for the implementation of Agenda 2030 by raising benefit by its strong experience the vision of this agenda to all communities, individuals and organizations able to discern the importance and urgency of the implementation of this agenda, by the  campaigns of information through forums, conferences, meetings, all in the context of establishing action plans applicable in the short and the long-term depending on the purpose and importance of its implementation.      

 

 

   

 

Kebulun Alliance in America (not verified)

To achieve the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and principle of leave no one behind, we must form a sustainable economy. For an economy to be sustainable it must be based on agriculture.

Green Economy

For Green Economy to be successful it must be community driven meaning the community must control the entire spectrum of it’s of its currency, planting harvesting production manufacturing supply distribution. Etc.

To assist with the 2030 Agenda, Kebulun Alliance LLC has   developed the Sustainable living -HEMP Project.

On March 2, 2015 KEBULUN ALLIANCE LLC was approved and filed with the STATE OF INDIANA.

KEBULUN ALLIANCE LLC is organized for the purpose of advancing American Nationals to build inter-dependent communities that are prosperous and diversified in the for-profit, industrial, community and general interests of the American Nationals and their trade areas.

Currently the project is rehabbing a homestead which will provide a model for sustainable living, due to the currently weather condition in Indiana the project development is focused on the inside.

KEBULUN ALLIANCE LLC looks to build a School of research providing education to the public of the benefits of industrial hemp, and the importance of living holistic lives where we will be self-sufficient and self-sustaining. Applying sciences and cultures will become limitless in researching the connection all Indigenous people of the planet have with one another.  It will prove the responsibility we have with our planet.

 Kebulun Alliance LLC looks to work together to build businesses that will contribute to the forward progress, justice and happiness amongst fellow beings to solve our common problems in order for us to become a dynamic, prosperous and active community.

 When fully integrated in international development strategy framework KEBULUN ALLIANCE LLC can lead to enhanced investments in the agro-industry, tourism, renewable energy, the creative industry, and infrastructure-bonds.

As awareness about the ecological crisis and climate change has increased in recent years there is growing agreement we need to make changes to the global economy.

Deforestation is occurring at around 3% per year, and hemp is a far superior resource since it can be grown to maturity in 100 days. Hemp paper is far stronger and durable than paper made from trees.

Hemp can grow anywhere and doesn't require pesticides, herbicides or fungicides. Evidence suggests that it can lift heavy metals from polluted soil. It also adds nutrients to soil by tapping into sub-soil nutrients other plants cannot access.

Hemp biomass fuel produces no Sulphur and can be effectively used as a relatively clean power source due to its 95% fuel to feed ratio.

Hemp is used in the world's major currency banknotes because it is so strong and water resistant. It is also a sustainable replacement for concrete along with other forms of resources.  

Of all the plants in the world hemp is the most profitable and desirable crop that can be grown. Archaeologists, anthropologists, and philologists cite physical evidence indicating that hemp is one of mankind’s oldest cultivating crops.  The weaving of hemp yields the strongest known metal-like fiber.  It is the strongest of the vegetable fibers and gives the greatest production per acre and requires the least attention. It requires no weeding but also kills off all weeds.  Its Roots grow in such a way that it is a natural aerator which leaves the soil in splendid condition, thus eliminating the need to burn fields to grow new crops. Hemp can grow in any climate.  One acre of it could replace over 4 acres of trees and by using just over five percent of our land to raises as energy.  It could power the entire continent for one year. If applied properly hemp could replace all sources of energy assisting the world’s ecosystems and restore the atmospheres oxygen balance with no disruption of the standard of living. It could replace all fossil fuels, plastics and most if not all of our fibers.

Kebulun Alliance LLC   wants to be an innovative alliance tool to give grassroots organizations their independence from donors, governments, and commercial enterprise, by creating Jobs, Opportunities, Workshops and Training.

Kebulun Alliance LLC    requires funding for land and to build a manufacturing and distribution plant. The plant shall manufacture products whose source originates from industrial hemp. The revenue from the distribution plant shall fund the Sustainable living -HEMP Project.

In addition the project   has contracted with farmers local and abroad to supply industrial hemp for processing at our future manufacturing plants.

To maintain transparency a website will be created with live streaming to track the construction of the project. All donors will be invited to tour the completed community.

At the international level all challenges regarding the project can be neutralized by composing, and mutually agreeing on laws based on maxims.

The UN’ role with the project can be that of  funding and a  bridge connecting the project to other communities  local and abroad , along with ensuring community’s honor the agreed upon maxims.

Kebulun Alliance LLC   is currently composing crowdfunding pages to fund the manifestation of the project.  After initial funding the project looks to be self-sufficient. The endorsement of the UN would allow a larger audience for our endeavors.

We need to realistically, rethink, reorganize and to civilly remake the world safe for a peaceful co-existence, based on mutual respect. The world should not only be made safe for democracy. It should, more importantly, be made safe for justice and equity, which are the tenets of peace. Even though the current economic crisis and threats of war that poses many challenges for peace to all people in all countries, mankind has undoubtedly made tremendous strides in science and technology to advance the cause of good health, understanding and cooperation not to employ or revisit the same strides to destroy the very basis of our existence and happiness.

We are prepared to answer all inquiries as to our intentions and will utilize this venue for that purpose.

Humbly awaiting your reaction

Thomas Edward McGrone El

Kebulun Alliance LLC

 

 

 

Lal Manavado • Senior Advisor at undefined from Norway

Profit Excludes 'Green' from the Economy The problem with modern economy is twofold. As Mr. Farmar-Bowers pointed out in his contribution, some of its notions have emerged as an ideology that directs the actions of politicians and administrators. I will even go farther and claim that it has become a part of public belief just as religions did many a moon ago. One who says human progress cannot be measured in terms of 'output of goods and services' or 'gross this or that product'  might elicit tolerant grins at best. The problem of profit is not a theoretical one, rather it is our dismal failure to grasp what it entails that has given rise to the countless instance of avoidable misery and incredible barbarity, especially after the industrial revolution. Why? The answer is quite simple. Has anyone ever attempted to quantify what may constitute a justifiable gain under a given set of conditions? I am not talking about price-controll, rather about what is fair and civilised. Even the capitalists of the past had some inkling about the need for limiting profit, otherwise, it is difficult to explain the revulsion with which usury (charging an inordinately high interest on cash loans) was regarded in the past. In spite of this, a cursory look around us is enough to show that non-productive profit seeking has become the dominant part of the current economy. And in its productive portion, the picture is as unattractive as in its non-productive counterpart. For instance, stock brokering, speculation in stocks and shares, gambling on commodity futures are productive of cash to those who engage in them, but they produce nothing of value to the world. Agro-industry offers us the saddest instance of profit seeking resulting in hunger, unemployment and loss of dignity. Despite the rhetoric to the contrary, in most affluent countries, farmers have to sell their produce to wholesale buyers at ridiculous prices, and become dependent on government subsidies. Meanwhile the wholesale buyers sell  to food industry and both middlemen put on Dollars as the consumers of factory made human feed put on weight. Moreover, farmers who wish to be independent cannot find reliable buyers apart from the collssi of food industry, so they go under. Law of economics or is it not a manifestation of the law of the jungle as practised by semi-monopolies? The same applies to every other area where the term profit motivates people to action. Please do not assume that this is jotted down to promote altruism, which can be as foul as gross profit seeking. The difficulty is we are so afraid to step forward and say, 'indeed, one should be rewarded for one's efforts, but it should be justifiable, and how much of  such justified rewards one may  keep for oneself needs a very careful scrutiny.' If we can agree on profit seeking on this basis, nearly all will be well. As things are, desire for unlimited profit is the prime-mover of economy.  This is because it has become a consciously or unconciously acquired ideology, be it in the mind of the 'richest man in the galaxy or kid from some slum pushing awful drugs on a ghastly street. On the other side of this unseemly scene, limitless desire for profit necessitates increasing the production of anything that can be sold, whether it is needed by civilised man  or not. The resultant waste of finite world resources has brought about an environmental and human mental disaster Attila the Hun and Jengis Khan together could not have achieved even if they tried with some modern expert's help. Now soemthing obvious; profit is what one participant of an exchange gains over and above what he has put into the product exchanged. Here, the buyer of the product expects a fair deal, but can he today? Doesn't advertising business gains billions and who foots the bill? Is this fair to the buyer? Why? Can anyone really claim that people don't know where to get what they want? Remember the surprise of old travellers when they saw how fast news travelled across vast areas before newspapers, letters, phone, radio, telly, and www? I know the pathetic words one can expect to hear in answer, but then, ask yourself, are you sure you don't have any vested interests in  making profit  that go well beyond what you need to meet your justifiable needs? Lal Manavado. From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org]Sent: 03 March 2016 21:46To: Lal ManavadoSubject: [World We Want 2030] Kebulun Alliance in America Project manager Sustainable living -HEMP Project. from United States commented on the Discussion "The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: scope and implications"

Galina Fedorova • from United States

"At the international level, what are challenges to ensuring policy coherence for sustainable development? What are some examples of best practice and/or who are the "trail blazers" leading the way to improved coherence?"

Growing Humanitarian needs and widening gap between needs and available resources call for a greater involvement of at the moment under-utilized private sector and international communities. Individual donors are deeply concerned about lack of transparency and inefficiency of humanitarian aid and development assistance. Donating money is pretty much the only way for individuals to get involved, which greatly limits their participation. Refugee Crisis in Europe showed a great desire of individual donors to help. However, their individual efforts in most cases were not coordinated with the work of charities on the ground and were very ineffective. As public continues to engage with humanitarian crisis they will increasingly add chaos to the process, unless they become a part of the solution.

At the same time, Charitable organizations are operating without the benefits of modern enterprise technology. They lack the tools to express their specific needs, to provide transparency about a flow of resources from donors to people in need and to effectively engage international communities and public sector.

We developed a technology that helps to solve this issue:

GOODdler (www.gooddler.com) offers an enterprise software to civic and charitable organizations anywhere in the world to collect and manage “in kind” donations. We provide technology to utilize local retailers to maximize an effectiveness of humanitarian aid and disaster relief efforts, solve resource distribution problem and expand outreach. Gooddler facilitates the continued flow of resources between donors and beneficiaries, improves the coherence of humanitarian response, ensures funding is used efficiently by partners, and strengthens public trust, increasing opportunities for ‘in kind’ (goods) contributions. It is a digital platform where private companies can see the vetted requirements of any humanitarian organization and connect to respond to them.

Gooddler is building humanitarian capacity through a multi-stakeholder collaborative process, including local and national governments, international organizations, national and international NGOs, donors, and local businesses and farmers.

How it works: NGOs are given a tool to create multiple wishlists with goods from international or local retailers. These lists can be customized to fit the needs. Items from these lists can be purchased by anyone in the world, and delivered to the intended recipients in the most efficient way.

We are looking forward to partnering with you.

Jamion (not verified)

This is a timely discussion. I agree with many of the comments here. I would like to add that a stronger focus is needed on promoting access to information, press freedom and the use of ICTs to promote development. It is imperative that the agenda take into consideration, the enriching value of these components listed above.

Melaku Geleta Wakjira (not verified)

National Implementation

Dear Moderator,

This is very useful platform to the UNECOSOC & UNDP to get global reflections towards the UN global support in the context of a ground and national realities. I believe, within these contexts, practical examples would be forwarded in order to address the subject under discussions. My commentary and advices are spinning around such perspectives. Thank you very much for this early stage chances and e-discussions which I think are critically important to influence the SDG’s 2016-2030 directions.    

A Point from Moderator: How can the SDGs be effectively mainstreamed into relevant national sustainable development policies and programmes, while preserving countries' policy space to pursue national priorities? How can the UN development system best support this?

 

  1. We have to be very clear on a common ground should exist between countries national plan and the UN SDG’s, i.e. how each countries define SDG’s from their national sustainable development goal perspective is critically important. It is clear that the SDG’s crafted with full participation UN member states. It is clear that the finally approved SDG’s endorsed by full participation of all member states. In order to effectively defining the roles of the UN in due courses of SDG implementation, we have to go out from businesses as usual approach. We have to ask key questions. Such as, what are the countries development models are focusing on? Growth model at work are dealing with? How relevant are they for SDG’s? Such questions have to be asked & get proper answers before go to SDG’s implementations. The UN country programs must come up with a transformative operational strategy as well to compliment the national plan. And the UN country programs should propose innovative solutions for unfinished MDG businesses and transformative, new social, economic and political direction compatible to the 15 years ambitious global development goal. Countries must be prepared to see 360° in to their national policies, strategies and detail action plans emanated from the growth and development model they owned at UN general assembly. I proceed to my comments from these angles. 

 

  • For example “Ending extreme poverty in all forms by 2030” is a very broad goal. This would be achieved mainly through having vibrant development model, inclusive by its approach, nondiscriminatory by its applications, multicultural by its nature. Above all, it has to address all strides of human life. It has to be very sensitive for invisible class formation related risks. As some studies indicate, the implementation of the MDG has affected some community groups. In some areas there were differences between the qualitative and quantitative achievements of the MDG. In fact the realty was varying from country to countries, from continent to continents. This time countries must work for the qualitative levels of achievements. We have to be very clear that there is a big difference between ending poverty and ending extreme poverty. The extreme poverty is all about the fulfillments of three basic needs, food, shelter and closing. It is the country’s development model that would determine the achievements of these needs. This is primarily an assignment for African and Asian continents. The challenges with these two continents are mainly related to absences of good governess, democratic governments, employment opportunities, corruptions and peace and security. A country under such stranded condition can’t deliver in qualitative term on SDG’s. One has to note that, the remaining 17 SDG’s are extensions for the achievements of “Ending extreme poverty in all forms by 2030”.   

 

  • If we look in to the second goal, it is all about “Ending hunger, achieve food security, improve nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture” This is very basic goal to transform a society to other levels of life. This goal is mainly focusing on a sector where countries GDP are coming from. Having sustainable agriculture is paramount importance to assure food security at country and household level. Because of so many structural and nonstructural problems, the agriculture sector in Africa, Latin America and Asia is becoming less resilient for seasonal shocks and disasters usually caused by climate changed. The climate change phenomenon is showing a continuum. Unless developed countries choose suitable development model, they will continue suffering from structure and nonstructural sectorial problems. The required emancipation for the sector fall on the shoulder of the type of economic model the country follows. The question must be raised is, are we in a visible food insecurity situation? Do our agriculture sector is resilient for climate change happening globally but affecting us locally? If the answers are yes for both fundamental questions, therefore, it is time for the countries (mainly for the developing & non industrial nations) to think about innovation and technology transfer need for the sector. This is basically important to bring both structural and nonstructural rapid changes. In addition, in the process of transiting from agrarian to industrial or agro industrial economy, the required human development must be considered. It is the quality of the human development packages can decide the yield of the sector. Therefore, ending hunger is the results of the balance between the supply and demand parts including the surplus production must be available at national level. In this case the purchasing power of the society has to be significantly improved in order to stimulate local markets and purchasing power of the society.  The multi-faceted achievements of the sector, such as improved food security, improved agriculture and improved nutrition are possible if the agriculture sector structural and nonstructural problems are well addressed under the growth and development model of that specific country.  Countries like Latin America, Africa and Asia must work hard to transform the sector to other levels of achievements. These nations must look back. They have to conduct qualitative assessments to see all achieved developments of the sector. This is the age of climate change. The sustainability of the agriculture sector by far becoming out of human hand.  Especially for developing countries the challenge is a triple fold. Hence, national level SDG’s implementation means for the sector is all about how to address the need for food security at household levels. In this regards, to this sector the issues of natural resources governance,  inclusive developments and land use & management policies are critical areas has to be addressed under 2016-2030 SDG’ implementation. The need for land for commercial faming versus problems related potentially poor community members, marginalization’s needs to be carefully consider. The national land use strategy is critically important in order to promote sustainable agriculture under agriculture, agro-pastoralist and pastoralist livelihood contexts. Especially this is recommendable for agrarian society who are getting more than 50% of GDP. 

 

  • The health sector was another broad focus area for the year 2016-2030 SDG.  It is widely believed that a society free from extreme poverty with sustainable income is usually had standard heath care services and insurances. Such thinking seems outdated & needs to be re-revised according the changing socio- economic situations of the world. In this case governments are primarily responsible bodies to provide there people a standard health care & health insurances services. Regardless of the society economic and social strata, citizens should be granted appropriate health care services. This must be taken as one aspect of citizenry rights. When we say standard health services, it has to cover all ranges of human life cycle, including pregnant mothers and children in their mother wombs too. The role the government must be focused on how to insure equity in the process of resource distribution and allocation to the sectors across all levels of societal classes. There is no ways for citizens to get standard and basic health services where the social and economic gaps are broaden year after year unless the government commitments are significantly enhanced during the SDG implementation years. As indicated under the overall SDG’s, “assuring good health is all about health life and promotion of well- being to all at all levels”. In this case, the goal will be achieved only through huge investment for the health sector. The investment would ranges from infrastructure expansions to human resource development including assuring high levels public participation in the fields of health extension and promotion.   

 

  • Similar to the above SDG’s there are detail and strategic areas require attentions for the education sector, countries should go beyond a mere language saying national education program coverage. This time the education policy of each UN member countries should focus on; Provision of quality education at primary, secondary, tertiary, college and vocational centers. The education policy must focus on how to go beyond national capacity building. The possibility to export trained and competent professionals to other nations with limited human capacity is new areas of opportunity to the sector. The education sector future strategy must focus on attaining professional Excellency; promote innovations and trans-boundary researches where finally investment in education sector would be considered as international business. This would bring the importance of transnational alliances and corporations to bring expected Excellency in the sector. If education policy and strategy working on this directions, issues of unemployment will significantly reduce. Because the global workforce and demand is still unbalanced. In addition to the above points, because of the absence of qualified and trained workforces everywhere in our planet, very simple challenges are sustaining without being solved. As a result the responsibility of this sector is becoming critical towards achieving the SDG’s during 2016-2030.

 

  • The education policy and strategy that we mentioned above has to be designed in a way the education system and the curriculum would empower women for a batter contribution to the global economy & aspired world. The attitude of seeing women empowerment as only for women benefit must be changed. We have to accept that they have critical contribution in changing our world, shaping the future & above all promoting the untapped skills and potentials for innovation and change. I most cases these were undermined for so many centuries. If we proud for what we have achieved to this date, i.e. in the absences  of women participation or biased gender understanding or  ascribed roles, this time we must explore the unexplored on for our betterment. The need for gender equity begin with the education system, grow to the employment and work sector, proceed to social, economic and political fields.

 

  • The issues of provisions of clean water and sanitation should not continue as an issue of simple service provisions. Under this goal each countries national plan should clearly indicate the meaning of access, affordability & quality water from practical and technical point of views. The goal for this sector for 2016-2030 should show to what extent governments are committed to assure the provision of access, affordable & quality water to their nations. Undisclosed reports from the past MDG’s shows that most of the developing countries were reporting achievements on access for water indiscriminately as for affordability and quality. However, that was not the realty. As this sector is a critical sector for achievements of most the SDG’s, governments should take appropriate measures to allocate significant investment for affordable & quality water access.  In addition, it is clear that the development pace of all nations may not be on the same page at same levels. In some cases, the development in the urban areas different from what has been achieved the rural areas. In some cases, the development in agriculture livelihood context exceed from what has been achieved in the pastoralists and agro-pastoralist contexts. Given these and similar other preconditions, government’s strategy and plan for affordable and quality water access must be free from systematic and unnoticed marginalization. On similar stances, the issues of access, affordability and reliability can be discussed under energy sector.  In the provisions of these basic services we should make sure that any parts of the nation are not discriminated and left behind from the national benefits. The governances system recommended for the remaining sectors should be considered for the water and energy sector too. Governments should notice that, unless a resource allocation & national and local level investments for the energy and water sector are based on the principles of resource equity, the life standard discrepancies between livelihoods, economic classes, and geographical locations will remain as it is throughout 2016-2030. 

 

  • We can summaries about the rest of SDG’s as follows. In general, the practical implementation of the ambitious SDG 2016-2030 is in the hands of world leader in general, each nation in particular. The commitment time is already passed. Now actions are started. Each country needs to be very honest about the future of its nation in particular and our world in general. There are times where we are sharing collective responsibilities. There are times where we are individually accountable for our actions. Both individual and collective accountabilities are applied interchangeably as required as needed in the entire implementation time of the SDG’s. Most of the developing nations are implementing their national development plan through FDI and development aids. The implementation of SDG’s requiring huge financing. This would be covered from own resources, development aids, loan from financial institutions and bilateral governments supports and sometimes from humanitarian assistances. If governments failed to properly plan appropriate national strategies, polices and plans, they obviously have planned to fail. In this regards the following critical points needs to be examined in the due courses of the implementation of SDG’s;

 

  1. All national plans, strategies and programs must be emanated from the democratic governance principles i.e. by the people, for the people & with the people. In other words, they have to respect human rights; human dignity ultimately should work for human development and decent life on our planet. 

 

  1. Corruption and good governances are the two most important elements to be considered for the success of SDG’s 2016-2030. If a country is well known for corruption no way to deliver on SDG’s. I am mentioning multifaceted types of corruption. Corruption is not only taking public resources, the most dangers one it will get power for  false report production usually  misleading  the others. Hence, in the absences of good governance, there is no guarantee if the resources allocated for SDG’s is used for the unintended purposes and again no way to check the credibility of the delivery. If a system based corruption existing, it is very difficult to fight it. Therefore, the importance of good governance is mandatory to deliver on SDG’s accountably, responsibly with shared responsibility and controlled system.

 

  1. Countries must be clear about the development model they have at national level. They have to make sure if their national development plan is in line with all UN declarations, principles, their national laws, sub-regional and continental agreements & protocols. They have to carefully refer these all international and national covenants while developing or adopting any development models. These international, national and regional documents are prepared to make sure collective and individual accountabilities are met. The documents are referring what must be done and do not. They are giving directions on how to realize a safe world or contribute towards safe world. The documents are human centered, nature centered, equity centered, standard centered, quality centered, principle centered, law centered, politics centered, culture centered, economy centered, protection centered, quality centered, peace and security centered etc. It talks about today, forewarn about tomorrow and envisage for the future.  The ultimate goal of SDG’s is” no one left behind”. If our development model serving some part of the nation and affecting the others, or deviate from the principles of inclusive development, no way to deliver on SDG’S. A sustainable development will examine all contexts. SDG’s are predestined to the principles of sustainability.                       

 

A point from Moderator: What are key areas for making progress on and building national and sub-national capacities for sustainable development, and how do they differ across country contexts (e.g. least developed countries, middle income countries, high-income countries, countries in situations of fragility etc.)? When and how can partnerships effectively contribute to capacity building and sustainable development?

  • One of the UN expert level supports to the member states is building of the national capacity of a member states for program execution. The implementation of the 17 SDG’s goals is requiring professional,   technical, financial, and thematic and program supports from the UN. To me by now all UN agencies should finish the preparation of specialty areas capacity building packages for SDG’s execution. If not yet, this must be prepared in the coming months or years. It is this support that keeps a balance between UN and member states in the entire SDG’s implementation life time. During the preparation of the capacity bundling packages, it would have been very good if all UN documents thoroughly referred to set standards, qualities, measurements, procedures, rules and regulations in line SDG’s thematic areas (declaration, standards, protocols, principles etc.). This would help to put UN at the position of a partner of choice. In additions, these will help to the UN to look beyond the conventional and traditional delivery realm.  As capacity building work is not one time work, through peer reviewing process, joint learning opportunities, there will be a room for periodical capacity gap identification to take a required action.     

 

A point from Moderator: What steps are necessary to ensure that all stakeholders, including the government, private sector and civil society can readily exchange information and experiences? How can "peer exchange" be established and nurtured?

  • As I already indicated above, the UN must go from traditional and conventional delivery focused program exclusion approach. In most cases the UN is shying away to comment the weakness of governments in development program implementation and other related business. It is widely heard that the UN would like to operate within safe zone. Some times reports are prepared to maintain such status quo. This tradition needs to be changed.
  • The governments are expecting the UN to serve as a “surrogate mother”. It is wrongly understood that UN is there to provide service with no right to question or to say no. This is totally against partnership principle for mutual accountability & for common goal.
  • The role of a private sector, civil society organizations engagements on UN-Government national program was significantly undermined in the past. It looks like UN and governments are playing on one side and the private sector & CSO are on the other side. 

 

  • In order to improve these challenges & for a better SDG’s implementation, the role and responsibilities of each sectors must be defined. The participation of the CSO and private sector is very decisive. Hence, to the interest of the implementation of SDG’s, to jointly monitor on its achievements and to periodically follow up on the  possible challenges , the establishments of peer reviewing platform is very important. Country offices should initiate the establishments of such platforms to start to exercise a joint SDG’s implementation monitoring in the coming years where they can capitalize and taping learning and experiences.       
Galina Fedorova • from United States

Thank you for sharing your thoughts!

Lucas Charles Mkwizu (not verified)

Policy development should be given more priority in developing countries because currently most of rural areas are behind the development steps. You can find apeople in rural areas are living a very poor life, with no better health services, education and even roads, How can we improve the livelhiid of the peope without improvement of their health services, education and even infrastructure. There shoule be a better system which will include all the stakeholders, approach such as PPP Public private partnership can be applied to facilitae the process of policy formulation and its implementation for the supporting the communities. Translation of the policies ina simple language and awareness raising should also not be forgetten in achieveing sustainable development

Rita Luthra

Better information helps us to make better decisions. Investing in wireless Internet technology is the way forward to tackle maternal mortality and morbidity in the developing countries. E-learning is the most cost-effective way of transmitting evidence-based medicine to the developing countries. Imagine sitting in office or at home in USA or Europe, and by interacting with different cultures we will be able to understand different customs and learn to respect the diversity. Imagine students in developing countries and the United States simultaneously reviewing the same medical curriculum and learning from each other. This is e-learning at its best in an Internet classroom, and it is the goal of our initiative in Women’s Health and Development, title: http://www.WomensHealthSection.com; which was launched in collaboration with the United Nations is serving about 14 million subscribers in 227 countries and it is available in six official languages of the United Nations.

 

It is indeed my pleasure to submit to you UN Documents E/2015/NGO/2 and E/2014/NGO/53

Over the years, the United Nations, governments, civil societies, and individuals have put forth countless plans of action for reducing maternal mortality and morbidity. According to the World Health Organization, at least 1,600 women will die today from a complication of pregnancy and childbirth, most of them in developing countries. No technical or political approach – no matter how well intentioned – has ever conquered this enormous problem. What is needed is broader dissemination of medical knowledge. And Internet classrooms and initiatives such as WomensHealthSection.com, can help that goal.

 

Please join our efforts; we welcome everyone.

 

Thank you for this opportunity 

Rita Luthra, MD

President

Women's Health and Education Center (WHEC)

NGO in Special Consultative Status with ECOSOC of the United Nations

Lal Manavado • Senior Advisor at undefined from Norway

Belief in electronic tools as an appropriate tool For a very long time, despite its dubious political creed, Cuba and several other 'developing countries' ranked well above USA in WHO's public health rankings. It is not necessary to point out those countries had only a vestigial electronic infra-structure when compared with that of the US. It would be remiss of one to overlook this important piece of evidence. Secondly,  a considerable portion of the burden of disease borne by people in poor countries can be attributed to  poor hygiene and sanitation. Another contributor to this state of affairs is inadequate/inappropriate nutrition. Today, we tend to ignore that access to clean drinking water, good sanitation, and improved hygiene and central heating, are among the greatest contributors to good public health in Europe. In poor countries, those who need those improvements most, live in rural areas or in over-crowded slums in cities.  Most of them are unemployed or eke out a precarious living by engaging in unhealthy or illegal activities. An un-official visit to slums that ring the 'economic miracle' Bombay and Calcutta, Johannesburg, Luanda in Angola, Rio de Janeiro, Cairo, Chicago, etc.,  would be sufficient to convince anyone of this. Here, we are talking about hundreds of millions. Quite a significant number of those people do not speak any language other than their own. Even when they do owing to their colonial history, it is not adequate to understand instructions given in English even when given in simplest terms. Sub-standard linguistic ability is a growing problem through out the world, and it is unrealistic to  base  an information campaign on the opposite assumption. Moreover,  health instructions given from home or a doctor's surgery in Europe or USA, even if understood, are incomprehensible to the target audience one has in mind, because their pictorial illustrations are different in kind.  This is a logical fact, and as such a given. What this means is that objects used to illustrate the 'how' part of the instructions are either unknown or inaccessible to the audience. Further, it is difficult to believe that instructors in those locales have any idea about the reality their audience actually experience. Thirdly, in many 'developing countries', there are many adequately qualified health personnel and training facilities. For instance, when USA invaded the tiny Caribbean island Grenada in the 80'ties,  there were around 5000 US citizens studying Medicine there! A cursory survey of the qualified health personnel working in Europe, USA, Canada, etc.,  would reveal that how dependent those developed countries are on those migrants, and their enormous number. Naturally, they have left their lands of origin in order to better their living conditions. So, it is not a question of lack of relevant medical competence, rather one of retaining much-needed manpower due to economic and political reasons. This is the crux to be mooted as GHWA, an affiliate of WHO is doing at present. Fourthly, resorting to electronic dissemination of information, even if it could be appropriate is a reductive, hence an ad hoc approach. In an environment where unemployment is rife, it is improper to introduce the so-called 'most economic' which is an euphemism for honest 'cheap', when what we need is a method that would create more jobs, held by appropriately trained people from the area who know and understand the local reality.  I find it heartening to see  in Eastern Europe a move towards training  medical practitioners using the local facilities, who will work in deprived areas in big cities and in rural parts providing some primary care and instructions in hygiene and sanitation.  I am pleasantly surprised by this development, because under the previous bolshevik sway,  the tendency was to centralise medical care,  where people either came to pre-determined places for treatment, or were instructed from some distant location, mostly by print. Its inappropriateness and ineffectiveness is reflected in public health statistics of those nations, but now the trend may take a turn for the better. So, I find it difficult to see how using electronic means to repeat the old Soviet strategy can serve the best interests of those suffering millions.  A vote sante! Lal Manavado. From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org]Sent: 08 March 2016 18:36To: Lal ManavadoSubject: [World We Want 2030] Rita Luthra from United States commented on the Discussion "The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: scope and implications"

Thura Aung • Executive Director at Radanar Ayar Association from Myanmar [Burma]

Of couse, as UN SG Stated this is our achievement as human being making consensus to adopt and implement SDG2030. More knowledge and capacity each of individual to all human being to carry out sustainability with their capability but don't forget human factors as well.

Melaku Geleta Wakjira (not verified)

Melaku Geleta 

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: scope and implications

Dear Moderator,

This is very useful platform to the UNECOSOC & UNDP to get global reflections towards the UN global support in the context of a ground and national realities. I believe, within these contexts, practical examples would be forwarded in order to address the subject under discussions. My commentary and advices in the three pints flagged by you are spinning around such perspectives. Thank you very much for this early stage chances and e-discussions which I think are critically important to influence the SDG’s 2016-2030 directions;

  1. How can the guiding principle of 'Leave no one behind' be put into practice in implementing the 2030 Agenda in different development contexts (e.g. least developed countries, middle-income countries, high-income countries, fragile states etc.)?
  2. At the international level, what are challenges to ensuring policy coherence for sustainable development? What are some examples of best practice and/or who are the "trail blazers" leading the way to improved coherence?
  3. How could the UN development system provide coordinated and integrated support for the achievement of the 2030 Agenda?

 

  • Least developed countries: for these nations the “Leave no one behind” principle applied through working for inclusive development where the basic needs of the entire nations would to be fulfilled by taking forward the 17 SDG’s  and 169 specific activities. For these nations, having a development model striving for a middle income society must be a priority task. As we all know, under this category cheap labor and abundantly found NR is easily available. However, there is scarcity of foreign direct investments, most of the productions systems are yet at primitive level, technological advancement & opportunities for innovation are at infancy level, research and scientific discoveries are unthinkable, industrialization is not yet reached to the levels of full scale development and the economy is mainly dependent on foreign aid and high loan burden. In contrary to this, the available human and natural resources potential can be converted to economic use, to be tapped to improve the life of the multitudes. This shows that, the availability of a glimmer of hope for successful implementations of SDG’s during 2016-2030. What is required is, to have a clear vision working towards inclusive economic, political and social transformation, lead and guided by democratic political and good governance system. To this category, an inclusive development path is highly recommended because, the issues of marginalization, the rights of indigenous people, resource based conflicts, illicit economic/ financial flow, trans-boundary crimes, the impacts of climate change, population growth, radicalism and terrorism, absences of good governance and corruptions are mainly sourced from the absences of inclusive development approaches.  Unless these issues are properly captured in the due courses of utilizing the available NR and human resources,  followed by improving the life livelihoods of the nation, finally targeted to reach to middle income society , therefore, the vision for 2016-2030 'Leave no one behind' is inconceivable. The primary assignments of the least developing countries should be, first to be ready to provide inclusive and highly prioritized development plan to the nation, second get a national consent & endorsement of their people on the plan, third adhere to the democratic rules of law, fourth mobilize a required resources for the implementation, fifth do the implementation in accountable ways under established good governance system & monitoring & evaluation instruments.  

                

  • Middle-income countries: Take parts of  what has been said above from  least developed countries  and yet, within the middle income countries;

 

  • Improved and quality job creation is still what is required 

 

  • Improved & sustainable sources of income needed

 

  • Improved technology and full scale IT utilization for technological  advancement is very critical  

 

  • Improved,  resilient and diversified economic system must lead the pave to a rod of  high income countries is critical towards SDG’s implementations    

 

 

  • High-income countries: Everyone must be clear that no one can leave in isolated world without understanding the other corner of the globe. If we try, we are driving unsustainable boat may sink at some point or crash at some time. The developing worlds are very important to the existences of high income counties. In this case, the following points are highly recommended to this category;

 

  • It has to start with maintaining what has been achieved in the past and followed by having  a visionary plan for inclusive and sustainable world. There are issues becoming trans-national, trans-boundary, trans-economy, trans-culture, trans-religion that potentially threatening the sustainability of our planet including the high income society. The responsibility of the developed world is threefold compared to the reaming world in implementing SDG’s. This nation needs to improve their national population growth policy for sustainable national development. These nations are on missing of the middle age generation. There are two ways to sustain what has been done by their forefathers; improve their internal population growth policy or support the middle income society to have improved human development policy that strategically can be absorbed by the economy of high income society. Using the fully nurtured and practically proofed democratic system in the highly developed nations, the high income courtiers should support the development of the remaining world as they able to have secure and protected political and economic system. The more fragile stats we are having in the world, the less the international security existing. Improving this context would guarantee the strategic, economic and development needs & alliances of high income counties with other nations usually cross boundary alliances. The 17 SDG’s and 169 activities are effective instruments to practically exercising the above facts for the interest of both high & low-income countries.

 

  • Encourage international companies to go to the developing countries to promote foreign direct investments. This would strategically help the highly developed countries to decrease issues related to human trafficking, cross border crimes, illegal migrations, and terrorism. In additions, highly developed countries are equally responsible to decrease a climate change impacts in low income countries through supporting green economy initiatives. More than 50% of SDG’s agendas are crafted to address challenges directly related to climate change impacts which were primarily caused by industrialized world, keep suffering economies of poor world under chronic food and human security. The way the high income countries support the agenda should emanate from the global goal for having sustainable and safe world. Hence, the resources for investment, the strategic support expected for 2016-2030 SDG’s implementation must be injected from high income countries for mutual & global accountability.      

 

 

  • Fragile states; Most problems observed in fragile stats are resulted from failure to deliver on national security and needs for development. This failure is growing to another and a new religion-political ideology. Fundamentalism, radicalism, its associated impacts are becoming international concerns. Because of poor handling of the problems at early stages, so many crises flourished and affecting the world in many directions.  If we conduct a strategic impact inquiry in the fragile countries, we can see a critical association between politics, economy and religion (these have become inseparable ideologies). The SDG’s was announced where this agenda was reached at its pick in the failed states and already understood as global challenge. The fate of the implementation of the SDG’s is primarily falling on the shoulder of politics, tolerance, peace and security. The peace and security issues are still a problem for leaders of the fragile states to come together to have a national vision. Most of the failed state and potentially failed states leaders are motivated by attitudes of narrow nationalism & narrow economic interests. The national vision is secondary matter to them. They have failed to think inclusively. SDG’s begin with thinking’s of inclusive development with a motto saying “no one left behind” at the end of 2030. Inclusivity wouldn’t be achieved without national reconciliation. What can be done to implement SDG’s in the fragile states is that, the problems related to peace and security must get a full attention of the UN and its alliances. Once the fragile and potentially at margin fragile states leaders make a clear demarcation between ideologies, local interests and national interests, then, they will have a national vision which is a precondition to deliver on SDG’s. A practical role of the UN must be on assuring on how to bring stability through the participation of the local community and political vanguards of each failed & potentially failed states. But we should not forget that each year the number of countries on the borderlines failed sates is increasing. Unless the world able to manage the existing one, we shall have more fragile sates sooner or later. We are on the age easy communication of cross boundary crisis. We have a very a good lesson for the UN and it alliances to be taken as example. We all remember the Arab spring invaded so many countries in a very few months. All involved national are sharing certain things in common. We know what happing across those countries. Similarly, such cross country crisis could ignite any time in any parts of the world that could potentially invade so many countries. Therefore, in a context of fragile states, the chance for the successful SDG’s 2016-2030 implementation is based on delivering on required political reforms followed by provision of inclusive political and economic policies.

Melaku Geleta WakjiraUNDP Ethiopia DRR&LR Program Cordinator 

 

LUMONA MZEE KIBORE (not verified)

My comment and contribution is that all of us how are we serous in eradicating poverty and advancing sustainable development focusing on people and planet without considered the rights of Indigenous Peoples especial in Sub-Sahara African countries by Adopting the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development as well as;Goal and Outcome priorities of the ICPD in the post-2015 development framework of greatly impact future Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) policy, and global implementation of MDGs goals (4,5 & 6) by ensuring access to SRHR services and an effective global response to HIV&AIDS. Reinforcing and scaling up linkages between HIV and SRHR which is critical for the achievement of the health related Millennium Development Goals namely: 4(Reducing child mortality); 5(Improving maternal health) and 6(Reducing new HIV infection as well as the African Union Maputo declaration & adopted Plan Action (2006), calling on countries to “strengthen commitment to achieving universal access to Sexual and Reproductive Health Services, including Family Planning.” In 2010 the Southern African Development Community recognized strengthening Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) and HIV linkages as key to achieving its target of a 50 percent reduction in new HIV infections by 2015. Who look for the health status of Women and Girls Indigenous Peoples, are the constitutional considered their health rights?, What of the role of the Global Fund on the issues of Women and Girls Indigenous Peoples.
Social Economic and Governance Promotion Centre(SEGP) based on experience working on the issues of Indigenous communities , cultural human rights and good governance in Tanzania. Our focus targeted indigenous communities mainly from tribe of Hadzabe who are extremely poor.

Indigenous pastoralist and hunter/gatherer communities constitute the most vulnerable segments of the Tanzanian society. Their economies and traditional ways of life rely heavily on cattle herding, as well as hunting and gathering. Climate change and its impacts have increased their vulnerability to an even greater extent.At the same time these communities have been subjected to forceful evictions from their ancestral lands to give room to other land uses, which are considered by the government to be more economically viable. These land uses include large scale crop cultivation, creation of Wildlife Protected Areas such as Game Reserves and expansion of National Parks and mining.
Generally, Tanzania’s policies, strategies and plans even the current proposed constitution of 2014 does not take into account the vulnerability and the, constitutional, political economic, social and cultural rights of indigenous peoples comprising of pastoralists and hunter gatherers especially tribes from Hadzabe and Barabaig. This type of society are particularly vulnerable to poverty ,discrimination, exclusion from government structure, constitutional and political rights, justice, involvement and participation in decision making bodies . They have no land or own any property their life style depends on hunting, eating fruits, wild animals, birds, insects etc.Currently, owing to lack of constitutional protection of land rights, the United Republic of Tanzania does not have a land rights regime which meets its obligation or merge the rights of indigenous peoples. This means that laws of Tanzania do not adequately recognize and protect indigenous pastoralists’ and hunter gatherers’ ancestral lands which constitute not only their means of subsistence but also the basis for their collective survival and development leading to the deprivation of their means of subsistence.Lack of gender equality is an issue of concern among indigenous communities normally they use traditional leaders to solve their problems; women are not allowed to participate in clans or chief doms meetings.Lack of houses, currently the live in grass houses and other living in holes and still dressing animal skins and some of them walk necked especially children.Regarding education, there are no schools, hence majority of them are illiterate, This situation denied them their chance of being included in Government& decision making bodies.indigenous communities health facilities are minimal leading to high mortality rate especially the under five. Many child and Women dies every day no body care.

Adopting the 2030 Agenda for sustainable development by inclusion and consider the rights of women and girls Indigenous peoples we can achieving gender equality and empowerment of Women and girls, reducing inequality and build peace among pastoralists communities fighting for land.In concluding my Government in Tanzania should provide social services and insist the indigenous people especially the tribe of Hadzabe interaction by other communities. This will enhance the development of Hadzabe by adopting way of living from other communities and now the first step is to work very closely with UN bodies to advance the issues of the indigenous peoples of Tanzania and improve their way of living and ensure that are fully participate in decision making bodies at all levels and included in government structure as well as access for Justice.Constitutional and political Rights;The dominant trend has generally been to define democracy almost entirely in terms of elections, where democracy is viewed as a system of constituting government authority and making that authority accountable to the citizens include indigenous communities.
Gender equality in constitutional rights and political participation is a fundamental aspect of modern democratic governance.; international standards, and women include indigenous communities ; equal rights and opportunities to participate in all aspects and at all levels of political processes and government structure. In practice, however, it is often more challenging for women from indigenous and pastoralists communities and to access and exercise these rights. We recommend that the government should have well transparency and accountable to the people a greater mechanisms; work to ensure greater citizen informed participation in elections, especially participation of indigenous and pastoralists communities both women, youth and marginalized groups; To enforce law for Non-partisan support ,political modernize, the leadership of indigenous peoples and greater internal democracy” and Political Parties in relation to their respective role of contributing to democratic elections. Engage effectively indigenous and pastoralists communities in political and electoral processes This means addressing factors that mitigate inclusive participation by these groups and the creation of sustainable processes to empower and build capacities for effective participation in politics and elections, i.e. as candidates, voters, and election officials,Electoral bodies should enforce the law to political parties to Improve their parties manifestos and modernized parties management bodies and committees in gender perspective including marginalized groups and indigenous, will ensure greater citizen informed participation in elections especially women and other marginalized groups and will enable parties to up-to-date information on the situation of women, youth,PWDs and their participation in the governance structures and recommendations on how women, youth could be better included in the decision-making processes and development of the country

Lumona Kibore/Secretary General
Social Economic and Governance Promotion Centre(SEGP)
P.o.box 4114,Dar es salaam,Tanzania
Tel:255">Tel:255754 689451/255 653 780310
E-mail:segpcentre@gmail.com

Lal Manavado • Senior Advisor at undefined from Norway

Development by remote-control. Under the bolshevik regime, N. Kruschchoff launched a gigantic 'development project even larger than that in Tanzania you mention, which involved damming Amur-Daria river so that huge cotton and wheat collectives could be established in Uzbekistan and parts of Kasakstand. Those areas were the home of pastoralists for perhaps several millenia, and over the years, a fine balance had been achieved between the needs of nomads and their flocks, and the grass the latter needed. Then came the 'development' orders from distant Moscow. Today, the ruins of Steppe in those 'developed' areas can scarcely feed many animals, and salination of the soil due to increaseing use of fertilisers during the soviet era has turned that area barren. Moscow did not bother to investigate what the people there wanted, nor yet what the soil in those areas could support. So now, a way of life and a culture is gone, and once lush green Steppe is gone. That's not all. Amur-Daria is the principal source of water of Aral sea, once the sixth largest body of fresh water in the world. Now, it has shrunk so much that waterline lies nearly 40 Km from where it was sixty years ago. Nobody knows how many species of fish has disappeared from Aral sea. On the shore lie rusting trawlers abandoned where there were fishing towns earlier. It is a scene from a nightmare. Once, a fishing fleet sailed on Aral sea, its annual catch well over 50,000 tons if I remember right, and this fishery supported several thousand people, but not anymore. This grand remote-controlled development plan resulted in an enormous environmental disaster which put paid to two ways of life, and in their place, left human dispair. Yes, they including the bolsheviks are chockful of verbal respect for other cultures. But, when are they going to show it by deeds? Lal Manavado.  From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org]Sent: 11 March 2016 13:36To: Lal ManavadoSubject: [World We Want 2030] LUMONA MZEE KIBORE Secretary General from Tanzania, United Republic of commented on the Discussion "The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: scope and implications"

LUMONA MZEE KIBORE (not verified)

Dear Moderator,

First I would like to appreciate this type of e-discussion that is very useful platform to the UNECOSOC & UNDP as  well as member countries ratified all the UN convention  and Instruments i,e the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) of 1979, the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) of 1989, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) of 2006, and the Convention Against Discrimination in Education (CADE) of 1960,the convention on the rights of indigenous peoples, the convention on the democratic governance and social-economic rights ,the convention on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) and Inter- national Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR).

All member countries they agreed that will respect all the       UN convention and instruments. That shall be directed to the full development of the human personality and the sense of its dignity, and shall strengthen the respect for human rights, rule of the law, good governance and fundamental freedoms.

 

Through this e-discussions platform I hope that we can influence the SDG’s 2016-2030 directions in implementing the 2030 Agenda in different countries.

 

 My comment and advices is on three issues (1) Corruption in Africa Countries as an obstacle for eradicating poverty and advancing sustainable development focusing on people,(2)Poor governance systems and un obey of rule of law,(3)Poor democracy.

 

How could the UN development system could engaging and working together with civil society organization to make an intervention for the achievement of the 2030 Agenda?, especially in country where there’s no democracy,abuse human rights, doesn’t obey the rule of the law,use power to run the country and citizens has no say to choose their leader they want, misuse of public funds for political interest and there’s no freedom of expression.

 

1.The impact of corruption.

Corruption and misuse of public funds directly causes poverty and hinders social development, In Tanzania Corruption in the context of economic reforms programme stifle economic growth; reduce economic efficiency and development despite the enormous resources in the country. Corruption creates negative national image and loss of much needed revenue. It devalues the quality of human life, robs schools, agricultural sectors, hospital and welfare services of funds. In some areas service delivery is very poor like in police and judiciary corruption seems to be very high. It discourages foreign investments leading to decrease in Foreign Direct Investment. It exacerbates inequality, desecrates the rule of law and undermines the legitimacy and stability of democratic regimes. It slows down administrative processes thereby making the implementation of government reforms policies ineffective. In other country I can say that may be people engage in corrupt practices in as a result of high level of poverty, high unemployment rate, under-remuneration of workers, financial hardship, persuasion by friends and colleagues in public offices, desire to please kinsmen, late payment of contractors by government, over-concentration of power and resources and unregulated informal economy. In Tanzania the biggest challenge for the country is corruption among service providers. The country must reverse the prevailing culture in which corruption is viewed as permissible. People should be educated on tracking corruption and public funds which is our key role as civil society.

 

In other country especially in the Great Lakes Region (GLR), corruption, poor good governance and poor democracy has created some of member states in the African Great Lakes Region, namely Angola, Burundi, the Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Kenya, Rwanda, Sudan and  Uganda caused political instability and conflicts in these countries have a considerable regional dimension and thus that the promotion of sustainable peace and development would require a concerted joint effort and an entry point is 2030 Agenda?,

 

For a long time the Great Lakes Region has been home to some of Africa’s most intractable and turbulent conflicts. Over a 22-year period, this region has experienced, among others, genocide in some countries, civil war in Burundi, and cross-border conflict in the DRC, all of which have been exacerbated by illegal armed groups from within and outside the region resulting poverty to its people.

 

Continued violent conflict has resulted in humanitarian crises, an upsurge of displaced populations and poverty from loss  of livelihoods and security, include the illegal exploitation of natural resources, sexual and gender-based violence, population displacement. The conflicts persist with profound effects on communities and stability in the region.

 

Policy development, democracy and good governance should be given more priority because currently most of their people in rural areas are behind the development steps. You can find people in rural areas are living a very poor life, with no better health services, education and even roads, How can we improve the livelihood of the people without improvement of their health services, education, achieving gender equality and empowerment of women and girls, reducing inequality, combating climate change and build peace if the conflicts still persist in the Great Lakes Region.

 

It’s now a time each country in Africa and developed countries to incorporate SDGs 2030 Agenda? into their National policies and development Plans with full participation.

 

Lumona Kibore/Secretary General

Social Economic and Governance Promotion Centre

Dar es salaam,Tanzania

E-mail:segpcentre@gmail.com

 

Dr.Amb.Asabe Shehu Yar'Adua • President and Founder of Asabe Shehu Yar'Adua Foundation at Asabe Shehu Yar'Adua Foundation from Nigeria

Challenges of ensuring coherence of Sustainable Development.

At the International level, the challenges of ensuring coherence of Sustainable Development among the Nations includes:

(1) Embargoes and Sanctions on Unilateral, Bilateral and Multilateral Realtions ( Economic, Political and Social). Where there is sanction or embargo on economic and political relations and cooperation, especially between the Least Developed, Developing and Developed Countries; the principle of "leave no one behind" can not be realized by 2030. This economic sanction has devastating effect on the receiver and is one of the challenges that should be taking seriously.

(2) Terrorism: Terrorism is one of the biggest challenges that the World is currently battling with. Any policy or efforts geared toward realizing the principle of "leave no one behind" by 2030, that has not been taken into consideration the effect of terrorism on National and International Policy; is futile. Fight/war against terrorism should be proritized and enforced Nationally and Internationally, so that the principle of SDGs 2030, to carry everyone along will be achieved.

(3) Corruption: Corrupt practices exist at International level. Some Developed Nations and Developing Nations have aided influential politicians from Least Developed Countries to sophony and transfer huge sums of monies from the public treasurery to the Developing and Developed Countries. Thereby, deverting funds made for public good into private accounts. This acts should be frowned at, if the principle of "leave no one behind" by 2030 is to be achieved.

The onus is on the shoulder of the Developed Countries to help the Developing and Least Developed Countries in coordinating, formulating and implementing economic policies in line with the International best practice of ensuring leave no one behind. Any policy programmes of the Developing and Least Developed Countries without the backing or help of the Developed Countries, the policy will not see the light of the day.

In line with this argument, the Developing and Least Developed Countires should wake up, be ready to deal with the realities on ground, other than hoping that manna will fall from above. As the Developed Countries has a part to play, also the Developing and Least Developed Countries has even greater role to play. The beneficiaries of this healthy economic relations is Developing and Least Developed Countries. The SDG 2030 Agenda will be more beneficial to Developing and Least Developed Countries if achieved by 2030, more healthy International relations is needed from Developed Countries. 

LUMONA MZEE KIBORE (not verified)

Dear Moderator,

I would like to add more  my contribution regarding this UN e-discussion  on 2030 Agenda that is very useful platform to the UNECOSOC & UNDP as  well as a civil society organizations to present our concern regarding achieving the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for sustainable development. This platform is a good place to influence the SDG’s 2016-2030 directions in implementing the 2030 Agenda in member countries.

 

My commentary inputs looks on four issues to achieve the implementing 2030 Agenda for sustainable development:

  1. Eradicating poverty and advancing  sustainable development
  2. Achieving gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls and Reducing inequality within and among countries
  3. Combating climate change
  4. Peaceful  building  and Engagement of all actors, coordination and policies integration at the national, regional and global levels.

My worries are in developing countries especially in our Africa continent in implementing the 2030 Agenda due to challenges associated to policies, corruption, poor governance, political instability, civil war, poor democratic governance, many African leaders tends to remain in power by force. Some are Dictatorship countries lies in social or economic conditions which led to the adoption of Democracy and Dictatorship as forms of government respectively.

  1. Eradicating poverty and advancing sustainable development.

-       African states experienced high economic growth during the 2000s due to good macroeconomic management, growth in trade, mine, gold, tourist, and foreign investment into oil-rich states. However, this growth did not coincide with poverty elimination among marginalized groups include indigenous communities, because it was not linked to activities and economic sectors that affect the poor especially in rural areas where most of their people relies in agriculture for 86% as source of income. Further development plans must make economic opportunities available for a greater portion of the population include marginalized groups, ethnic groups, by creating jobs, promote human rights and justice for all, provide education, promote good governance and democracy, fight corruption, increase transparency and accountability among service provider, promote women participation in leadership position and decision making bodies, obey rule of the law, increase food security, improve infrastructure, combating climate change, increase social services and supporting local production, increase budgetary allocations in the priority sectors of education, health, water and sanitation and poverty reduction which provide the basic needs for the poor and the marginalized.

 

-       Increase the number of African children attending school include from indigenous and pastoralists communities, hunters/gathers still who do not have access to education.

 

-       Reform the policies to address the inequalities that reserve the best resources and education for the wealthiest and leave other children with ill-equipped and poorly financed schools

 

  1. 2.    Achieving gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls.

-       Integrate gender equality in  all programme and policy to reaffirms gender equality as a crosscutting theme throughout.

 

-       Given that the majority of the poor in Sub- Saharan Africa are women and gender inequalities hinder development, growth and poverty reduction in a multitude of ways,  donors   need  to make extra efforts to work with partners to address gender inequalities.

 

-       The principles of aid effectiveness can provide tremendous opportunities for development partners (DPs) to influence the policy-making and planning agenda, to ensure that national development strategies adequately integrate strategies and resources for women’s empowermen and  gender  equality.    Opportunities  for DPs and developing countries to work together   to   advance   gender   equality require concrete human and financial resources, accountability systems, and gender-sensitive progress assessments, performance monitoring and indicators. Without them, new aid modalities may serve to reinforce existing gender inequalities.

 

-       Policy dialogue requires: an understanding of the policy context; developing alliances and a shared vision with partners on gender equality; and systematically advocating that gender equality issues be concretely addressed.

 

-       Advocating for the voices of women to be heard. Engaging with governments on their commitments made to CEDAW, the Beijing Platform for Action, the African Charter of Human and Peoples’ Rights on the Rights of Women in Africa, etc.Collaborating closely with other like-minded donors and harmonizing key messages and support for gender equality.

 

-       Ensure that gender equality sector-based results and indicators are developed and integrated in PBA frameworks.

 

-       Participate with other like-minded donors on gender equality in sector working groups or roundtables and increase policy dialogue and joint support for gender equality initiatives.

 

-       Advocate for and support development of a specific gender equality strategy and investment line for the sector.

  1. 3.    Combating climate change.

-       Countries should work to recover  greenish forest, environmental degradation and adaption of climate change and enhanced  local  awareness  and  support  for  biodiversity conservation and adaption of climate change, promote  sustainable  use  of  natural resources  adjacent  communities. Local  communities should be  involved  in  enforcing  existing  by – laws and  legislation  of  new ones to safeguard forest and water sources .

 

-       Countries to Integrate conservation  plan  for forest resources and land , control of upland soil and slope erosion and  Ecosystem  management.

 

-       Improve agriculture growth and productivity  shift from subsistence to commercial agriculture  involved in climate smart agriculture. This will help to create the best system of  biodeversity conservation  intervention on how to arrest the problem of environmental degradation caused by economic activities. Will improve sustainable utilization of forest products by encouraging community members around forests to find alternative sources of income, for farmer to engage in climate smart agriculture. Will assist  farmers,communities and local surrounding the forest  come to learn and disseminate best technologies of climate smart agriculture and biodiversity conservation .

BY addressing climate change the is in line with countries  strategy of establishing a national REDD strategy to reduce emissions resulting from deforestation and forest degradation due to biomass consumption, illegal logging and the expansion of the agricultural sector.

Agricultural development is further driven by the belief that the agricultural sector is the main driver of economic development in many African country.

 

-       Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD) strategy, will reduce deforestation,  enhance  climate  change  mitigation,  improve  community  livelihoods  and address poverty.

This strategy will resulting to achieve the followings (i) maintain a healthy agriculture sector with viable alternatives to climate smart farming , (ii) generate sustainable off-farm and self-employment opportunities for rural poo peopler, (iii) to facilitate livelihood activities and improve the quality of life, and (iv) provide critical farm access  for rural communities

 

  1. 4.    Peaceful  building

You cannot brings development if there’s no peace and security Peace building   is   a   simultaneously   short-,  mid-   and  long-term   process,   aimed   at   peace consolidation.  It involves a range of multidimensional and inter-related programmes and activities that   collectively   and   cumulatively   bring   about   security,   political  stability,   socio-economic development and reconciliation, that address both the consequences and the causes of a conflict, and lays the foundation for sustainable peace.

-       Countries  should enhancing   coherence   and  coordination   in  peacebuilding in those countries where there’s no peace   with  the  aim  of  promoting  and enhancing  local  ownership  in  peacebuilding  processes,  as  well as  supporting  the  design and implementation of peacebuilding policy frameworks.

-       Build the  capacity of peacebuilding agents it is engaging with, including and  most  especially  local  actors. 

-       Enhancing  coherence  and coordination,  developing  local capacity, encouraging local ownership and designing and implementing new and innovative  peacebuilding approaches. Mainstreaming gender in peace building , design and implementation.

 

-       International  peace builders conducting research visits to the four focus countries, as well as identifying, meeting and interacting with key peace building  actors;

 

-       Hosting consultation forums and thematic  dialog  roundtables, drawing together a wide range of peace building stakeholders; and

 

-       Conducting  training  courses  for representatives  of non-governmental organizations (NGOs), government agencies and line ministries, development partners, the United Nations system, inter-governmental  organisations and other stakeholders.

 

-       Enhanced  levels  of  coherence  and  coordination,  and the  generation  of a  deeper understanding of peacebuilding  challenges and responses through:

 

-       By hosting  policy  workshops,  drawing  together  key  representatives  from  the  focus countries and inter-governmental organisations;

 

-       Engagement with peacebuilding stakeholders at the level of the African Union (AU), United   Nations   (UN),   inter-governmental   organisations,   diplomatic   community, development partners and others; and

 

-       Conducting  joint training courses for peacebuilding practitioners  and policy-makers impacting on the focus countries.

 

-       Peacebuilding processes must be gendered because they involve the reassignment of power and resources (both human and material), which influence policy development.  UN  Security  Council should also involved

-       Mainstream gender in all aspects of its activities, and to provide a forum for information sharing on lessons learnt and best practices.

 

If all above issues could be worked on it, we will achieve the implementation of SDGs 2030 Agenda and eradicating poverty in Africa and advancing sustainable development.

 

The big problem we have is that, democracy in Africa is laughable. The presumption that everyone is equal in the eyes of the law, or has an equal voice in the governing of their country turns a blind eye to the realities of our continent. In light of this, there are those who support the idea that African states need benevolent dictators.

A benevolent dictator is one whose authoritarian leadership is exercised for the benefit of a nation, and not for his or her own self betterment, or for the benefit of the few. While the leader might allow for some democratic decision making, the benevolent dictator has the last word in determining the direction and governance of a country. Unfortunately, in this day and age, when one hears of the word “dictator”, automatically, come to mind. Their brutal and inhumane assertions of power, which have left millions dead in their wake, create a fear for any leader that is or can be viewed as a kind of dictator. So, in light of this, should African states entertain the idea of a benevolent dictator, or should we simply strive for true democracies by economically empowering the common people?

Democracy in Africa is a mere transplant of democracy in the western world. As a result, we should not be surprised when a model, which was successful in the west, fails in African states. An alien democratic model flooded by consistent aid donations, has futhered corruption and the oppression of the economically marginalized. Further, the models presume that the African people have an equal say in the governing of their countries. Which is not true?

 

Goodbye;

I love my continent; I love my country Tanzania, We African let we work together to eradicating poverty in our continent and improve social wellbeing of our people. Demanding leadership change by removing or delete all African leader dictators through ballot paper, yes we can

 

 

 Lumona Kibore/Secretary General,

Social Economic and Governance Promotion Centre(SEGP)

P.box 4114,Dar es salaam,Tanzania

Tel:255 754 689451/255 653 780310

E-mail:segpcentre@gmail.com

Kivumbi Earnest Benjamin (not verified)

I would like to extend our deep heartfelt appreciations for this forum on the UN 2030 Agenda. Heal The Planet Global Organisation is coming up with ideas that we ganna upoald here before deadline at the moment however we would like to pass a vote of thanks.

Hon Kivumbi Earnest Benjamin

President & Founder

Heal The Planet

 

P O Box 3977 Kampala Uganda

 

Mobile: +256702137566 (Uganda)

              +256773137566 (Uganda)

              +256713137566 (Uganda)

              +256793137566 (Uganda)

              +256752137566 (Uganda)

              +254729829065 (Kenya)

              +255765911626 (Tanzania)

Email: healdeplanet@gmail.com

            africapresident@presidency.com

 

Physical Adress: Namasuba Kikajjo Zone, Off Entebbe Rd- Kampala Uganda

 

Website: http://www.healdeplanet.webs.com

 

SUZANA G • Doctor Professor at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro from Brazil

Dear Diana Alarcon, Discussion Moderator, thank you for the opportunity of collaborating and congratulations for your perception on challenging issues. It called my attention the one related to

the Guiding Principle of Leaving no one behind.  As our discussion includes both local and global insights, I would call attention to a current problem that affects developing countries as a social cancer: corruption. In despite of whatever brilliant solution there might be, if not culturally blended by a strong and inspiring will of making a change and cutting off the gordian knot of vicious cycle of greed and corruption, our society will remain in the fate of environmental injustice and social disparities illuded by limited projects with unlimited fundings which may not necessarily be addressed effectively or even reach the ones in need.

For such, there are some topics which I consider to be strategic in the design of inclusion to sustainability:

1. State of art education for policy-makers and a minimun of acknowledgments for other stakeholders in order to provide awarenness of what are the projects, the environmental and social benchmarkings, and what are the goals to a continuos improvement. An example could be the relevance of Life Cycle Assessment and ecodesign for urban solutions, specially when considerign which projects should be funded in order not to have safety and security compromised, such as risk areas and the land slides risks posing death risks to local income population. Awarenness can only be given through education, and that should be a priority to evaluate which projects will be funded.

2. The Fundings of Projects and the United Nations role on the implementation. What are the projects, what are the local x global goals atributes of sustainability and how can we provide trust, confidence, on the effectivenness of the design and execution of the proposals. Track the fundings and the results are strategic to monitor the benefits to the goal of "leave no one behind", in order to protect in an accurate pathway, on how the investment are being addressed and to cut off from the great sustainable inspired projects the culture of corruption.

mustapha Ma (not verified)

HOW CAN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AGENDA BE ASSURED WHEN NATIONAL BUDGET FOR DEFENCE/OFFENCE

ARE EXHORBITANT?

Lal Manavado • Senior Advisor at undefined from Norway

Correction, my apologies to Mr. Mustapha. I got your name wrong and typed, 'Mr. Mohamed' when it should have been Mr. Mustapha. My apologies. Lal Manavado. From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org]Sent: 15 March 2016 04:16To: Lal ManavadoSubject: [World We Want 2030] mustapha Ma Retired from Malaysia commented on the Discussion "The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: scope and implications"

mustapha Ma (not verified)

HOW CAN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AGENDA BE ASSURED WHEN NATIONAL BUDGET FOR DEFENCE/OFFENCE

ARE EXHORBITANT?

Lal Manavado • Senior Advisor at undefined from Norway

How to avoid the embarrassing question of military expenditure First move is to take refuge behind the ploy, saying that this is an internal matter and any external interference on defence expenditure constitutes an attempted violation of national sovereignty. If this does not work, especially if the country is not a major power, then one can always blame the necessity for it on one's unfriendly neighbours. Another excellent way to avoid cutting down military expenditure is to point to the need to fight terrorism. But the two most important reasons for not reducing defence budget are, the need to return one's thanks for donations to finance one's election campaign by ordering more armaments, or some political leader's total dependence on their armed forces to remain in power. You are right, Mr. Mohamed,  defence budgets bite off a considerable chunk of the scarce financial resources most countries have at their disposal. Lal Manavado. From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org]Sent: 15 March 2016 04:16To: Lal ManavadoSubject: [World We Want 2030] mustapha Ma Retired from Malaysia commented on the Discussion "The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: scope and implications"

mustapha Ma (not verified)

The biggest single human expenditure is for armament.  Name it as Defence, security or insecurity the bottom line is destruction of property, killing or maiming human lives.  Malaysia advocates to Criminalise all wars, Civil wars(what an abuse of the word "civil"), bilateral, regional, international or world wars. Mus

On 15 Mar 2016 16:16, <notification@unteamworks.org> wrote:

Yo

Melaku Geleta Wakjira (not verified)

Mainstreaming SDG’s within national sustainable development policies

By Melaku Geleta Wakjira

DRR-LR program coordinator

UNDP Ethiopia

melaku_geleta@hotmail.com

Dear Moderator, on top of what has been shared last weeks, I suggest the following points to be considered to refine more on the issues & the discussions towards suggesting the “how” question in the SDG’s mainstreaming process within countries national sustainable development polices.      

  1. One of the critical challenges for SDG’s implementations is the basic and fundamental difference between countries in all aspects. Even though one of the SDG’s designed to work against this problem, i.e. to narrow a gap, this may not be simple task as we think for the following reasons.

 

  • Countries are living in different political systems and zones
  • Countries are pursuing different growth and development ideologies
  • Countries are dependent on  different national priorities
  • Countries have different economic and social standards best fit to the achieved and aspired  economic growth and development  

 

  1. The other critical challenge for SDG’s implementation is the type of plans countries having this day, i.e. the development and growth plans are differ from countries to countries 1. By the type of the plan, 2. By duration of the plan 3. By issues and priorities to be addressed in the plan 4. By goal of the plan.

 

  1.  The commonalties and differences among countries are diversified; hence, we have to check if the followings are fully or partially available within a specific country to think of” how “to mainstream SDG’s within the national plans & policies. NOTE: Some countries have at least 1 national roadmap or  perspective plan or  and indicative plan or  master plan for which all are operating beyond 10 years and above implementation time.  Within these contexts, again so many irregularities and inconsistencies are exist; however, to respond to the question “how” in general, we can do the mainstreaming work at least in areas identified as bellow. It is good to examine the SDG’s, targets and key indicators across areas summarized under this part.  
  • What types of perspective plan 15-20 years,  what development plan 3-7 years are available (we have to make sure if the perspective plan is available, if so, to know to what extent the plan have accommodated elements of SDG’s is very priority;  if not think how to bring the SDG’s  to the scene and think about mainstreaming. Then proceed to continue the mainstreaming issues with the  development plan usually  covers 3-7 years
  • What social security policy available for sustainable income and decent life, to what extent these are based on the principles of inclusive development, what elements of SDG’s can be mainstreamed in the coming 15 years?       
  • What social service policy available? to what extent the rule of  equity and equality are pinpointed in the policy?   What elements of SDG’s can be mainstreamed in the coming 15 years? Within this streamline    
  • Economic policy (for trade, industry, tourism) do we have a chance to think of SDG’s mainstreaming?
  • Infrastructure development policy; etc.
  • Natural resource development and protection policy; etc.
  • Land use and land management policy; etc.
  • Green economy policy/ green growth policy; etc.
  • Cultural policy; etc.  
  • Energy policy; etc.
  • Rural development policy; etc.
  • Urban development policy; etc.
  • National security & foreign policy; etc.
  • Political system & good governance policy; etc.
  • Political and economic decentralization policy; etc.

   

Paul Shaw (not verified)

Thanks for your excellent post Melaku - combining the SDGs with National Development Plans, the 'Future We Want' 2063 agenda and the complications of corruption, tax avoidance, war and conflict and political instability do indeed muddy the water, but we have to start somehow, and for The Network of African Youths for Development #NAYDSDGs agenda with our focus on empowering African rural communities through youth-led collaboration, it is a step in the right direction. Many of the activities our teams of Community Build Organisations already carry out are sustainable development activities, they simply don't have an SDG logo on them. The difference from Jan 1st 2016 is that the world now has a focus on leaving no-one behind, so our teams know they can count on global support as they continue with their work, which means a great deal.   

 

From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org] Sent: 15 March 2016 07:02To: paul@geovision.co.ukSubject: [Teamworks] Melaku Geleta Wakjira Current Disaster Risk Management Program Coordinator from Ethiopia commented on the Discussion "The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: scope and implications"

 

You can post a reply on Teamworks

Dr. Kalima F. Abdul-Quddus (not verified)

Between the years of 2009 and 2013; I had been a volunteer in support of an NGO of the United Nations Headquarters, New York- USA.  I had watched to learn from afar from several other programs as they transitioned and made headway inside of the Millennium Development Goal Agendas all the while remaining in compliance within the confines of the Charter of the United Nations;  through to the current 2030 Agenda for the Sustainable Development.  

There could be no better time for me to participate as it is of my very nature to offer my services in teaching about inclusive meritocracy, lifting and helping to equalize the fair treatment of People of Color- 'Descendants of African Slaves in America’, Disenfranchised population across our world, and in helping to raise a flag in dedication to the people who help make America what it has become today.  

If we say that we are The United Nations; then by all means we must be the very charter in which we preach.  If we say that, “the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development speaks to the core mandate and values of the UN system, to include the promotion and encouragement and overall respect for the human rights of all people and without discrimination”, then let is show this to indeed be the truth.  Let us prove that after having voted twice for a half Black President that we are big enough to raise a flag in honor of People of Color- Descendants of African Slaves in America’; help others to have access to resources that will help them lead more productive lives, and that we can be tolerant of others.

My goal is to sit on the panel alongside the UNDM and attend all State of the Union Addresses and other relevant meetings onsite in order to do my part during the period of the Millennium Development Goals.  We have indeed grown so much but we still have a long way to go.   The time has come to stand for what we consistently preach about; when discussing Human Rights and Humanitarian objectives.

If you wish to contact me for more information about what I am doing; please feel free to contactme via this email address: TheSAFECampaign at gmail dot com.  I look forward to learning from you.

Best Regards-

 

Dr. Kalima F. Abdul-QuddusPresident/Founder/Program DirectorThe SAFE Campaign LLC

Dr. Timothy Barker (not verified)

Hello everybody,

I apologise for joining the discussion late. I additionally have to apologise for not having read the main document yet. To be honest I had to query what exactly the 2030 Agenda was. I am vaguely aware of the SDGs and other UN level initiatives having been involved in their predecessors in various capacities (MDGs, etc.) However, I wasn't entirely certain what the 2030 Agenda was. I now have the key document thanks to the help of the forum organisers but its 41 pages or so long. One has to wonder why but I think the 'devil is in the detail' so I intend doing my homework before commenting substantially. That said, I just read the moderators summing up of the first weeks comments. I think there were obviously some pertinent discussions but I am seriously concerned that technology seems to be stressed as a 'silver bullet' to 'development problems'. I learned a long time ago that there is no silver bullet and certainly it will never be technology (it brings as many problems as solutions to the table). I helped start an organisation to champion renewable energy to power ICTs in rural Kenya. That was some years ago now. I am in the process of writing up our successes and failures. I often say that 'development' is a problem of structures. Recently I thought that - from a network theory perspective, at least - its about disconnects. That is ostensibly what I witnessed in rural Kenya: people were effectively 'cut off' from the rest of the world; unable to gain capital (in its myriad forms). So, we tried to help through technological and associated means. As I said, there were successes but failures too. I feel people think of technology as some kind of 'magic' some times? I believe its ultimately people that will make the differences needed. I see technology and education as tools to work towards reorienting people's values and judgements, etc. towards each other. Anyway, I intend to try to find time to read all of the materials produced seemingly by presently unknown UN people and colleagues here in these forums. Maybe then I can produce something of more substance! Thanks.

Lal Manavado • Senior Advisor at undefined from Norway

Hello, Dr. Baker, I can't agree more with you when you question  the suitability of technology as the panacea to world's woes. Indeed, how easy for some to overlook that technology often  reduces the number of available jobs, and for a less affluent country with high unemployment, this would be obviously disastrous. How easy is it to confuse one's pet advocacy with what people plagued by hunger, disease, lack of shelter and security, lack of a chance to obtain an appropriate education want. For a light-hearted sketch of the current world situation that ought to shame us, you might like to  see my  yesterday's  contribution (?) to this forum called, "Time for a Story." Cheers! Lal Manavado. From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org]Sent: 16 March 2016 17:11To: Lal ManavadoSubject: [World We Want 2030] Dr. Timothy Barker from United Kingdom commented on the Discussion "The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: scope and implications"

Melaku Geleta Wakjira (not verified)

Holistic to specific corruption fighting approach &strategy

By Melaku Geleta

DRR & LR Program Coordinator

UNDP Ethiopia 

Dear facilitator and Akaaash thank you very much for bringing  the issues of corruption to the seen which in fact we all have raised in our past weeks discussions at comprehensive level . I think we need to do more probing on this to deal with issues of corruption. We need to sharpen our understanding on the subject for organized and effective solutions. It is with this understanding that I am taking some steps to elaborate the challenge and a remedial action.

General Recommendation to UN and its alliances to stop corruption 2016-2030: If we are very determine to fight corruption; I suggest the UN should think as early as possible (before SDG’s implementation) on how to bring additional UN structure such as UN corruption court with global and international mandate. UN must define international bill for corruption, set international standard to measure its international impacts, code of conduct for its management, above all needs to set international accountability measures and check and balance system between governments, public sectors, private sectors , CSO’s and the UN that must be approved by UN general assembly. To me corruption is not less than genocide, international war crime, etc. I suggest this because, corrupters are taking public resources, smuggling national resources to the third country, destroy national interests & natural resources for narrow and private needs, they use this resources for further human right abuses, where women are dying needs of clean and potable water, where children are dying of malnutrition, where thousands are choosing less dignified life standard because of unemployment, poor governances. It causes civil unrest. Hence UN should think of new structure, International corruption court. We need the general assembly to be active in these areas.

In addition to what I have recommended above, the UN should provide a chance to the international organizations or CSO’s to have a role that they can play beyond conventional consultation process. As to me, these organizations should be given a defined role to fight corruption internationally and globally. I am sure this will bring additional power to the UN to stop corruption in the coming years, SDG’s 2016-2013.The system and a framework that applied on how the CSO’s play a role needs to be defined and approved by UN general assembly. The structure suggested should go down to UN country offices, but must be deigned on how to compliment the international corruption court role at global level including corruption reporting systems.

By Melaku Geleta

DRR & LR Program Coordinator

UNDP Ethiopia  

Melaku Geleta Wakjira (not verified)

The Role of the UN in SDG’s mainstreaming both at policy and implementation level.

By: Melaku Geleta

DRR & LR Program Coordinator

UNDP Ethiopia              

Dear moderator, thank you for a request for elaborations. I think, as UN we have been giving a technical supports in the past for so many years. But this time, the support from the UN to countries must go beyond giving a support for what all proposed by governments. The technical support from the UN agencies, especially in policy development and SDG’s mainstreaming should be a challenging, a facilitative and follow a mutual accountable process. I suggest these approaches because; sometimes the development policies are derived by ‘individual’s ambitions” regardless of addressing the national context, reality or priorities for which the UN must be equally accountable. Meager resources are utilized for not national priority interventions or less strategic agendas. We have to make a clear demarcation between “commercial & needy” agendas.  There are some observation that, countries with less human and financial resources are found to be the most extravagant one in using national resources for less priority programs, because of its commercial advantage regardless of its neediness. In addition to UNDAF development sessions, I suggest, the UN country offices must play a pivotal role and initiate joint priority setting sessions, through giving technical support in the areas of commissioning big researches, inviting research institutions to step in as a solution providers, injecting and trade meaningful international cooperation’s, informed policy development practices, in depth problem analysis, through giving sharpened recommendations etc. While countries prepare development policies, or implement policies, this must be considered from SDG’s mainstreaming angle. If the UN failed to provide such technical support to the countries, it is clear that less relevant policies will continue to be implemented to heal the symptom without addressing the root causes, which is not the case of SDG’s 2016-2030.

On top of the upper policy level engagements, depends up on the specific country structures, it is wise to cascade down to the subnational, regional or sub regional level the notion behind SDG’s mainstreaming. Once the policy level task is properly managed, the UN support at implementation level must be well defined and prepared as parts of SDG’s implementation and mainstreaming packages. I believe the UN could delivery on the later one as well because there are at least 1 and more than 1 UN agencies responsible to give a technical support to one of the 17 SDG’s. In these contexts, the SDG’s mainstreaming challenges would be solved at two levels (at policy and implementation levels). For the pater one the implementation package is critically important to assure to what extend the SDG’s are mainstreamed.

Melaku Geleta

DRR & LR Program Coordinator

UNDP Ethiopia              

Dr. Timothy Barker (not verified)

Hello everybody again and especially Lal Manavado,

I don't think we need to begin to think "holism" is not being considered. Systems Thinking was mentioned in these pages somewhere or perhaps I read it in the main Agenda 2030 document. Certainly Lal Manavado is keeping that perspective alive. Me too except I usually refer to it as Complexity or Complex Systems, etc. these days. Its all pretty much a similar philosohpy. For me this perspective is important for although the detail of every participant's ideas is obviously crucial to include in a truly democratic and participative manner - the whole ethos behind these forums, presumably - at the level of the UN etc. I believe we would be wise to think if we can generalise beyond the detail for transferrable lessons which can truly be applied in the spirit of the 'universal' (as much as I would like to debate that!) founding principles of the UN. Additionally, I would like to say that if we were to go down the systems/holistic/complexity path then there are tools available to help with that generalisability. Network theory I already mentioned in my previous post. It offers some rather neat tools e.g. to visualise networks. We wrote a paper on this approach to community intervention which offered insights into such modelling of social structures...Anyhow, I just wished to encourage Lal Manavado in particular that all is not quite lost just yet with regard to 'holisism'. Thanks.

Abiodun Ogundipe (not verified)

Dear Madam, Has UN implemented what he has at hands, Because I believe in actions. That is when we can have tangible things to delibrate upon. Let us know what UN has adopted first.

Effort should be made to third world countries like Africa and others especially on how to imitate the developed countries. When this is looked into, then poverty will be reduced. We can just bedelibrating on what is/are not happening

Abiodun Ogundipe from Nigeria.

Tokunbo Lijadu-Oyemade (not verified)

Please see my post above.  This forum is a discussion forum on the SDG's or global agenda 2030.  They were adopted in September, 2015.  A total of 17 Goals and 162 Targets.  Domestication into National Plans and Programmes is squarely the responsibility of individual governments not that of the United Nations.  Government of course needs our help to be effective.

Lal Manavado • Senior Advisor at undefined from Norway

Another little but vital point to remember, Mr. Lejadu It is rather risky to plan the 'development' of an abstract entity like a 'country' for a very simple reason. Once you do that, your natural impulse is to 'measure' (very fashionable, makes what one does look very 'scientific') your results on a nation-wide basis. In almost every case, this measurement is in monetary and/production terms. And it is there the good old 'leaving behind the people' begins. It is so obvious; If 10% of a country's population should become multi-millionaires who own great deal more of land's resources and producion facilities while 25% of the population sinks below the poverty level,  countries economy will show an 'upswing' which is going to swing a lot of people in a less attractive way. So,  if we don't want to leave anyone behind, we have no choice but to use a method of human improvement that does not use measurable economy as its principal tool, and economic growth as its cardinal indicator.  Lal Manavado. From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org]Sent: 17 March 2016 22:11To: Lal ManavadoSubject: [World We Want 2030] Tokunbo Lijadu-Oyemade Country President, NIGERIA from Nigeria commented on the Discussion "The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: scope and implications"

Dr.Amb.Asabe Shehu Yar'Adua • President and Founder of Asabe Shehu Yar'Adua Foundation at Asabe Shehu Yar'Adua Foundation from Nigeria

Corruption is every where ,We can't fight corruption,we can only reduce corruption to make the world a better place.Dr Amb Asabe Shehu Yar'Adua President/FounderAsabe Shehu Yar'Adua Foundation.www.asyarf.orgAsabe Shehu Yar'Adua Foundation (ASYARF)www.asabeshehuyaraduafoundation.orgwww.asyarf.orginfo@asyarf.orgSkype: asyarf1On Fri, Mar 18, 2016 at 8:11 AM, <notification@unteamworks.org> wrote:

Y

Tokunbo Lijadu-Oyemade (not verified)

Dear Amb. Asabe, 

Agreed, corruption is everywhere.  Nevertheless, we can mitigate the negative impact of corruption on the development policy formulations and programme direction at all levels of governments.  We cannot and should not fold our arms.  Our take at KINSAF is that there is a dire need to undertake a total re-orientation of Public Officers in particular because of their entrusted responsibility for Policy Formulation, implementation and monitoring and evaluation.  If we do not see this as an effective approach to "managing" and eventually reduce the influence of corruption in national decision making process, there will be little or no achievement in the direction of development and more so in the implementation of the SDG's.

As Developing Countries, this is the direction we should be working towards if our economies would ever come close to or measure-up to more developed economies on any scale of measurement. 

In this regard, it is worthwhile to consider a CSO-Led National Public Service Award which would anchored on a reliable research and consistent and continuous training and capacity building of Public Service Personnel.  We believe that if application of Ethics, Values, Standards and Norms in public service delivery was achieved at the Public Sector level, the Private Sector would gradually conform since the latter have to operate within the Policy Environment and enablement provided by the Public Sector.

Dr.Amb.Asabe Shehu Yar'Adua • President and Founder of Asabe Shehu Yar'Adua Foundation at Asabe Shehu Yar'Adua Foundation from Nigeria

Lijadu Oyemade,If corruption can be curb,the world would be a better place.Dr Amb Asabe Shehu Yar'AduaFounder/President of Asabe Shehu Yar'Adua Foundation(ASYARF)Asabe Shehu Yar'Adua Foundation (ASYARF)www.asabeshehuyaraduafoundation.orgwww.asyarf.orginfo@asyarf.orgSkype: asyarf1On Fri, Mar 18, 2016 at 11:27 AM, <notification@unteamworks.org> wrote:

Tokunbo Lijadu-Oyemade (not verified)

Absolutely; we must  remain forward-looking.  Corruption will fail to defeat our efforts at development and the world will be a better place.

Tokunbo Lijadu-Oyemade (not verified)

Thank you Mr. Lai  Manavado,

You are very correct, in your informed suggestion that non-measurable economy be adopted as principal for creating human improvement that doesn't use measurable tool but focus on economic growth as its cardinal indicator.  

This makes so much sense particularly in regards to Deviloping Economies and Fragile States.  This I believe is the "raison d'etre" for the notion of "leave no one behind" adopted this time within the SDG's as well as the "Bottom-Up" approach to Sustainable Development which is the suggested modus of implementation.  

As is globally acknowledged, the rural populace is mostly left behind in Development Planning particularly at the stage of execution of national plans.  They are seemingly planned for but are not priority at implementation stage .  Consequently, they are the ones "left behind".  They're the ones that live without portable water supply, without motorable roads, without electricity,  without access to affordable Health Care clinics much less hospitals among other basic amenities and infrastructures that make for inclusive participation in national development and implicitely left out of the benefits of such development.  In some parts of the developing world, the rural populace remains confused as to their true nationalities and this relates particularly to the rural population in border towns.  They are mostly remembered at electioneering campaigns and election times and forgotten thereafter.  

It is also common knowledge that emphasis of National Plans in most of the developing world is oftentimes Urban Based.  Meanwhile up to 70% of the national population resides and "make their living" tilling the soil in the rural communities and up to 40% of this rural population are women tilling the soil.

Nevertheless, the challenge is not without solution.  The solution is in the effectiveness and empowerment of the multidisciplinary and multisectoral Civil Societies Organizations that operate in these rural communities.  These Civil Societies Organisations focus and emphasize human improvement but their activities are limited to the resources they can muster.  There are also Cooperative Societies that have been involved in Community activities for decades on the basis of "self-help" utilizing their own resources to change the lives of their members.  These have been recognized for the strength, Community Ownership and sustainability of their "self-help" projects.  They secure with a great deal of difficult, group guaranteed loans, for these Community Owned projects and maintenance of limited infrastructural projects and programmes.  

These groups are seen as vulnerable and ineffective in the eyes of their national governments even though they are registered by governments in their millions, but we see them as the antedote for eliminating the notion of "left behind".  

The United Nations and the Regional Economic Groupings have a duty to shine its light on these hard working Cooperative Societies whose services are selfless and get their member states to recognize them as partners.  I see partnerships between the CSO's and Governments as sine-qua-non to the successful implementation of the SDG's within National Development Plans so as to ensure the reality of  "No one is left behind".  It is time that Developing Countries and fragile states changed their approach to implementation of national plans and much more so, global agendas by giving a clear role to the Civil Society Organisations from conceptualization to implementation, monitoring and evaluation of development programmes.

Yes the SDG's17 Goals and 169 Targets may appear "ambitious" to the Developing economies of the World but they are a way of life for most living in the Developed economies of the World from where the perspective of "The World We Want" is derived.

All in all, what I'm trying to say here is that there's need for a shift in the development paradigm and this is achievable when all hands are on deck.  The platform has been created by the UN's SDG's and we are all party to it through our elected and trusted leaders of governments.

BNEIJARA (not verified)

Bonjour,

L’un des plus grands problèmes à résoudre pour la portée et l’implication concerne la coordination de l’aide. Des  du Plan d’actions nationaux pour l’efficacité de l’aide doivent être adoptés pour l’élaboration d’un dispositif intégré des financements extérieurs. Les difficultés persistent actuellement et constituent un véritable obstacle du fait de la faible intégration des flux d’aide dans le processus budgétaire, à cause de son fort taux d’imprévisibilité, ou de conditionnalités importantes au niveau de l’aide projet et la diversité des approches, parfois contradictoires, mises en œuvre au niveau des projets sur le terrain; − faible capacité de gestion de la dette ; − nombre pléthorique des unités de gestion des projets et programmes. Les défis majeurs visent l’amélioration de la prévisibilité et du contrôle de l’exécution du budget, une meilleure articulation entre les différents référentiels de développement et le renforcement des capacités de gestion de l’aide, la rationalisation de la gestion des projets et programmes. La non intégration et le manque de coordination auront des effets néfastes sur les ODD comme les OMD.

Tokunbo Lijadu-Oyemade (not verified)

There are certain facts we need to get right here; someone wants to know if the UN has implemented what it has on hand before they call for deliveration on other new initiatives; I suppose such as the SDG'S.  

The UN is not an implementing agency.  It generallly facilitates the deliberations leading to consensus building among its member nations regarding a policy direction that could at the end of the day be localized for purposes of implementation at the national level.  Consequently, if any country or group of countries fail to realize the objectives and goals in a convention or agenda in which they actively participated in building up to the stage of global adoption, the UN cannot be blamed as the responsibility has been passed on the each state actor to do as occassion serves them.  

Furthermore, no individual state or group of state or region can slow the rest of the world down in terms of development.  Consequently, rather than direct implementation question at the United Nations, Civil Societies Organizations have a responsibility to understand the issues to global agendas for development to which our respective Governments have undertaken with the rest of the world to adapt to national conditions in order to facilitate implementation and come up with a modus to ensure successful all-inclusive and sustainable  national implementation.  

Lal Manavado • Senior Advisor at undefined from Norway

Happy to see an ignored fact succintly put forward. Many thanks to you for  for setting forth what is absolutely necessary to understand clearly who is entitled to do what, and what exactly is that 'what'.  Without this simple but crucial clarification there will be much ado abouth nothing. By my halidom, it is refreshing to see your comment! Lal Manavado.  From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org]Sent: 17 March 2016 22:11To: Lal ManavadoSubject: [World We Want 2030] Tokunbo Lijadu-Oyemade Country President, Kins of Africa [KINSAF} NIGERIA from Nigeria commented on the Discussion "The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: scope and implications"

Rodrigo Barriga (not verified)

¿Cómo podemos contribuir desde cada una de nuestras perspectivas con los grandes objetivos de la Agenda 2030 para el desarrollo sostenible? Indudablemente desde el Instituto Panamericano de Geografía e Historia (IPGH) y GeoSUR, se pueden realizar muchos aportes, sin embargo lo más importante y de mayor transversalidad es seguir contribuyendo en facilitar la disponibilidad de información geoespacial de calidad en las Américas, lo que está muy relacionado con los procesos para acelerar el desarrollo de la respectiva infraestructura de datos espaciales, en la cual estamos comprometidos IPGH, SIRGAS, UN GGIM Américas y GeoSUR. Si analizamos cada uno de los 17 objetivos de la Agenda 2030 y las respectivas metas, podremos ver que la información geoespacial es un elemento clave en cada una de las fases del proceso para el logro de estos objetivos, tanto del punto de vista de su implementación como también en cuanto a los procedimientos para su seguimiento y examen. La información geoespacial de calidad no solo proporciona antecedentes del territorio, sino que también, al estar combinada con datos de tipo estadístico, es un elemento relevante en el uso de indicadores de desarrollo sostenible, éstos se pueden espacializar para determinar prioridades territoriales en apoyo al cumplimiento de estos objetivos y metas. Es posible por tanto analizar con ayuda de la información geoespacial el cumplimiento de los objetivos en una amplia dimensión ambiental que abarque los aspectos territoriales tanto físicos, como sociales y de percepción del espacio geográfico. El IPGH ha estado comprometido con estos temas desde muy antaño, impulsado anualmente sus programas de asistencia técnica y de publicaciones, este año no es la excepción es así como se privilegian iniciativas que propendan a la asociatividad, tanto entre distintos países como entre diferentes especialistas que incluyan diversas áreas del conocimiento, en temas de especial relevancia como la adaptación al cambio climático, ordenamiento territorial, gestión de riesgos naturales y temas patrimoniales. Con el programa GeoSUR estamos impulsando no tan solo la difusión de los datos a través del respectivo Geoportal, sino que también contribuyendo a la creación de capacidades en diversas formas, pero muy especialmente a través de los talleres de cartografía participativa para la obtención del Mapa Integrado Panamericano , en donde hemos unido esfuerzos con CAF banco de Desarrollo de América Latina, Centro Nacional de información Geográfica de España (CNIG), Servicio Geológico de Estados Unidos (USGS) y los Institutos Geográficos de los países participantes. Otro elemento clave será el avance que logremos en el corto plazo para mejorar la gestión de los respectivos metadatos, lo que nos dará mayor certeza en cuanto al descubrimiento, calidad y linaje de los datos geográficos. Esperamos seguir contribuyendo y sumándonos decididamente a las distintas iniciativas, entendiendo que podemos contribuir a mejorar y transformar nuestro mundo, en beneficio de la preservación de la especie humana y de nuestro planeta, como también heredar un mundo mejor para nuestros descendientes.

BNEIJARA (not verified)

Bonjour,

« Principe ne laisser personne derrière ». Les 17 objectifs de développement durable que le monde annonce en début de l’année 2016 montrent combien ce nouveau Programme universel est ambitieux. Il s’inscrit dans le prolongement des objectifs du Millénaire pour le développement et vise à réaliser ce que ceux-ci n’ont pas permis de faire. Il vise aussi à réaliser les droits de l’homme pour tous, l’égalité des sexes et l’autonomisation des femmes et des filles. Intégrés et indissociables, ils concilient les trois dimensions du développement durable : économique, sociale et environnementale.

Cela ne peu se faire sans une croissance économique soutenue, inclusive et durable. Les risques de catastrophes, les changements climatiques, défavorisent le développement de plusieurs pays et demandent que soient élaborées des stratégies globales intégrées et mieux coordonnées. Ce grand projet ou Programme de développement durable dépendra de son décollage, démarrage et départ .Il doit être un programme réellement transformateur, qui s’attaque aux causes sous-jacentes des inégalités et aux sources de tensions et de conflits potentiels.

 Ces  objectifs doivent être  associés à des financements pour les soutenir, des politiques pour y parvenir, des moyens humains pour les mettre en œuvre et des indicateurs pour en évaluer les résultats. Une démarche participative multi-acteurs impliquant le gouvernement, collectivités locales, organisations de la société civile (OSC), partenaires techniques et financiers, secteur privé, travaillant tous pour une meilleure appropriation seule gage de réussite de cet engagement.

Antonio Roque (not verified)

In the future world, we all care about each other, nations and people in a dynamic wheel of intelligently and strategically sharing each others burdens, the brotherhood of humanity in a gigantic wheel of affection and balance, no one shall be left behind due to the gravity of love and shared resources that are get technologically being acquired preserving the planet. Maybe reaching the point where everyone in the planet is entitled to a very small and basic monthly salary to guarantee minimum survival, continuity, spiritual and human evolution and economical activation, unlocking an intelligent growth engine, by sovereignty enforcement or donated funds. Poverty is everywhere in this planet in rich or poor countries.

Legal and technological systems can be used to channel diplomatic, security, political, institutional and business resolutions via the UN SDG and to achieve this we would need:

1. The self-government – freedom, spirituality, self-control, sense of duty, wisdom, openness and moral from citizens.

2. The local government-supportive to NGOs

3. The regional government-countries

4. The United Nations Parliamentary system of the people for earth, space and universal affairs, en.unpacampaign.org

5. The supporting NGOs from all over the world

6. The United nations organizations

7. The United Nations – for the nations

8. Supporting groups of countries by their status:

– G20

– Fragile state groups

– BRICS

– Commercial state groups

–         And others…

 

The UN with the SDG is able to ensure balanced policy coherence by diversity and understanding strategic country needs as a pickup for future progress and frame, each country and UN organisation with a specific studied case of integration of the SDG.

The United nations and each of the UN organisations would present and negotiate a designed program with each government under the SDG. What are the most important SDG to that country? How can we integrate the SDG in a win-win situation; key pickup points are important to value and integrate the SDG program.

The UN could also operate a quantum computer ex:www.dwavesys.com to analyse and monitor trade, data from several sources for example analysing the traffic of commodities like in a traffic light system, monitoring the progress of the SDG worldwide by all the sources etc… having more efficient view and transparency of what is happening.

 

Country integration should be done by jointly UN, UN organisations and governments work together side by side to understand the main key points of action and the main key SDG more important to that country; the country would nominate some body or person to lead the negotiations and create this joint project and study. Starting by a proposal from the UN. Probably the UN could have a representative in the parliament of that country.

Exchanging and communicating via a cloud platform with video, chat, messaging, documents exchange etc..

The program for the types of country would have to be deeply analyzed having all factors in case, economical development, levels of poverty, technological awareness, cultural and spiritual orientation, environmental and industrial progress etc…studies have to be made and global opinions have to be collected and final decisions with countries for joint project development to target local areas have to be made.

 

At local level the UN would have to have in reference the government to work with the local private and public organisations of the country, the NGOs and ECOSOC NGOS would be able to help and integrate as well and and this local organisations are the ones that should report progress directly to the UN with the government awareness.

All this can be done with joint government development and diplomacy, creating and integrating the needs of the country with SDG, getting reports and monitoring with local private-public organizations, creating awareness campaigns to the people and using technologically quantum computing power, cloud solutions and platforms 

www.wapo-int.org

wapohq@gmail.com

Jordi Baltà (not verified)

A fundamental step for ensuring that the implementation of the 2030 Agenda ‘leaves no one behind’ lies in the active involvement of local communities both in consultations leading to the design of relevant sustainable development strategies and programmes and in subsequent implementation activities. The ‘localisation’ of the SDGs, including the active involvement of local governments and civil society organisations, should be an essential step for the ownership of the 2030 Agenda, its implementation and its results.

 

The integration of a cultural dimension in these processes, in line with the 2030 Agenda’s assertion that ‘all cultures and civilizations can contribute to, and are crucial enablers of, sustainable development’, should be a key condition in the design and implementation of strategies. In order to leave no-one behind, knowledge existing in civil society organisations and cultural communities, including minorities and vulnerable groups, should be integrated in the process, and particular attention should be paid to cultural diversity throughout the process. Creative ways of engaging with diverse communities should be sought – an involvement of artists and cultural organisations in this process could provide useful ideas in this respect.

Ruzanna Tarverdyan • Founding President at The Geneva Consensus Foundation

We submit that the solutions for Sustainable development in the interconnected Global world- two multiple dimensional phenomenon, entail a significant paradigm shift towards systems analysis and matrix thinking to address inter-temporal effectiveness-efficiency-equity challenges for future generations.

Paye Banza (not verified)

Knowledge sharing is a universal challenge and it requires global solution approach; it does not a matter either the solution should be for ending poverty, reducing inequalities or protecting the planet. Everybody could agree that INOVATIVE EDUCATION is a determinant factor to empower human beings, raise human dignity and transform human character with pathological values such as greed, hate, killings and human right abuse to harmonious values such as peace, love, compassion, harmony, and innovative spirits. This will provide positive change to happen in communities and end poverty, hunger and human suffering due to wars. Innovative education will provide empowerment to the people on earth and also develop an effective policy to move forward human civilization, development, and industrialization. There has to be an identifiable same Quality Education Resources Delivery for All.    The above concept poses a major challenge and requires the most comprehensive inclusive solution approach. 

 

SDGs concerns need to be urgently addressed. However, the way they relate one event to another might change course of action that occurs. For instance, EDUCATION is a prerequisite to any successful solution for all SDGs targets. Therefore, providing a quality education for all becomes critical to moving forward with any other approach. Question:  How to ensure all children around the world access the same quality resources for education in order to provide equality for the growth of all children to have equal knowledge for development and industrialization of all countries in the world? There should not be any developing world and developed world. Civilization has no distinctions and divisions but rather embraces the beauty of inclusiveness, equality and justice. This has to be the basis of SDG's concerns and develop in a synchronized solution that will resonate among all member of state. This will insure reciprocity among all people in the world. Our suggestion is humble and sample to apply by mutual eLibrary (AIDDE) resources sharing platform technology and vision solution that will meet all the Educational agenda SDGs2030 expectations for quality and equality of education delivery for all. This platform is well developed that there is no need to delay its solution application! Let do it now, the intelligence and expertise are ready. This should not be only one way solution because at every development level, inclusion rules should prevail. Quality education for all should be the base commitment and active contribution creating effective solutions for a better framework for the each local community to get involve in local development. All the above solutions we have suggested together with the local people perspectives and realities should bring about the change that is needed to reflect in SDG sustainability solutions and also contain the solutions for the agenda for climate change. 

 

Shifting from traditional Education Resources to digital provides a lot of room to try an alternative solutions including #OneWorldOneAcademicLibrary . Ease on making resources widely equally available for all and significantly reduces papers dependency.  "The production of papers process consists of two main steps: pulping and bleaching. Pulping is the initial stage and the source of the most pollutant of this industry." The future of Education and Research is not in Static Library where students are in continuous fight for resources and impossible to have all updated resources in one place no matter the size of its physical infrastructure. "Collectively —policymakers, development partners, private sector visionaries, and citizens—must push for change and redouble our efforts to meet the expectations of today’s youth, so that they can take advantage of the opportunities that will come their way as economies grow. They cannot do so without access to high quality education, finance and technology". 

 

With Internet almost everywhere which implies Education anywhere and, given advantage of digital revolution era, makes it possible to deliver same quality education resources everywhere or at least on tablets using digital mobile library solution part of it where Internet connectivity is still a problem. This is why such a worldwide knowledge pool well designed with sharing rules would break through solutions providing same quality education material for all should boost research, free invention spirit and avoid repeats, PLAGIARISM and re-invention of the wheel. With above details in mind to secure quality education to everyone, improves lives of young women and men through better education and research through technology. Participant will acquire the necessary skills, knowledge, and wisdom to contribute in the capacity building of their various communities, villages, and nations and will be now equip to make informed decisions that are based upon democratic principles and also eradicates corruptions and, poverty in the long last achieving a truly and resulting EMPOWERMENT.

 

We have been ready, on duty for humanity whenever informative session might need to mark and place in context "One World One Academic Library" concept-vision for all. Courtesy of FvTech:  http://www.fvtelibrary.com/aboutus

Twitter: @FinalVision1

 

Stephanie (not verified)

I believe that sustainable community education needs to be taught in schools and inside communities themselves as part of social services. The SDG 11 enables us to create a cohesive curriculum that connects the community - the basic human neighborhood - to the global community. This enables every community resident to be a change agent in the world. Every community to believe in the dignity of their life and for the rest of us to appreciated the dignity in everyone else's.
Stephanie Tansey
CEIN

Stephanie (not verified)

I believe that sustainable community education needs to be taught in schools and inside communities themselves as part of social services. The SDG 11 enables us to create a cohesive curriculum that connects the community - the basic human neighborhood - to the global community. This enables every community resident to be a change agent in the world. Every community to believe in the dignity of their life and for the rest of us to appreciated the dignity in everyone else's.
Stephanie Tansey
CEIN

Stephanie (not verified)

I believe that sustainable community education needs to be taught in schools and inside communities themselves as part of social services. The SDG 11 enables us to create a cohesive curriculum that connects the community - the basic human neighborhood - to the global community. This enables every community resident to be a change agent in the world. Every community to believe in the dignity of their life and for the rest of us to appreciated the dignity in everyone else's.
Stephanie Tansey
CEIN

Stephanie (not verified)

I believe that sustainable community education needs to be taught in schools and inside communities themselves as part of social services. The SDG 11 enables us to create a cohesive curriculum that connects the community - the basic human neighborhood - to the global community. This enables every community resident to be a change agent in the world. Every community to believe in the dignity of their life and for the rest of us to appreciated the dignity in everyone else's.
Stephanie Tansey
CEIN

Stephanie (not verified)

I believe that sustainable community education needs to be taught in schools and inside communities themselves as part of social services. The SDG 11 enables us to create a cohesive curriculum that connects the community - the basic human neighborhood - to the global community. This enables every community resident to be a change agent in the world. Every community to believe in the dignity of their life and for the rest of us to appreciated the dignity in everyone else's.
Stephanie Tansey
CEIN

Paye Banza (not verified)

Well thought but still missing its traditional community SHARING value which makes everyone rely on each other's effort to commute further. Imagine a village where you share all on daily basis. No matter you have or not, everyone contribute with what they have! AIDDE makes it possible on different ground, EDUCATION, fitting in the missing puzzle. When education is concerned, SHARING RESOURCES becomes a cure to any struggle and inconstancy communities around the world have been suffering from. http://www.fvtelibrary.com/faq

-- Paye Banza, International Sales ManagerFVT (Future Vision Technology) - AIDDE Email: nurasoltech@gmail.com / sales@fvtelibrary.com Skype: NurasolTech Facebook: Paye Banza / Twitter: @FinalVision1 http://futuregentech.com / http://www.fvtelibrary.com

 

Stephanie (not verified)

I believe that sustainable community education needs to be taught in schools and inside communities themselves as part of social services. The SDG 11 enables us to create a cohesive curriculum that connects the community - the basic human neighborhood - to the global community. This enables every community resident to be a change agent in the world. Every community to believe in the dignity of their life and for the rest of us to appreciated the dignity in everyone else's.
Stephanie Tansey
CEIN

Stephanie (not verified)

I believe that sustainable community education needs to be taught in schools and inside communities themselves as part of social services. The SDG 11 enables us to create a cohesive curriculum that connects the community - the basic human neighborhood - to the global community. This enables every community resident to be a change agent in the world. Every community to believe in the dignity of their life and for the rest of us to appreciated the dignity in everyone else's.
Stephanie Tansey
CEIN

Patricia M. O'Donnell (not verified)

The globally approved UNESCO Sustainable Development Goals- Goal 11, focused on inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable cities provides a core target for inclusive public spaces and many other aspects of human settlements. The shared legacy of urban heritage is expressed in public spaces: historic parks; waterfronts; green corridors; and traditional urban street patterns. This heritage together with recent public spaces and green design detailing in public spaces these cultural assets of public grounds offer a series of accessible spaces for the use and enjoyment of a diverse urban populace. To serve everyone, the diversity of urban culture must be welcomed. As public spaces are adaptable to varied uses for recreation that is social, healthful, and educational, traditional values can be accommodated in public spaces. Urban public spaces contribute to sustainability through all three pillars, economy, environment and society.

An important aspect of "Leaving no one behind" can be achieved by providing healthful, resilient public spaces in human settlements of all sizes. Inclusive public spaces are spatially accessible to all, with transparent decision making processes of changes offering community inputs and consensus building, and the benefits of public spaces are free open and democratic.

 

Another important point is that many cities 1/2 the space is not buildings, for example Washington DC 56% and Vienna Austria, 52%. In areas of poverty there are uniformly fewer green spaces and poorer quality transportation infrastructure, including parks, trees, parkways, streets, sidewalks, trails, canals,  and storm water management features. Informal settlements, noted by the World Bank as containing more than 1 billion people and continuing to grow, have no formal public spaces to provide shared healthful areas. 

 

My experience in the realm of urban public space indicates that good governance and effective partnerships are required to upgrade the urban heritage of public spaces and add new green, social and resilient spaces to cities.  Uplifting everyone in human settlements means improving public spaces of all types across all economic and demographic levels.

Patricia M. O'Donnell (not verified)

The globally approved UNESCO Sustainable Development Goals- Goal 11, focused on inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable cities provides a core target for inclusive public spaces and many other aspects of human settlements. The shared legacy of urban heritage is expressed in public spaces: historic parks; waterfronts; green corridors; and traditional urban street patterns. This heritage together with recent public spaces and green design detailing in public spaces these cultural assets of public grounds offer a series of accessible spaces for the use and enjoyment of a diverse urban populace. To serve everyone, the diversity of urban culture must be welcomed. As public spaces are adaptable to varied uses for recreation that is social, healthful, and educational, traditional values can be accommodated in public spaces. Urban public spaces contribute to sustainability through all three pillars, economy, environment and society.

An important aspect of "Leaving no one behind" can be achieved by providing healthful, resilient public spaces in human settlements of all sizes. Inclusive public spaces are spatially accessible to all, with transparent decision making processes of changes offering community inputs and consensus building, and the benefits of public spaces are free open and democratic.

 

Another important point is that many cities 1/2 the space is not buildings, for example Washington DC 56% and Vienna Austria, 52%. In areas of poverty there are uniformly fewer green spaces and poorer quality transportation infrastructure, including parks, trees, parkways, streets, sidewalks, trails, canals,  and storm water management features. Informal settlements, noted by the World Bank as containing more than 1 billion people and continuing to grow, have no formal public spaces to provide shared healthful areas. 

 

My experience in the realm of urban public space indicates that good governance and effective partnerships are required to upgrade the urban heritage of public spaces and add new green, social and resilient spaces to cities.  Uplifting everyone in human settlements means improving public spaces of all types across all economic and demographic levels.

Patricia M. O'Donnell (not verified)

The globally approved UNESCO Sustainable Development Goals- Goal 11, focused on inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable cities provides a core target for inclusive public spaces and many other aspects of human settlements. The shared legacy of urban heritage is expressed in public spaces: historic parks; waterfronts; green corridors; and traditional urban street patterns. This heritage together with recent public spaces and green design detailing in public spaces these cultural assets of public grounds offer a series of accessible spaces for the use and enjoyment of a diverse urban populace. To serve everyone, the diversity of urban culture must be welcomed. As public spaces are adaptable to varied uses for recreation that is social, healthful, and educational, traditional values can be accommodated in public spaces. Urban public spaces contribute to sustainability through all three pillars, economy, environment and society.

An important aspect of "Leaving no one behind" can be achieved by providing healthful, resilient public spaces in human settlements of all sizes. Inclusive public spaces are spatially accessible to all, with transparent decision making processes of changes offering community inputs and consensus building, and the benefits of public spaces are free open and democratic.

 

Another important point is that many cities 1/2 the space is not buildings, for example Washington DC 56% and Vienna Austria, 52%. In areas of poverty there are uniformly fewer green spaces and poorer quality transportation infrastructure, including parks, trees, parkways, streets, sidewalks, trails, canals,  and storm water management features. Informal settlements, noted by the World Bank as containing more than 1 billion people and continuing to grow, have no formal public spaces to provide shared healthful areas. 

 

My experience in the realm of urban public space indicates that good governance and effective partnerships are required to upgrade the urban heritage of public spaces and add new green, social and resilient spaces to cities.  Uplifting everyone in human settlements means improving public spaces of all types across all economic and demographic levels.

Patricia M. O'Donnell (not verified)

The globally approved UNESCO Sustainable Development Goals- Goal 11, focused on inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable cities provides a core target for inclusive public spaces and many other aspects of human settlements. The shared legacy of urban heritage is expressed in public spaces: historic parks; waterfronts; green corridors; and traditional urban street patterns. This heritage together with recent public spaces and green design detailing in public spaces these cultural assets of public grounds offer a series of accessible spaces for the use and enjoyment of a diverse urban populace. To serve everyone, the diversity of urban culture must be welcomed. As public spaces are adaptable to varied uses for recreation that is social, healthful, and educational, traditional values can be accommodated in public spaces. Urban public spaces contribute to sustainability through all three pillars, economy, environment and society.
An important aspect of "Leaving no one behind" can be achieved by providing healthful, resilient public spaces in human settlements of all sizes. Inclusive public spaces are spatially accessible to all, with transparent decision making processes of changes offering community inputs and consensus building, and the benefits of public spaces are free open and democratic.

Another important point is that many cities 1/2 the space is not buildings, for example Washington DC 56% and Vienna Austria, 52%. In areas of poverty there are uniformly fewer green spaces and poorer quality transportation infrastructure, including parks, trees, parkways, streets, sidewalks, trails, canals, and storm water management features. Informal settlements, noted by the World Bank as containing more than 1 billion people and continuing to grow, have no formal public spaces to provide shared healthful areas.

My experience in this field indicates that good governance and effective partnerships are required to upgrade the urban heritage of public spaces and add new green, social and resilient spaces to cities. Uplifting everyone in human settlements means improving public spaces of all types across all economic levels.

mario alberto rivera contreras (not verified)

A nivel internacional, ¿cuáles son los retos a garantizar la coherencia de las políticas para el desarrollo sostenible? ¿Cuáles son algunos ejemplos de las mejores prácticas y / o quiénes son los "líderes" de rastro la manera de mejorar la coherencia?

Uno de los grandes retos que tenemos frente a un mundo desigual está relacionado con los grupos y personas vulnerables tienen derecho a medidas especiales de protección e integración, distribución de los recursos, acceso a los servicios básicos y no discriminación. Se incluyen aquí aquellas personas o grupos en situación de pobreza, de riesgo ambiental, víctimas de la violencia, con discapacidades, migrantes forzados, refugiados, etc. y cualquier grupo en situación de desventaja respecto el resto. Mientras esta desventjas no puedan ser disminuídas, con políticas que se diseñen desde la perspectiva de derechos humanos será difícil pensar en inclusión. Necesitamos ser inclusivos en la elaboración de políticas y su implementación. Un aspecto sin duda que debemos considerar es una economía solidaria en las ciudades. Para ello, las ciudades tendrán que conseguir implicar al sector privado en programas sociales e iniciativas destinadas a los sectores vulnerables. Los medios de vida sostenibles que están auentes en la población excluida, requiere de una mirada de intrgralidad y de derechos humanos. desarrollar solidaridad e igualdad, así como promover sistemas fiscales progresivosque aseguren la redistribución y reduzcan la desigualdad.

Asela • from Sri Lanka

Interesting to see the e-discussion. Global Parliamentarians Forum for Evaluation (GPFE) https://globalparliamentarianforum.wordpress.com/ promotes National Evaluation Policies and systems at country level. GPFE works with parliamentarians, government representatives and VOPEs (Voluntary Organizations for Professional Evaluations) to promote enabling environment for evaluation including SDGs. We have conducted a global study on national evaluation policies and found out that only about 20 countries have formal NEPs. http://www.pfde.net/index.php/publications-resources/global-mapping-rep… Also we have documented case studies of NEPs from selected countries. http://www.pfde.net/index.php/publications-resources/2014-02-28-19-08-54 Also I would like to share the resource on "National evaluation policies for sustainable and equitable development" http://www.mymande.org/sites/default/files/files/NationalEvaluationPoli… In this year we have launched a webinar series called "Meet a parliamentarian" and also a video campaign with parliamentarians to promote evaluation of sustainable development https://parliamentariansforevaluationcampaign.wordpress.com/ Happy to share more on this platform. 

Lal Manavado • Senior Advisor at undefined from Norway

Real evaluation. Who are competent to ascertain the success or failure of any 'development effort?' The obvious, reasonable answer is, those whose lives are directly affected by it. In other words,  the people of the area involved. Current 'evaluation mechanisms' resort to indirect methods, the basic assumption being, human responses can be accurately measured by indirect means as we do in sciences concerned with gnomic phenomena. It is a great pity that the unsoundness of the method has not been appreciated by its users. If one wants to know about a project, go and ask the local people, preferably in their own language. LM: From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org]Sent: 24 March 2016 06:51To: Lal ManavadoSubject: [World We Want 2030] Asela evaluator from Sri Lanka commented on the Discussion "The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: scope and implications"

Asheesh Kumar Pandey • Teaching cum Research Fellow at Institute of Engineering and Technology Lucknow India from India

Wish you all very happy Holi (Indian Festival). Terror is most seriois problem of world and mainly educated youth and young people diverted in this area. In a survey, people who are not engaged with family and social responcibility and unsatisfied with present living environment, likely to turn in wrong path. So it is most important to engage all thease type people in sustainable development to reduce terrorist problem.

john r bell (not verified)

Greetings, being new to the discussion I am curious as to where the issue of people living with disablities comes into play in the goal of sustainable developememt within this discussion.  My focus is based in Guatemala, where I have lived and worked for the last 23 years, developing sustainable programs for people living with disabilities.  In Guatemala, is is calculated that 14% of our over 14 million person population is living with a disability.

Zeru Desta • Child Protection Country Program Lead at Plan International Ethiopia from Ethiopia

I have a reservation to talk about  the 2030 agenda for sustainable development while the world is shaking by chaos of war, corruption, dictatorship and many more. If we come to Africa, except few like senegal, ghana, south africa, Tanzania, to some extent Kenya the rest African leaders are staying in power till they go to grave and with out the will of the people, and sustainable development is the result of democratization,peace, good governance and so on, in addition to these wars induced by foreign super powers are going on in Middle east and else where , hence, for me it is premature to talk about the so called sustainable Dev't in an empty ground. Before that all stakeholders should do something for peace and democratization which are the ground for Sustainable Dev't

Lal Manavado • Senior Advisor at undefined from Norway

On African leaders remaining in power unto their grave One  may charitably describe their endeavour as sustained personal development. LM. From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org]Sent: 24 March 2016 06:51To: Lal ManavadoSubject: [World We Want 2030] Zeru Fantaw Child Protection Specialist from Ethiopia commented on the Discussion "The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: scope and implications"

Ashwini Sathnur • Capacity Development Expert at United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) from India

How can the guiding principle of 'Leave no one behind' be put into practice in implementing the 2030 Agenda in different development contexts (e.g. least developed countries, middle-income countries, high-income countries, fragile states etc.)?

Inclusive Development has a guiding principle and goal to achieve Inclusiveness i.e capturing the inputs of all persons leaving no one behind. Socio - economic progress achieves the norms of gaining employment and inclusive work culture of all persons including the specially abled persons. All the sectors could engage in creating innovations for Inclusive agenda in their domains. For eg.  Inclusive finance would generate financial inclusion of all the unbanked populations by utilizing ICT devices and Digital Financial Services.

 

 

At the international level, what are challenges to ensuring policy coherence for sustainable development? What are some examples of best practice and/or who are the "trail blazers" leading the way to improved coherence?

At the international level, interoperability could be mentioned as one such challenge in Financial Inclusion. Creating enhanced knowledge and awareness of the ICT technology and related fields would enable bridging the skills gap between the educated and uneducated. Creating rural camps and workshops and increasing the literacy levels could enable the progress of the "Leave no one behind" policy.

 

How could the UN development system provide coordinated and integrated support for the achievement of the 2030 Agenda?

The UN Development system could build more ICT enabled tools for enabling the purpose of achieving the 2030 Agenda. At the same time, projecting the built tools to the sectors which require them. This is basically for the purpose of supporting the achievement of the 2030 Agenda. Also enabling the integration of the sectors involved in the deployment of the tool. For eg. Inclusive finance would involve Financial, Telecommunications, Digital Communications, Education, Information Technology and Security sectors. Thus introducing the Digital Financial Services mechanism would require coordination and collaboration of the sectors mentioned above .

 

 

Lanre Rotimi (not verified)

Dear e-Discussion Facilitator,

Further to points made in yesterday's Post,  as the Facilitators on the Three Themes are expected to send UNDP and UNDESA Report on e-Discussion 2016 Outcome to ECOSOC that are expected to focus on action-oriented recommendations for steps and measures to close remaining gaps, meet challenges and accelerate implementation, to be taken by Governments, relevant intergovernmental bodies, mechanisms and entities of the United Nations system and other stakeholders" please find attached Focused Points Paper 5.

We urge Stakeholders to please recognize that the detailed information that we have set out in UNDP and UNDESA e-Discussion 2016 Focused Points Paper Series, Papers 1 - 5 need to be taken together for Best Results.Best wishes,Lanre RotimiDirector GeneralInternational Society for Poverty Elimination /Economic Alliance Group andDirector NEHAP (New End Hunger and Poverty)

Joseph Mugo Ikinya (not verified)

Achieving the sustainable development goals by 2030 will be a great achievement towards promoting equity and welfare of the human kind. Sustainable development goals aim at meeting the various humanitarian needs by use of the available resources or natural utilities

I wish to focus on what I can refer to as the chief sustainable goal which is QUALITY EDUCATION  or better stated as education for all. For many years  education has been considered good for income generation and hence the best weapon to fight poverty .For the purpose of this discussion I prefer not restrict myself to income generation through education based career as the only benefit of education. Education has other life improving benefits such as improving once self-esteem, expanding ones cognitive abilities and helping one understand the dynamics of the environment around you. Such skills enables people direct their thinking and everyday activities towards solution guided economic and social activities that assist in poverty reduction.

Education is one of the surest ways out of poverty. Reduced poverty means that most families can afford medicine and a balanced which directly relates to healthy population that is more resistant to diseases as a result of increased body immunity. Quality education equips learners with knowledge and skills which are vital to one them employment in formal sectors, this brings about increased production and hence economic growth. Employment is always accompanied by earnings that help in reduction of poverty level. Apart from employment, education also brings about spillover effect to the whole society this enlightenment   brings about social and cultural paradigm shift that is responsible for gender balance, responsible and sustainable of natural resources such as soil, water forests and energy. Conservation of natural resources can be achieved by education based innovation such as use of clean energy, green building and so on.

What about peace and justice? One of the major fueling civil and ethnic wars in Africa is competition for natural resources. Though many may argue that political and social manipulation alongside ethnic and religion diversity is what is behind these  crisis, but we need to ask ourselves what motivates this endless rivalry and hunger for power? One doesn’t need to struggle looking for an answer, its defiantly competition for natural resources. Its simple  civil and ethnic wars occur if conditions  exist to make them financially Politicians and other charismatic leaders take advantage of the poor and ignorant majority ( poverty and ignorance is has direct correlation with poor quality education ).These two factors create incentives to individuals to choose conflict (Hoeffler 2011) Quality education  can solve these problems by :enlightening the communities makes them less vulnerable to  being exploited by  their leaders to engage in violence, providing the communities with the power to demand accountability and  quitable use of the countries natural resources and providing alternatives for sources of utility currently provided by few limited resources  through research and innovations

In conclusion, most of the SDGs revolve around quality education. By investing in quality education to improve human capital most countries can achieve poverty reduction alongside most of the SDGs.

 

Lisa Clapier • CEO & Founder at UnifyEvolution.info

Thank you for your valuable contribution: education in harmony with a thriving future. Please see my post and do let me know if there is any interest in our earth ethic education for universities. If we can be of support! Thank you for all you are doing!

Adriana Galvani • Assisant Professor at University of Bologna IT

Adriana Galvani • Assisant Professor at University of Bologna IT

Adriana Galvani

We know that one of the major subject of the Agenda 2030 is resilience, but the discussion argument I propose is the question of Harmony.

It is natural that men must live in harmony with nature and harmony with others. As far as men pull away from the natural world, the life becomes more difficult. Animals, trees, plants, flowers, all they, strictly depend on the soil. At the opposite, men are going even more far away from the substance of Earth, living in artificial conditions.

Natural conditions suppose a dissemination of people according to natural resources and spaces. That means a horizontal distribution on Earth. The enormously demographic increase, superior to the increase of every species, must then be settled in vertical arrangement, like in even greater and higher skyscrapers, or like chickens in high cages.

Now, this so named vertical set, creates psychological tensions, economic expenses and waste, even anxiety and tensions.

Looking beyond us, in the past, we can see the best historical periods were following the law of nature. The law of nature is a competition among living creatures in similar endowment conditions.

Progress has made human conditions more competitive and, at the same time, more fragile, subject to the load of technology, money, education, skills, competencies.

We think the only tool for social equity is, and should be, EDUCATION. Since education is too different among countries, it will be impossible to gain the same lifestyle conditions for everyone.

Education depends on governments; most of them do not fit out the right conditions, so individuals of poor countries are obliged to stay apart, even if they migrate towards evolved countries.

A supra-governmental organization is necessary to equalize the same opportunities for all, since education is seen as an expenditure, not a gain - which is in the future - by governments which do not care for such outflows.

Lack of education becomes a major impairment during migrations, since life is more difficult in unstable situations, and among stronger competitors.

In conclusion, to rich equality, men must be equal. Thy are born equal, but they became more and more unequal, for lack of tangible and intangible means, occasions and opportunities.

Dole, in itself, cannot solve substantial problems.

As substantial solutions it seems valuable, nowadays, the one child policy. This solution, so much criticized against China, is the only one which can equalize people, especially because poorest families have usually more children. The money and time disposability of parents must be split in several parts with more sons, in fact this was one of the reasons of the very poor conditions that brought to communism in China. There, even a small portion of kitchen garden had to be divided among heirs in the past.

Personally, I have always been against mononuclear families, but, today, I see the situation more intricate because open families, and I have seen so much misunderstanding and contrasts among brothers.

With this opinion, I am able to see a signal in the UN logos, or the logo where a small family is designed: two parents and one child. There is also a picture with two grandparents, two parents and one child.

Certainly, the one child policy has to be corrected, or should be proposed to societies which don’t see any differences among boys and girls.

I would specify that is probably only my opinion, or my vision, but I agree.

Our duty as humans, is to produce human being superior to us, who are already living.

Inevitably, that brings, once more, to the differences among different stages of cultural evolution.

Lisa Clapier • CEO & Founder at UnifyEvolution.info

Adriana, you bring up many good points, thank you. Living in harmony with nature, while not violating 'do no harm' is the ultimate culture of peace society, however the core family looks like, as we know it will have a vast spectrum in any society. Tolerance for differences, not judging our brothers and or sisters in community, but providing assistance, help, resources, etc from a space of inclusivity, and worth for everyone. Stewards of Life! Thank you for being one, bless you, -Lisa

Lal Manavado • Senior Advisor at undefined from Norway

I agree with you on most points. May I point out that education it has been used in this forum is a contributor to the problem than one that alleviates it. However, if it is used in its appropriate civilised sense, i.e.,  directed towards enabling a person to adequately satisfy one's six fundamental needs in a way that does not harm others and our common environment, then it is a valuable asset. But, today, education serves as a production-line facility that turns out human raw materials into what economy requires. A bit shuddering reality. Moreover, the modern economy sets no legal limits to profit or to any acquisition of gain. Its backbone is competition as in any alley in a dangerous slum. Therefore, it would be the greatest obstacle to harmony man has ever invented.  Lal Manavado. From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org]Sent: 25 March 2016 00:51To: Lal ManavadoSubject: [World We Want 2030] Adriana Galvani researcher from Italy commented on the Discussion "The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: scope and implications"

Arunaselam Rasappan (not verified)

My apologies for joining this discussion late but I must have missed the earlier notification about this forum.

I have several comments on the SDGs and the three questions but due to time constraints, am going to give my commnents generally and still try to address the three questions:

 

I think the slogan "Leave no one behind" is quite apt in terms of the desire and is a much needed strategic target for all our countries and especially the less developed countries.  In this context however, the question that is upmost in my mind is how are we going to achieve this global nice sounding goal?  We have been struggling with the MDGs for years and with some success though the success and effort level dont necessarily match. Given the 17 targets under the SDGs compared to the much small MDG targets, this is indeed a mammoth challenge...so the question to me is simple....what are we going to do differently under the SDGs to achieve the larger number of targets?  Do we have a complete list of what has gone wrong and what needs to be plugged under the SDGs to ensure the success of the SDGs? How can we effectively address/support/make a difference with the challenges being faced in the SDG implementing countries? Are we going to go through another long cylce of the "business as usual" approach utilized under the MDGs?

My humble opinion on this is that we should take a careful look at the way implementing countries are adopting and working on the SDGs.  I have worked in 30+ countries in the last 20 years and before that another 25 years in a developing country.  I dont see any development partner looking at the challenges within the country in a holistic manner.  Our approaches to address the challenges are compartmentalized and in many cases non-sustainable. The implementing countries adopt myriad systems and aproaches in implementing the MDG (and now the SDG) programs and projects but there is limited success. Teh situation is almost "chaotic" in some countries with the governments trying to strategically "maximise" the development aid that comes in.  In short, there is no integrated approach to the development intiiatives in the countries. 

Case in point is very obvious.  In many developing countries, there is no integration between the devleopment plannnig process and the budgetary process.  These countries are still practising traditional line-item incremental budgeting. The development budget and the operating budget dont necessarily talk to each other or are integrated.  Performance is typically directed at the projects under the development budget.  Parliamentary debates are more often than not focused on the projects under the development budget (which by the way only typically accounts for about 30% of the national budget).

There is minimal  integration, if at all, between the development initiatives, policies and human capital that drives policies. There is no proper M&E system or approaches that are linked systematically and in an MfDR compliant manner with the development initiative. I could go on and these are not textbook narrations but all drawn from real-life experiences over the years and sadly, even NOW.  The Paris Declaration on donor harmomization is non existent, especially within the implementing countries...look around us in these countries and you can see plenty of evidence to the effect.

 

Withou having to bore everyone with more such "horror" stories, let me come to a simple comment:  What are we going to do differently under the SDGs that will address the fundamental stumbling blocks under the MDGs and now?  I dont see new strategies to address these fundamental challenges being addressed (though perhaps they are there and of course I may not be fully aware of all the positive efforts that are gonig on out there).

My suggestion to the UNDP (and other developent partners) is to review the Paris Declaration and the Accra and Busan Declarations...the points made there are good and hit the nail but we have failed to see them through and are not practicing it.  The UNDP needs to help all SDG implementing countries adopt and utilize an integrated approach to development management (covering all components of the development cycle).  By working with the governments and "encouraging" them to adopt an integrated approach, the countries themselves would be able to get a better handle and better manage their development initiatives and to produce better development results.  Many countries need this assistance and support to guide them but yet be able to maintain their country-driven priorities and policies.

From our experience, we believe that an important UN development agency like the UNDP must lead the way to push for nd support this form of integrated approach.  The process is not that complicated nor expensive but yet will go a long way to engaging SDG implementing governments and guiding them on how to ensure the SDG targets are systematically planned for and achieved within the SDG period.

 

Am happy to discuss this further and/or to give further examples and cases to support what I'm suggesting.

 

ONce again, my apologies for the late entry and for my long winded comments.

 

Best regards

Aru Rasappan

President, Asia-Pacific Evaluation Association (APEA)

Senior Advisor, Center for Development & Research in Evaluation, International (Malaysia)

 

Lisa Clapier • CEO & Founder at UnifyEvolution.info

Arunaselam,Thank you for your heart felt response. I believe you identified it poignantly: holistic approach!  Please see my post, we would be happy to discuss how we may be able to assist you to realizing your vision! -Lisa

Arunaselam Rasappan (not verified)

Thanks for reverting on this Lisa.  We are quite confident of the integrated approach to development and have proven this in Malaysia and several other countries in Asia and Africa. The integrated approach will help improve development results dramatically and at the same time address many of the development challenges in developing countries. AS I had alluded in my post, if only we look and take stock rationally but from within the country and from an inside perspective, we can solve the development challenges and poor performance with better outcomes than if we continue with current approaches and current systems. 

 

Am not sure if this is the right forum but am happy to provide more details on the integrated approach to development and how adoption of this integrated approach by governments and donors alike will help improve SDG results substantially.  I strongly believe that we need to approach the SDGs quite differently from the past practices if we wish to make better progress and results than the MDGs.

 

Another important point to consider:  developing countries dont have the luxury of time to move step by step though I know many countries and development partners are prescribing this approach.  We need to assist them proacively and positively with new systems and tools to make the transition and produce better development results much faster.

 

Regards

Aru Rasappan

 

Roberto Borrero (not verified)

 How can the guiding principle of 'Leave no one behind' be put into practice in implementing the 2030 Agenda in different development contexts (e.g. least developed countries, middle-income countries, high-income countries, fragile states etc.)?For Indigenous Peoples, full, effective and meaningful participation is key. States have already affirmed this in the Rio+20 outcome document “The Future We Want”. Paragraph 49 specifically recognizes: “the importance of the participation of indigenous peoples in the achievement of sustainable development” and “the importance of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in the context of global, regional, national and sub-national implementation of sustainable development strategies.”  At the international level, what are challenges to ensuring policy coherence for sustainable development? What are some examples of best practice and/or who are the "trail blazers" leading the way to improved coherence?The Inclusion of Indigenous Peoples in the Global and National indicators will help ensure policy coherence and the commitment of States to recognize the special situations of Indigenous Peoples, which is articulated in the outcome document of recent World Conference on Indigenous Peoples. At paragraph 37, for example, States affirm that “...indigenous peoples have the right to determine and develop priorities and strategies for exercising their right to development. In this regard, we commit ourselves to giving due consideration to all the rights of indigenous peoples in the elaboration of the post-2015 development agenda” How could the UN development system provide coordinated and integrated support for the achievement of the 2030 Agenda?UN development system can work with the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues and the Inter-Agency Support Group as well as the States' "Group of Friends of Indigenous Peoples" to bring the concerns of Indigenous Peoples, in particular, to the forefront of the 2030 Agenda. The Post 2015 Development Agenda should not pave the way to the further marginalization of Indigenous Peoples, but rather seize this unique opportunity to remedy past shortcomings and historic injustices based on inequality. This can only be achieved with the full and effective participation of Indigenous Peoples in the development, monitoring, and evaluation of post-2015 development agenda and the political will of States to respect and implement our rights. The UN system cannot remain neutral in this instance as it is obligated to present these realities to States seeking advice and technical expertise. The SDGs and post-2030 development agenda aspire to “leave no one behind,” however, if the current trends continue to render us invisible; there is little hope that this process will deliver positive changes to the estimated 370 million Indigenous Peoples around the world. 

Lisa Clapier • CEO & Founder at UnifyEvolution.info

Thank you Roberto, for your articulate response on the subject of inclusivity of Indigenous voices, which (in many cases) have many thousand year history as a tribe or clan, and their vote/voices not being included in these dialogues, in the past, is a result of what we have seen in the beginning years of the UN. With cross collaberation, inclusivity and dialogue, forums, even events and celebration, honoring the cultures of peace they contribute to the world family, is unique and vital. There is vast wisdom and unique contributions, even in innovation and technology, which if shared, without a financial goal but a cultural shared experience, makes all the difference. Thank you for your beautiful work, your contribution is vital!

john r bell (not verified)

It is encouraging to see the issue of Indigenous Peoples brought to the table.  If you then place Indigenous Peoples, living with a disability into the discussion, you will have see the challenge of how to include these millions of our world population. It is easy to consider the discussion topics as a goal for those that are best suited to be involved in such change and high hopes.  Although,  this will not truly affect all, it will leave many behind, just as is the status quo today. Truly the challenge is to identify all classes of people, as to understand, who you don't want to leave behind. After 40 years in the field of higher education, advocacy, and direct service development in the third world, most national and international development programs ie: UNDP, USAID...have not addressed the concept on inclusiveness into their scope and mission. Much of the work is left to smaller NGO's, without access to medium to larger funding from these and other international development organizations.  NGO's are left to fend for themselves, seeking small support from local entities and reaching out to individuals and civic groups in the 1st world for funding support. The issue with this type of program development and service model, is that the number and range of services is restricted to the small amounts of funds available, so we in turn leave many behind.John BellTransitions Foundation of Guatemalawww.transitionsfoundation.orgEmail: john@transitionsfoundation.orgLike and Follow us on FacebookOn Thu, Mar 24, 2016 at 11:46 PM, <notification@unteamworks.org> wrote:

You c

Yogesh Sharma (not verified)

We think the topic should be covered and taught at the grassroot level. Schools and colleges need to partake in the discussion and idea. Develpoed countries and citizens of these countries need to be more emphatic and sensitive towards the needs of the underrdeveloped and undeveloped countries. 'leave No one Behind' can see success only if wwe all truly understand and accept the concept. It can work only if we truly beleive this as this is workable and has the capacity to be successful.

We can think of acheiving a sustainable community only  if everyone works together.  Communities need to be accountable for other communities and people. we need to make sure that our community become sustainable, safe, prosperous, collaborative, connected to nature, community and to the global SDG 2030 goals.   Education in schools and in the community and in colleges can become that agent. What we think we are missing in the world right at this moment is Moral values.The kids need to be taught moral values at the school level. we need to become Spiritual if not religious. We need to see 'GOD' in evry other human being. Compassion, kindness and empathy are the values that the communities are built on and sustained.everyone helps..physically, emotionally or spiritually but helps. Imagine a place like that!Sharing whatever we have got with our fellow brothers and sisters will get us there. 

 

Yogesh Sharma

President, Human Rights Snarakshan Sansthaa

India

Lisa Clapier • CEO & Founder at UnifyEvolution.info

Stewards of Life, yes Yogesh! Thank you!

Innately children know these values, as adults we either affirm them 'sustain them' or teach them through modeling, that they do not matter, a cost we are all discovering is to great. Universities are the leverage point we feel, as well, as they are adults, bright, not yet programmed by (hopefully) tragedies of life, and are voting age.

 

Thank you for the value you are bringing to this world!

GEORGES RADJOU (not verified)

Friends,

I am delighted to participate to the teawork. I have read post of others expressing their needs. They are quite right, actually. They are very good posts. I am not going to return on them (except if any question arose). My specific viewpoint is about Post 2015 SDG scope. I think, the most striking point according to BIRD group is tomorrow future of Sustainable Development and how we/interantional community will be able to scope/scale up a giant task (Herculean nearly) in order to materialize the UN goals in various action agenda (2015). I imagine in a postred document (see attachement) that it could happen, if we look at paradigm change and what UNSECGEN Excellency Ban K-moon said about Climate Changes and the Post 2015 SDGs which are both the different sides of the same reality. Please, open my document, as I gave the essential -I think- of what I saw as paramount, which are the taskforce  and the innovation. Thanks. Georges Radjou.

Paul Shaw (not verified)

How do you empower African Rural communities with the SDGs? NAYD is currently forming teams of CBO's for every country in Africa to do this - please read our proposed roadmap, for your comments 

maurice phillips (not verified)

Maurice Philllips:  Director of Sandele Eco-Retreat and Learning Centre, The Gambia and a passionate Global Ecovillage Network devotee.

 

This post is an attempt at a general answer to the three questions posed by the moderator.

“Moving from commitments to results is the UN call”.  “The UN is not an implementing agency” said an earlier post. Correct.  It is for governments and civil society to implement the policies proposed at the UN.

However, the biggest challenge for all societies is that governments are not always so good at implementation, primarily being policy making bodies themselves and typically do not have the resources nor infrastructure needed to implement programmes at the local level.  

Governments have made commitments.  Implementation should be the role taken by communities themselves.  But how?  Communities are not generally empowered to implement policies even though they may be utterly committed to them.

The Global Ecovillage Network (GEN) is an implementing organisation that developed independently of government.  We have pioneered many of the best practices needed for creating a resilient and sustainable community.  GEN supports grass roots action at community level and promotes localised solutions to global challenges. Challenges that deeply affect the lives and livelihoods of the poorest urban and rural communities.   (See: www.ecovillage.org)

GEN is a world-wide organisation that is relatively small without a lot of financial resources; but it has big ambitions.  GEN wants to tackle “the PIG”.  The PIG is the “policy implementation gap” that bedevils organisations throughout the world.  Politicians, CEOs (and managers with big responsibilities in multi-national organisations) hand out policies but rely on the middle and lower ranks to implement them.  It rarely works well, especially in the least developed countries.

Why?  Mostly because of the lack of genuine involvement at grass roots level in the evolution of the policies.  

Another factor that makes the PIG so powerful is that policies developed at international and national level come in “one size fits all” packages.  The SDGs, however, are remarkable in being written in simple language and concern challenges that are universal – albeit is different amounts around the world.

GEN has a major, key policy of its own.  It is that change should be managed by the people it will affect.  GEN achieves this policy by empowering people at grass roots level to be more self-reliant, to hang on to their culture, to generate their own livelihoods, to clean up their environment, and to take care of nature.

GEN is a non-religious, ethical organisation that preaches and practises accountability and transparency and, particularly, emphasises the connectedness that exists between all people. 

A critical fact is that GEN is minute in a world of the very big organisations that pull the strings of power; but yet we include experts, best practices and success stories that are un-paralleled in terms of their integration, comprehensiveness and effectiveness.  Unfortunately however, GEN, like many other civil society organizations and networks, lacks sufficient infrastructure and resources to be able to deliver its services at scale.  That is why GEN is calling on the policy makers to fill in the gap in the middle of the PIG – but not by filling it themselves.  In Africa a move is afoot to call upon governments to adopt GEN type activities by facilitating grass roots action through collaboration between local communities, NGOs and the international donor organisations.  Government, big and small, has two vital roles to play.  First, to decentralise implementation of SDG type policies to NGOs and community groups.  Secondly, to facilitate implementation without direct involvement.

Is this cloud cuckoo land?  Could it ever work?  GEN is holding a strategy meeting at the world famous Sekem ecovillage in Egypt (see: www.sekem.com) in mid-April at which these questions will be posed.  The meeting is called to coincide with a meeting of AMCEN, the Environment Ministers from around Africa.  The Ministers are being invited to visit Sekem and to tour this incredibly successful bio-dynamic farm and ecovillage community, so that a pan-African approach to ecovillage development – and therefore grass roots community development -  can be considered. As we go forward with this project and ecovillage development programme we hope that the international community will take note of and support its many benefits and successes.

ADRIANO CIANI (not verified)

I think that to implment the SDG 2014-2030 all around the world we need:

-To  launch a big communications campain abou the relevance of the Document "Transforming Our World: the Agenda for Sustainable Dvelopment t0 2030";

-To promote in all the world the diffusion ed use of the broad band and the ICT tools suitable  to spread a best practices;

-Implemting a New Model of Governence of Territory as Territorial Contract Management with the streghtening of the Local Communities.

Paye Banza (not verified)

Adriamo, you raised important points, without quality education equally accessible and available for all, there is no other way to harvest local communities contributions, vital for relevant sustainable solutions. Otherwise we might all be passing around as we used to, fatigability! 

1. "launch a big communications campain abou the relevance of the Document" should be a result from every other community mutual SHARING no matter how big or small they are. Everyone has something to contribute and generating local expertise on issues they face with transforming and effective locally oriented solutions. This implies a QUALIT EDUCATION ACROSS to generate capacities:

 http://www.fvtelibrary.com/aboutus 

2.  "promote in all the world the diffusion ed use of the broad band and the ICT tools" Internet everywhere, Education anywhere! If there is a will, #OneWorldOneAcademicLibrary would stay an refferance of INCLUSIVITY around the world. No excuses today that some areas of the planet should continue suffering from poor education due to lake of quality resources mutigating research and knowledge groth. Where internet access will be still a challenge, with mobile eLibrary program on Tablets, we are still able to deliver quality education resources not only in one direction but also promoting local works and inventions for reciprocity. Everyone join to contribute with what they have. SHARING QUALITY RESOURCES WOULD ENSURE EQUALITY OF EDUCATION, EMPORMENT AND ALLOW ALL TO GROW EQUALLY IN KNOWLEDGE AND DEVELOP. BOOST RESEARCH, NO PLAGIARISM AND RE-INVENTION OF THE WHEEL, CREATE EFFECTIVE SOLUTIONS AND NEW KNOWLEDGES FOR RESPECTIVE COMMUNITIES SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT.

3. "New Model of Governence of Territory as Territorial Contract Management", to whatever extend the concept would be applied, a participative way of solving problems would encouraged in association with local expertise created, education is the starting point. It is very important that local communities contribute in solutions swit beeter for their living standards another reason why global education approach with equal sharing opportunity for all would be appropriate. Twitter: @FinalVision1

http:/www.fvtelibrary.com 

 

 

john r bell (not verified)

Thanks for all the comments, for those of us in the field, we garner helpful information from disccusions from well informed and intention folk like yourselves.  Last comment on the issues related to disabilites on this discussion.  According to the WHO:

Developing Countries

Quantitative research on the socioeconomic status of persons with disabilities in developing countries, while small, has recently grown. As with developed countries, descriptive data suggest that persons with disabilities are at a disadvantage in educational attainment and labor market outcomes. The majority of studies find that persons with disability have lower employment rates and lower educational attainment than persons without disability. People with disabilities and their families often incur additional costs to achieve a standard of living equivalent to that of non-disabled people. This additional spending may go towards health care services, assistive devices, costlier transportation options, heating, laundry services, special diets, or personal assistance.

 

Work and Employment

Across the world, people with disabilities are entrepreneurs and self- employed workers, farmers and factory workers, doctors and teachers, shop assistants and bus drivers, artists, and computer technicians. Almost all jobs can be performed by someone with a disability, and given the right environment; most people with disabilities can be productive. But as documented by several studies, both in developed and developing countries, working age persons with disabilities experience significantly lower employment rates and much higher unemployment rates than persons without disabilities. Lower rates of labour market participation are one of the important pathways through which disability may lead to poverty. (And of course being left behind)

Priya Kanayson (not verified)

The transformative nature of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development is a landmark achievement for the United Nations and broader development system, and the guiding principle of ‘Leave no one behind’ is a call to enact policies and programmes that truly reach everyone. As the Agenda emphasises, national context will dictate how the goals and targets are to be reached within each country, but respect for human rights, equality, and inclusion must be paramount and at the centre of all policies.

 Achieving all SDGs will require transformative multisectoral and multistakeholder approaches. Interlinkages across the 17 SDGs and 169 targets should be supported by crosscutting policies and programmes, and implemented through multisectoral partnerships. Additionally, as outlined in the Addis Ababa Action Agenda, increased domestic resource mobilisation must be complemented by continued international development assistance, particularly in least developed countries and fragile states.

 For health, which is a precursor and outcome of achieving many of the targets in the 2030 Agenda, it is crucial that governments and multilaterals do not interpret and operationalise targets as vertical, siloed health programs. Rather, the objective should be to build and strengthen integrated health systems in order to reduce costs, improve efficiency, and achieve better outcomes. For example, the relationship between non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and food and nutrition security, climate change, and sustainable urbanisation, among other issues must be drawn out and acted upon to secure development gains with multiple, mutual benefits.

 The welcome addition of achieving universal health coverage (UHC) by 2030 as a target in the Agenda can aid this transition towards an integrated approach, particularly at the primary healthcare level, as well as a focus on financial risk protection from health care expenditures. Existing service delivery platforms for related health issues, such as for HIV/AIDS, TB, and maternal health, can and should be used to introduce risk assessment, early diagnosis and management of NCDs.

 At the global level, the new universal, sustainable development agenda requires an international community and a UN system that is “fit for purpose”. For health, the leadership and stewardship role of WHO will remain paramount. However, the current Ebola epidemic has highlighted the need for significant reforms and strengthening of WHO, including fundamental changes in its financing, and its agility to engage with non-state actors (i.e. NGOs, and private sector). Sectoral cooperation – both multisectoral and intersectoral – is the cornerstone of political response, and only through such cooperation will countries begin to witness progress towards achieving the SDGs.

 A challenge for the UN system to achieve results in health and NCDs will be to “deliver as one”, a mantra regularly repeated but much less often attained. The grouping of global institutions – sometimes referred to as the H8- and the UN Development Programme (UNDP) can play a complementary and supportive role to WHO. A promising example of coordinated global governance is the recently formed UN Inter-Agency Task Force on NCDs (IATF), which convenes a range of UN agencies to support the NCD response at global and country levels. The UN development system must be fit for purpose to support the needs of countries as they adapt the global goals and targets into national and regional development plans, as each country will be operating within its own situational context. A responsive system is essential for supporting and guiding countries if implementation is to be successful.

 Finally, sustainable financing and achieving the means of implementation as set forth in the Addis Ababa Action Agenda is required for achievement of the SDGs. Though a strong focus on increased domestic resource mobilisation is important, continued international assistance is crucial for many low- and middle-income countries and fragile states.  

Lal Manavado • Senior Advisor at undefined from Norway

Can we really fight the rise of NCD's? Let us look at the real world as it is. The so-called NCD's affect living people throughout the world. Why? It is generally agreed that there are two main causes, viz., nutritional imbalance and insufficeint physical activity relative to the amount of digestible food intake. Why do these two things happen? Is some malevelent force compel its victims to eat inappropriate food, or to stay sedentary? Obviously, this is more a problem of faulty individual judgement than an issue to be resolved by an institutionalised global push, except in one area, which happens to be a taboo in the modern money theology. People eat and drink not just what they can  afford, but rather what it is 'in' or 'cool' or 'easy' to consume. Sales figures for industrial human feed, 'junk food' and 'junk drink' throughout the world will confirm this. This is a 'trend' in every 'emerging economy'. People believe the above items are 'in' 'cool' or 'easy' to consume, because advertisements designed to influence  them are everywhere. Those advertisements are drawn up by experts at mind management, a discipline founded and most effectively practised by the late Dr. Joseph Goebbels, Hitler's famous Reichsminister für Propaganda. He must be proud of his successors for their most effective subtle touch. What's more, it's perfectly legal! What national or international body can compete with advertising industry to change people's beliefs and attitudes? Let us be realistic. And look at the trade agreements that allows multinationals the manufacture and sell NCD promoting commestables of a sort even in the poorest countries. The currently held notion of development focuses so much on technology, which in Europe and US brought about a drastic decline in physical activity. And now, the less developed nations strive to get on that very same band wagon with international blessing. The greatest hindrance  anti-NCD people and the promoters of SDG's face is their refusal to see the reality, viz., inclusion of modern economy as it is will inevitably bring in serious self-contradictions into  whatever plan they may design. Lal Manavado.    From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org]Sent: 25 March 2016 16:01To: Lal ManavadoSubject: [World We Want 2030] Priya Kanayson NCD Alliance - a civil society alliance of over 2000 organisations united in the fight against noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). commented on the Discussion "The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: scope and impl...

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Eskil Ullberg (not verified)

Moving from “more of the same” to “more of the new” incentives may be needed for a policy of truly sustained development

 

Markets in ideas, experimental institutional learning and incentive to take on, and manage, risk for firms and nations.

 

Focusing on the heart of economic development – technology – my comments are related to growth in productivity enhancing technology, using the patent system as a trade system.  This approach builds on a very fundamental human characteristic of creativity to boost productivity, and an institution of property rights 300 years older than economics as a science, started in 1474. Doing “more of the same” cannot sustain development as the marginal gains to productivity are diminishing over time when technology is scaled up. Doing “more of the new”, by contrast, adds new humanly devised technical solutions to development problems, growing the base of technology of the economic system, increasing returns on nature, thus potentially feeding, housing, and helping more people with less resource use.

 

This approach to implement several of the SGDs (most relevant may be goal 9 and target 9.5, encouraging innovation but also goal 8, 10; 4, 5; 6,7 and others as technology development ties into most of the goals.) in short: (1) creates a market in ideas, (2) requires institutional learning for global access by all firm sizes and (3) demands policies of risk taking – not risk avoidance – in order to produce the new for sustained development to be operational. In economic terms: the incentives have to be such that more private firms – everywhere – choose to take on the higher risks of developing the “new” rather than sticking to the lower risks of “more”. To this end risk-reducing institutional arrangements may be key.

 

(For a background note on this topic please consult www.tradeinideas.com, chapter 1 and www.internationalizationandcompetitiveness.com, chapter 6.)

 

My comments will be structured after the three areas (questions) suggested by the moderator.

 

1. Principle of leaving no one behind

 

Markets in ideas – human capital formation transformed into economic development through the patent system.

 

There is a lot of emphasis on education in its own rights, but that does not necessarily lead to development, as the now more educated people have to have equal opportunity to jobs – an “open access society” is needed (Ref. D. North). This means that an internal process of opening the labor markets to the “non-elite” of all societies, in particularly the poor, the young and women is a prerequisite for sustained development (this appears to have been a problem for long but has received high attention in the last decade and century).

 

Such human capital formation needs to be transformed into economic development through trade and markets in new technical ideas – creating productivity – are established through the patent system. The patent system gives the inventor two rights: the right to exclusively use the idea, in exchange for disclosing this previously secretly held invention (a trade secret) to the world, moving the known state of the art forward for all to build on, creating a competition in new technology; and the right to trade or license the idea, creating a market with today global reach. Such markets thus allow local inventors to exchange with the world with promise of returns well beyond the local market. As almost all inventions are motivated by local needs, the all important solutions needed in developing nations can be known to the world and in return create incentives for such a transformation.

 

This indicates a much stronger focus on property rights and contracts to facilitate such transactions.  Remembering that sustained development only can come from a flow of new ideas to solve new and old problems, access to such a market appears central if we are to leave no one behind, and allow all nations to benefit from their human creativity in a sustained way.

 

 

2. Policy coherence for sustained development

 

Sustained development – something we probably have never had over longer periods in history  (ref. to D. North) – requires further institutional learning. There is no rulebook – only examples in kind where almost “everything matters”. Today we think science, technology, innovation and culture are important factors. However, what we know from history, is that “institutions matter, because rules matter and rules matter because incentives matter” (ref. to V. Smith).  It thus appear to be a wise choice to focus on furthering the development of institutions, now focusing on sustained development. However, how important is coherence in this? Institutional learning can best come about through competing initiatives, experimenting with new institutional initiatives at national and international levels where the trading parties learn what really works on the ground. Then, what works could form the basis for coherence. It has not and cannot and been orchestrated from a centrally planned body. The global rules we try to enforce must simply be an acceptance of what has been proven to work – not ideologically driven. Such pragmatism and experience-based learning can only be sped up by further experimenting. The key issue in experimenting is then allowing for international flexibility on certain fronts, to learn faster. When asked this question in 2013 the head of WIPO, a central body in the patent systems, insisted that one aught not to go for global harmonization but for a more competitive approach with different ideas.  That may one day lead to more common rules but they need to be tried out first. This is also most institutional economists view. This was also the conclusion of the people negotiating the first and current international patent system in 1883: harmonization of law was prohibitive and basic principles were chosen.

 

My proposal here is that the principle of competition between systems at rules levels (what is patentable, etc.) could lead to a faster learning regarding which institution we aught to have that promotes sustained development than any other approach. When it comes to procedures however, that could easily be streamlined with today’s information technology. After all, the institutions aught to reduce risk in our coordinated trade and collaboration for all firms and nations and practical experience allows for analysis and thus evidence based policy to be developed.

 

Creating incentives to take such risks must then be matched with a policy of encouraging risk taking, through an institutional frameworks that reduces risks overall. (North again). Focusing on reducing risk in trade between nations – irrespective of size or level of development – would there fore be a policy that may further a more competitive environment in terms of initiatives, creating enthusiasm and spurring initiatives among many nations.

 

3. Providing coordinated and integrated support

 

A key problem appears to be risk-taking. Shifting the incentives toward invention of the new is clearly a more risky undertaking than copying others. The support for the above process may be clearly in the convening power of many UN institutions.

 

The incentives to manage these higher business, entrepreneurial and financial risks then come into focus. Management of risk - it’s all about expanding the taking and managing of risk – and reducing uncertainty in new ideas then may benefit greatly from a coordinated and integrated support promoting the institutional development. The institutions thus reduce uncertainty so that firms interacting with each other can take on higher risks in inventing new ideas.

 

A global dialogue – part of the ECOSOC AMR 2017 and high-level policy meetings – on what are at play for firms developing new technical ideas and engaging in transactions base on patents would be extremely useful. This question is thus interdisciplinary in nature (including but not only a patent system issue) much can be done by addressing support to better managing the business risks involved so much better, that incentives to shift towards sustainable risk taking in “more of the new”.

 

 

March 25, 2016

 

Eskil Ullberg, PhD

 

eskil@ullberg.biz

 

 

Maik Duennbier (not verified)

Thanks for the opportunity to contribute to this E-discussion. It's a privilege for me to contribute answers on behalf of IOGT International.

Concerning question 1: How can the guiding principle of 'Leave no one behind' be put into practice in implementing the 2030 Agenda in different development contexts...?

Children are at great risk of being left behind. They are often the most vulnerable and most marginalized and often lack the power and resources to have a say in matters that concern their well-being. The Agenda 2030 is crucial for the children of the world. To ensure that children are not left behind, decision-makers on all levels - global, regional, national, local - need to make a concerted and coherent effort to follow the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC). The CRC stipulates in Art. 3 the Best Interest principle, compelling signatories to give consideration to the BEST INTEREST of children when making public policy decisions. Children's best interest might not always prevail, when considered relative to other interests, but children's best interest needs to be given due consideration. We are convinced that employing this approach to working with the Agenda 2030 will ensure that children are not left behind.

Concerning question 2: At the international level, what are the challenges to ensuring policy coherence for sustainable development?

We see two challenges: One is to emply a comprehesive, multi-sectorial, horizontal approach across different policy areas. The other one is to address cross-cutting risk factors coherently, for sustainable outcomes across different SDGs.

For example, alcohol use is a major obstacle to development. It's a risk factor for non-communicable diseases. It's a risk factor for infectious diseases such as HIV/ Aids and tuberculosis. It's a risk factor for gender-based violence. It often can drain household finances and thus be a barrier for kids' education. It fuels ill-health and poverty and can lock entire families and communities in the vicious cycle of marginalization, deprivation and poverty.

Evidence shows that alcohol harm puts a burden on 12 out of the 17 SDGs. Alcohol is a cross-cutting risk factor with regard to achieving the Agenda 2030.

Addressing cross-cutting risk factors such as alcohol harm is a massive challenge to achieving policy coherence. On the flipside, there is tremendous potential in tackling cross-cutting risk factors with evidence-based, whole-of-population policy measures. Alcohol policy, particularaly the so called three best buys, carry potential to help achieve targets under 12 out of 17 SDGs. Working from this perspective, rooted in a whole-of-government approach with the understanding of the potential of alcohol policy measures, would mean a great deal in terms of fostering policy coherence and for actually helping achieve the ambitios goals.

Concerning question 3: How could the UN development system provide coordinated and integrated support for the achievement of the Agenda 2030?

The UN system should show leadership with regard to fostering collaboration across different UN agencies and programs and different policy areas. The UN Interagency Task Force on NCDs is an outstanding best practice. Also the joint program of WHO and UNDP is a brilliant and innovative approach to tackling a paramount obstacle to sustainable development: alcohol harm fueling the epidemics of intimate partner violence and infectious diseases.

Through these institutionalized programs and approaches, the UN system offers leadership, coordination and generates momentum.

Humphrey Tonkin (not verified)

Talk of two-way communication and of reaching everyone really doesn't mean much if we cannot engage people in their languages.  It is all too easy to formulate our plans in English, but not at all easy to get feedback from people who either don't understand English or understand it too poorly to formulate a response.  Globalization only extends so far: it does not extend as far as many of the people whom we wish to engage in dialogue.  Here is a brief position paper that my organization recently put together on the neglect of the linguistic dimension to the SDGs...

The SDGs must embrace civil society as well as governments.

The seventeen Sustainable Development Goals recently adopted by the United Nations build on, and go beyond, the Millennium Development Goals, the focus of the UN’s development efforts in the period 2000-2015.  At the time of the launch of the MDGs the representatives of the Member-States made it clear that their successful completion would depend not only on the efforts of governments but also on the efforts of those whom the governments serve – the ordinary citizens who must hold their governments accountable, and the various organizations of civil society which can both provide help in ways that governments cannot and also put pressure on governments to fulfil their commitments.

 

The SDGs are for everyone everywhere.

This outreach to civil society that proved increasingly necessary as the fifteen years of the MDGs proceeded was given particular emphasis in the planning and formulation of the recently announced SDGs for the period 2015-2030.  Civil society, especially in the form of nongovernmental organisations, was involved from the beginning. “This 2030 agenda is for everyone everywhere,” remarked Helen Clark, Administrator of the UN Development Program and former Prime Minister of New Zealand, in a recent meeting on the SDGs.  The SDGs, added Erna Solberg, Prime Minister of Norway, constitute “the largest development dialogue the world has ever seen.” “It is important to listen to the voices of the people,” remarked Phan Binh Minh, the Deputy Prime Minister of Viet-Nam, in that same meeting.

 

The SDGs must involve dialogue as well as monologue, listening as well as talking.

In short, as these political leaders suggerst, we are looking at an effort that involves everyone – in a dialogue, a two-way conversation, on development – and a dialogue in which it is important to listen to the voices of the people rather than dictate solutions to them in the one-sided, top-down development process that in the past was all too common in international development circles and also at the national level. 

 

The dimension of language is largely missing from the SDGs.

Yet, while the talk is of dialogue, and of listening as well as talking, somehow this does not translate into an awareness of language itself.  It is striking that the dimension of language is barely mentioned in most discussions of the SDGs, and not at all in the seventeen goals themselves.  The “dialogue” to which Prime Minister Solberg refers is conducted overwhelmingly in English, and to a lesser degree in other major languages.  Yet the people at whom so many of the goals are directed – particularly those dealing with such fields as poverty, education, and literacy – often do not speak the language or languages of the policymakers.  Often they belong to language minorities with little voice in their own countries, and certainly not in the wider world.  As Suzanne Romaine, of Oxford University, puts it, citing Clinton Robinson, “Use of local languages is inseparable from participatory development. Local people will not own development until they can discuss it among themselves and with outsiders without the barrier of someone else’s language.”

 

Are we listening?

Yet are we listening to these voices?  Are their governments listening?  Are the NGOs listening?  As the editors of the journal Reconsidering Development recently stated, “International development exists inside language; we do not have international development without language” – but is the dialogue truly a two-way dialogue?

 

Language lies at the very core of human communication.

When, a couple of years ago, the Canadian scholar Mark Fettes examined the eighteen “think pieces” put out by the United Nations System Task Team in the early stages of formulating the SDGs, he was startled to find that this “group of senior experts from over 50 UN entities and international organizations appointed by the Secretary-General” mentioned language only a total of four times in the entire length of all eighteen documents, and then only in connection with other “indicators of diversity, inequality or discrimination,” never as a factor in its own right.  Yet language choice and language use have a direct effect on the efficacy of political engagement, on the effectiveness of education, on legal processes, on human rights.  Language is a major factor in the inclusion or exclusion of particular populations, and sadly is often used as an instrument of discrimination and disempowerment.  It seems odd that people of goodwill (and we have no doubt about the goodwill of our UN colleagues in the field of development) should accord so little attention to the linguistic processes that lie at the very core of human communication.

 

The United Nations must pay greater attention to language in development.

The Universal Esperanto Association, an NGO associated with both the Economic and Social Council and the Department of Public Information at the United Nations, is interested not only in the promotion of the International Language Esperanto but also in the elimination of all forms of discrimination, including linguistic discrimination, and in the advancement of all basic human rights, including linguistic rights.  It is one of only a very few NGOs concerned with issues of language.  It is pursuing a two-part strategy in connection with the Sustainable Development Goals.  First, it is using its worldwide network of Esperanto speakers to advance the SDGs and urging the members of this network to intervene with their governments in support of the SDGs.  Second, it is urging the United Nations in the strongest possible terms to pay greater attention to language issues and to recognize that effective communication and inclusive language policies go hand in hand.

 

Translating words into action involves attention to language.

In a recent article, Kathy Calvin, president and CEO of the United Nations Foundation, and R. Venkataramanan of the Tata Trusts, pointed out that “We are in a new era of development that recognizes the need for fresh approaches and engagement from all sectors. These lessons can help the international community move beyond traditional models and strengthen public-private partnerships so we can translate our next set of global goals from words to lasting change.” The authors’ choice of metaphors merits a second look: they talk of translating global goals from words to lasting change. Such translation will not be realised if we do not listen to the languages of those we wish to include, nor will words produce lasting change unless the words are their words as well as ours, and the lasting change a result of change on the part of all.

Humphrey Tonkin

UN representative, Universal Esperanto Association

Lal Manavado • Senior Advisor at undefined from Norway

A terrific point, Prof. Tomkins!  I am very happy to see your contribution which addresses a general problem so succintly. In some of my remarks, I have touched on this point with reference to its importance in a specific field, planning education  and elearning for instance. Political leaders often say the obvious, but the inspired mien they can easily assume when saying such, and the context, make the general public hope for the best even when their reason warns them against such maivate.  Yes, when would they ever learn? Small local civil society units seem to offer the only rational means towards a somewhat improved future for the deprived. Lal Manavado. From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org]Sent: 27 March 2016 03:12To: Lal ManavadoSubject: [World We Want 2030] Humphrey Tonkin Professor from United States commented on the Discussion "The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: scope and implications"

galma t. arcilla (not verified)

THE 2030 AGENDA FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT: SCOPE AND IMPLICATIONS
How can the guiding principle of “Leave no one behind” be put into practice in implementing the 2030 Agenda in different development contexts (e.g. least developed countries, middle-income countries, high-income countries, fragile states, etc.)?

The common and universal agenda to eliminate poverty, to promote global peace, and to sustain prosperity via planetary protection and preservation is an ambitious objective. This is view of the differing levels of development among participating member States. This disparity in human and natural resources, the unequal conditions for sustained economic development, and the disproportionate capacities of developing and underdeveloped countries to absorb and sustain the impact of the soon-coming economic development pose great challenge to the 2030 Agenda of the United Nations.

The principle of “leaving no one behind” is rhetoric for humanitarian intervention among less- and least-developed countries. The quest for global sustainable development by the year 2030 requires redistribution of wealth among participating countries. This redistribution of wealth – technological, natural, and commercial should be judicious and equitable such that a standard benchmark of development is attained by all member States. This means a global economic integration wherein the flow of goods, the protection of raw and natural resources, the peaceful conditions for a sustained commercial growth are to be put in place and then sustained for lasting prosperity and eradication of poverty.

This sustainable development agenda is supposed to be achieved by 2030. This translates to the adoption of common global economic policies and the implementation of national priorities attuned and aligned to this global agenda. The present inequalities of member economies must be solved and be eliminated. The present national predicaments of under- and least-developed countries must be transformed and remodeled such that preconditions for the elimination of poverty, eradication of diseases, elimination of social equality and the promotion of dignity among women and vulnerable sectors of society are achieved. World peace is attainable only where there is commitment among member countries to eliminate external aggression and engagement to war. This could be done initially by eliminating threats to national extinction – global disarmaments and the resolution of insurgency and ideological conflicts that often lead to property destruction, loss of lives, hunger, diseases, and retrogression of economic growth. Peace is thus understood as the absence of war and the cessation of hostilities that lead to intra- and international conflicts.

At the international level, what are the challenges to ensuring policy coherence for sustainable development? What are some examples of best practices and/or who are the “trail blazers” leading the way to improved coherence?

The challenges to ensuring policy coherence are basically rooted on the refusal to abide with or the non-compliance of member States to the principles and commitments of Agenda 2030. In such cases, the enforcement of the prior commitment of member States to the UN Resolution adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on 27 July 2012, otherwise known as the Rio de Janeiro Manifesto for The Future We Want, is in order. The applicable commitments or affirmations demanding enforcements are the following:

23. We reaffirm the importance of supporting developing countries in their efforts to eradicate poverty and promote empowerment of the poor and people in vulnerable situations, including removing barriers to opportunity, enhancing productive capacity, developing sustainable agriculture and promoting full and productive employment and decent work for all, complemented by effective social policies, including social protection floors, with a view to achieving the internationally agreed development goals, including the Millennium Development Goals.

. .

26. States are strongly urged to refrain from promulgating and applying any unilateral economic, financial or trade measures not in accordance with international law and the Charter that impede the full achievement of economic and social development, particularly in developing countries.

27. We reiterate our commitment, expressed in the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation, the 2005 World Summit Outcome and the outcome document of the High-level Plenary Meeting of the General Assembly on the Millennium Development Goals of 2010, to take further effective measures and actions, in conformity with international law, to remove the obstacles to the full realization of the right of self-determination of peoples living under colonial and foreign occupation, which continue to adversely affect their economic and social development as well as their environment, are incompatible with the dignity and worth of the human person and must be combated and eliminated.

Economic integration could only be advanced and coherence be monitored if member States are found to be compliant and observing faithfully these foregoing affirmations. While it is true that member countries have different capacities and diverging priorities, but without solid and firm commitments towards global sustainable development, developing countries and fragile states will be left behind in this global quest. Barriers to progress have to be eliminated, and the hindrances to the adoption and implementation of the 2030 Agenda be first identified, then resolved, and be eradicated completely. Unless the international policy roadmaps are not adopted and shared, policy coherence will never rise beyond national boundaries.

The experiences of the European Nation, from its initial creation as the European Economic Council until its full economic and administrative integration as the European Union could serve as the model for economic integration and development. The UN Agenda 2030 could very well evaluate the faults, the failings, and the flaws of the European Union in order for the United Nations to come up with an improved and perfected system of governance and economic redistribution among its member economies. Aside from the success of the European Union, there is no regional body of member-countries that could come close to their experience in implementing a more successful integration of economies and putting them under one administrative control and supervision.

How could the UN development system provide coordinated and integrated support for the achievement of the 2030 Agenda?

The 2030 is thus a utopian agenda crafted by the United Nations to protect the interest of the most vulnerable economies today. Within fifteen years, the necessary technological and commercial infrastructure must first be put in place, before a nationwide transformation in policies and economic priorities are implemented. This means that global standards for doing intra- and international commerce must first be implemented and using recent technological advancements as monitoring systems for compliance, monitoring and evaluation. A common technological roadmap must first be installed before any administrative policies are implemented. Without a system of effective monitoring of compliance to these provisions and affirmation of the 2030 Agenda, the United Nations vision will remain an illusion.

Moreover, the engagement of civil societies that are accredited by the United Nations shall serve as “international police” to monitor, report, and ensure compliance of and among member-economies. This is most true among fragile states and developing countries where the issue of political divisions cause much economic regression, proliferation of graft and corrupt practices, and inequality among people in their sovereign nations. An effective system of check-and-balance or of responsibility and accountability must be put in place as a matter of implementation and monitoring of sustained compliance. National transformation must be monitored and evaluated to eliminate defects and flaws that hinder sustained economic growth and the protection of human rights.

THE 2030 AGENDA FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT: NATIONAL IMPLEMENTATION

How can the SDGs be effectively mainstreamed into relevant national sustainable development policies and programmes, while preserving countries’ policy space to pursue national priorities? How can the UN development system best support this?

National sustainable development policies and programmes must be fine tuned or realigned to the global policies and programmes of the United Nations 2030 Agenda. Since member States have already signed their decisions to support and made affirmations to implement the provisions of the 2030 Agenda of the United Nations, independent national policies and programmes that veer away from the directions of this Agenda shall be discouraged, or be encouraged on a short-term basis. This depends on the impact on the respective national development efforts of member countries.

Without firm and resolute commitment to implement the objectives of the UN 2030 Agenda, the envisioned global and societal transformations by 2030 will never materialize. But taking into consideration the present commitments and priorities of other lesser developed and developing economies, there shall deadlines and timelines when the pursuit of this global Agenda be pursued faithfully by these member countries.

Members of the UN system that are stationed or in-residence to these member-countries should employ the participation and engagement of civil societies and private organizations to hasten the implementation of this global UN Agenda. Since most developing countries are heavily politicized when it comes to crafting national and international policies, there must be a system of accountability wherein these member-countries are going to mainstream the global UN Agenda in their respective government operations. Civil societies and private organizations could likewise serve as conduits of national development by the United Nations, instead of merely relying on mainstream government to implement national developmental efforts. Sensitive infrastructures that do not infringe on national security issues could be implemented by non-government organizations and other private organizations for faster socio-economic transformation of developing and underdeveloped economies. In this manner, affirmation of human rights and the promotion of national security remain secure in the hands of the government. However, on a deeper analysis, poverty is another form of human rights violation. If there are means to eliminate instances of poverty and social depravities, the State is duty bound to ensure that the welfare and the social and moral well-being of its citizens are met and protected. Hence, there should be no barriers in the employment of civil societies and other private organization in meeting the needs – public and private – of the people.

Meanwhile, the technical and technological infrastructure of the global network for mainstreaming and monitoring compliance of member countries must be put in place parallel to the development efforts of underprivileged economies. The global infrastructure on trade and commerce, communication, and transportation must be facilitated earlier while mainstreaming of global policies are being elaborated and in the process of adoption by member countries.

Climate change and other economic hindrances to sustainable development must be eliminated where these factors continue to ravage less- or least-developed countries. High-income economies should extend all necessary assistance to speed up the transformation processes for these lagging economies. Otherwise, the agreed 15-year timeframe might proved too short and too idealistic if there is no intervention extended among lagging economies. The principle of “leaving no one behind” must be initiated even at the earliest stage of adoption by member-countries. Otherwise, these lagging economies might be hampered by too much poverty and too much politics in adopting and implementing these UN 2030 Agenda for sustainable development.

What are the key areas for making progress on and building national and sub-national capacities for sustainable development, and how do they differ across country contexts (e.g., least developed countries, middle income countries, high-income countries, countries in situations of fragility, etc.)? When and how can partnerships effectively contribute to capacity building and sustainable development?

The UNDESA and the UNDP should guide and assist participating countries in formulating monitoring forms wherein the Key Result Areas (17 Sustainable Development Goals) are given timelines for adoption and implementation of these goals, including the identification of implementing agencies, resources needed, and the desired results at a certain evaluation period. A monitoring and evaluation matrix of adoption and development should be submitted by member-countries to the implementing body/ies of the United Nations. These government matrices of implementation should be the bases also for fund infusion and other means of assistance whereby substantial success is achieved by least developed and developing economies. As no unilateral program of national government that runs inconsistent with the 2030 Agenda will be allowed, monitoring of government agencies in charge of implementing UN Agenda provisions shall be held accountable for timely and effective implementation of these goals.

UN financial institutions shall review and extend financial assistance to all development efforts of member-countries as reflected in their respective medium-term development plans. These National Medium Term Development Plans shall serve as the member-country’s commitment to adopt and implement the UN Agenda for 2030. Through this national socio-economic plan, strategic financing of development, strategic partnership in the implementation of these high-impact or relevant policies, programmes and projects are implemented effectively and without delays. The civil society partners of the United Nations shall ensure that their respective governments are moving along the lines of Agenda 2030. These alternative service mechanisms shall submit to the UN their reports and observations on the successful or failed implementation of these funded programs and projects.

A system of accountability is thus put in place, whereby the UN is assured of credible monitoring results while national governments measure their success or failure based on their targeted National Medium Term Development Plans. In reality, these national Medium Term Development Plans could incorporate Regional or Global Sustainable Development Goals aligned to the objectives of the 2030 UN Agenda. Among the Key Result Areas to be compared, monitored, and synchronized for global sustainable development are the following:

§ Stable and sustainable macro-economy of every member-nation
§ Industry and services sectors made globally competitive and innovative
§ Agricultural and fisheries modernization
§ National infrastructure development
§ Energy self-sufficiency and conservation
§ National Information and Communications Technology deployment and competitiveness
§ National social infrastructure to ensure poverty alleviation
§ Financial capability and resiliency of member-nations
§ Good governance and adherence to the rule of law
§ Social development – health, nutrition, and population management
§ Education, training and skills improvement
§ Housing and shelter provision and protection
§ Peace and security issues of the nation and people
§ Conservation of natural resources and environmental protection
§ Climate change mitigation and adaptation

What steps are necessary to ensure that all stakeholders, including the government, private sector and civil society can readily exchange information and experiences? How can “peer exchange” be established and nurtured?

National governments and UN representatives should form a multi-sectoral bodies that will monitor the progress of adoption and the success of implementing projects and programs that would eliminate poverty in and among member-countries. The services of the resident UN bodies and accredited UN none-government organizations should be recognized and be given a hand in monitoring and implementing the relevant provisions of the 2030 UN Agenda. This is without prejudice to the monitoring of issues contributing to the failure or lack of compliance among participating countries.

“Peer exchange” or the exchange of files and information among participants to monitor, review, and revise certain policies and protocols in the implementation of these SDGs should be established early. “Benchmarking” of progress and development must be closely monitored by the UN and with the participation of host national economies to ensure transparency and honesty in adopting the sustainable goals of the UN 2030 Agenda. Through the ICT infrastructure of national government, the monitoring body of the UN should be connected to this governmental communication infrastructure such that systematic guidance and reviews of programs and projects under monitoring are kept within the allowable limits of success or failure in implementation.

THE 2030 AGENDA FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT: FOLLOW UP AND REVIEW

What are the key components of a comprehensive national review process? What capacities will need to be strengthened at the national level in order to conduct the necessary reviews? How can accountability and transparency of the review process be supported?

The United Nations should provide common guidelines with common Key Result Areas (KRAs) for implementation and monitoring and with indicators on how effective or efficient did these countries implement these KRAs. The UN 2030 Agenda Oversight Committee should establish benchmarks indicating compliance and non-compliance, strengths and weaknesses, deficiencies and sufficiency of national development programs in the context of their recent economic status. Each member country shall adopt the United Nations common standards for labor, socio-economic and environmental programs. As universal access to funding is made available to finance development and to uproot underdevelopment, a common financing platform for all member-countries should be put in place.

The UN Oversight Committee should impose further common and coordinated efforts to monitor the status and the stability of member-nations at the macro- and micro-economic levels. This is to ensure that there will be compliance and common understanding of the UN 2030 Agenda in fostering comprehensive and sustainable means of funding development for all member-nations. These efforts should be based on common and global financial regulations applicable and imposable among recipient countries. This common regulation would thus regulate also the illicit flow of funding from sources not otherwise approved by the UN Oversight Committee.

Each country shall submit for review, implementation, and monitoring their respective National Medium Term Development Plans that take into account the present status of national development program and economic projections. These national development plans must be fine tuned, aligned and synchronized, and then be closely monitored by the UN Oversight Committee to ensure faithful compliance with the common platform. For those poor and underdeveloped economies, How can they be restructured economically to catch up with their developed counterparts must be given extra attention by the UN Oversight Committee. If poverty elimination is to be eliminated by 2030, then debt structuring, sustainable economic growth and unprecedented industrialization efforts must be put in place in order for these least developed countries (LDCs) to move on the economic ladder.

In the same vein, technology transfer from developed economies must also be done and must include all least developed countries (in the technology loop of the UN Agenda. Sane thing is true for scientific advancements that are now being enjoyed by the modern societies. Upgrading of social, technological, and economical status by and among these LDCs must be the main priorities of the UN 2030 Agenda. Redistribution of wealth, technology, scientific researches and development, as well resiliency of environmental conditions to combat global challenges of climate change must be put in place also, with urgency, among these LDCs and fragile economies.

The UN 2030 Agenda Oversight Committee must also demand fine tuning of national development efforts with the goals and objectives of the UN 2030 Agenda. The respective national Medium Term Development Plans of member-countries should reflect the overall visions and strategies of implementation by the UN Oversight Committee. These developmental demands could also be incorporated or form part of the over-all Regional or Global Sustainable Development Agenda that is aligned to the objectives of the 2030 UN Agenda. Among the Key Result Areas to be compared, monitored, and synchronized for global sustainable development are the following:

§ Stable and sustainable macro-economy of every member-nation
§ Industry and services sectors made globally competitive and innovative
§ Agricultural and fisheries modernization
§ National infrastructure development
§ Energy self-sufficiency and conservation
§ National Information and Communications Technology deployment and competitiveness
§ National social infrastructure to ensure poverty alleviation
§ Financial capability and resiliency of member-nations
§ Good governance and adherence to the rule of law
§ Social development – health, nutrition, and population management
§ Education, training and skills improvement
§ Housing and shelter provision and protection
§ Peace and security issues of the nation and people
§ Conservation of natural resources and environmental protection
§ Climate change mitigation and adaptation

From macro level, the implementation and adoption of the UN 2030 Agenda should be monitored down to the micro level to ensure compliance to the common developmental platform of the 2030 Agenda. National accountability should pass through the lens of the Regional Councils and ultimately to the Global Council of the UN 2030 Agenda. However, at the National level, there should be a composite team from the UN Global, Regional, and National Levels that would monitor and follow up compliances and adoptions of these global sustainable development agenda.

How can the follow-up and review at the regional and global level – including through a strong High-level Political Forum under the auspices of the ECOSOC and the newly created ECOSOC-Forum on Financing for Development – facilitate the achievement of the SDGs?

The ECOSOC Forum shall serve as the main avenue to discuss, evaluate, and address developmental concerns by member-countries, based on reports from the national, regional, and global levels of the UN 2030 Agenda Committee. The SDGs shall serve as the baseline developmental efforts of all member-nations and the implementation of which shall be coursed through national governments, with the ready assistance of the regional UN bodies to urgently and immediately address brewing issues of non-compliance or incapacities of fragile economies on the adoption and implementation of these SDGs.

A third and objective monitoring and evaluation efforts should be given by civil society groups or non-government organizations accredited by the UN ECOSOC to participate and monitor the implementation of these SDGs. A “whole of nation” approach that includes the presence and participation of NGOs and civil society groups in the Political Forum should be encouraged. This all-level system of monitoring and implementation of SDGs at the national and regional levels could be given immediate attention and solution by the Committee on global implementation.

Financing and economic regulation concerns are thus easily addressed and resolved to the minutest satisfaction of the global committees. Trade and economic barriers that differ among nations are either eliminated or eased up to allow the smooth flow of goods and commerce in every regional bodies, as well as to the global synchronization of all member countries.

What steps need to be taken to put in place the evidence base (i.e., established, new and emerging sources of data and monitoring capacities) to help track progress on the 2030 Agenda and inform decision-making where course correction is needed?

Global implementation of SDGs require the establishment of a global communication infrastructure that would hasten decision-making processes in addressing inequality of wealth and natural resources and disparity in national capacities of member countries. A “Third Force” a community of non-government organizations should be tapped and be connected to the global communications system to monitor implementation of these global SDGs. This “Third Force” shall facilitate national adoption and the elimination of barriers in implementing business and social processes outside of the ambit of bureaucratic systems. A regional, national, and sub-national communication infrastructure should be established such that facilitation of compliance and elimination of negative factors are easily addressed. This global communication facility should keep track of all levels of adoption and implementation. It should include a global network of organizations that are not subject to bureaucratic restraints that would impinge national sovereignty.

A global benchmarking system is thus a necessity to establish an “evidence-based” monitoring system. This would help global mangers determine the accountability and responsibility of member-nations as they implement the global SDGs. In this manner, fine tuning and aligning of national policies are tracked and re-oriented to keep pace with the growth of other member-nations. A global compliance index is thus secured and put in place, plus a global accountability map is formulated ensuring that no one is left behind in the sustainable development agenda of the UN 2030.

Ethan McLaughlin (not verified)

Okay so in order to adaquatly approach answering the large question of how to implement 2030, I will be approaching it by answering each question one by one. 

So firstly in order to truly understand and appreciate how best to find some kind of universal approach of implementation across the many different types of countries which occuppy this earth we inhabit, its important to appreciate how diverse the world is. As such implementation in order for  it to be successful each country needs guidelines to judge and shape their policies around. The issue is however that one set of guidlines on how a government must implement the agenda will not work and would in fact be rather counter productive. I think first and foremost because their are roughly 18 different target some which needs greater focus in certain regions in the world than others. As such their needs to be a greater appreciation of the usefulness of regional multilateral organisations like  the EU like the African Union, in there ability to be able to shape there own regional agenda based on their values, and their  peoples belives of goverance. This is also very useful because of  the fact fragile states in those particular regions are more likely to be influnced by their region than an organisation like the UN, who it could see or judge the mandate to be against its interest.  

 

Now looking at the second section if we are talking about trail brazlers, or best practise to ensure policy coherance I think this very much relates to my previous point. In order to allow for policy coherance there needs to be greater focus  on the success a regionally based agenda can have.

 

 

Ethan McLaughlin (not verified)

Okay so in order to adaquatly approach answering the large question of how to implement 2030, I will be approaching it by answering each question one by one. 

So firstly in order to truly understand and appreciate how best to find some kind of universal approach of implementation across the many different types of countries which occuppy this earth we inhabit, its important to appreciate how diverse the world is. As such implementation in order for  it to be successful each country needs guidelines to judge and shape their policies around. The issue is however that one set of guidlines on how a government must implement the agenda will not work and would in fact be rather counter productive. I think first and foremost because their are roughly 18 different target some which needs greater focus in certain regions in the world than others. As such their needs to be a greater appreciation of the usefulness of regional multilateral organisations like  the EU like the African Union, in there ability to be able to shape there own regional agenda based on their values, and their  peoples belives of goverance. This is also very useful because of  the fact fragile states in those particular regions are more likely to be influnced by their region than an organisation like the UN, who it could see or judge the mandate to be against its interest.  

 

Now looking at the second section if we are talking about trail brazlers, or best practise to ensure policy coherance I think this very much relates to my previous point. In order to allow for policy coherance there needs to be greater focus  on the success a regionally based agenda can have.

 

 

Paye Banza (not verified)

As far as EDUCATION, base of any development, is concerned, we suggest moving forward based on what is available to improve and where there is none, in most area in developing countries, start from scratch; http://www.fvtelibrary.com/aboutus . The DIGITAL revolution era and Internet have made it easy to deliver same quality education contents that none is left behind and resources are available anywhere at any time needed! INTERNET CONNECTIVITY should be a concern, OFFLINE feature of the Platform all to deliver resources pre-loaded on TABLETS and updated any time needed! It is easy than ever to dispatch quality education resources for mutual sharing of same quality material and cooperate on research projects to ensure reciprocity.

 #OneWorldOneAcademicLibrary allows all to SHARE same quality education resources starting from Canadian education institutions resources, boost research, frees invention spirit and avoid PLAGIARISM and re-invention of the wheel, gives a chance for all to grow equally in Knowledge, create new ones and develop! In addition, all communities, regardless geographic locations have same opportunity to do and manage their own to SHARE SELECTIVELY with the world while creating and developing effective solutions should fit better address respective local need to sustain development and climate change initiatives. Every community shapes its own Local, National, Continental or international agenda based on what they believe, their values with option share with others what they want, such an empowering enough to expect local competency and knowledge harvest from initiatives people made, believe and trust in.

Twitter: @FinalVision1

 

Lal Manavado • Senior Advisor at undefined from Norway

A very questionable thesis indeed. This notion of education seems to be unteble because it does not take into account some elementary facts, viz., functiona and total illiteracy, global linguistic variation which is a cultural right of peoples, levels of individual capacities for learning , and the crux, what should enable one to undertake? Is the answer the kind of work most popular today? Ah, it is that aspect of economy that has brought about the current misery and suffering. Lal Manavado. From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org]Sent: 28 March 2016 19:29To: Lal ManavadoSubject: [World We Want 2030] Paye Banza Sales Manager from Canada commented on the Discussion "The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: scope and implications"

Lal Manavado • Senior Advisor at undefined from Norway

Helping the poor in Dollar terms; is this the way to go? I wholeheartely agree with  your intention, but have difficulties with the yardstick you have chosen. On paper, increased income may seem to indicate an alleviation of poverty. But, if the cost of living of the poor has risen in step, one has not achieved much. Nor yet the poor have to live under appalling conditions. I think the poor will consider a reduction in their food items as a real boon, when higher wages entail higher food prices. Lal Manavado. From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org]Sent: 26 March 2016 00:04To: Lal ManavadoSubject: [World We Want 2030] Hüseyin Mahir FİSUNOGLU commented on the Discussion "The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: scope and implications"

Yo

John Lawrence

One contribution in this discussion stood out to me, from Cameroun, Federation of Environmental and Ecological Diversity for Agricultural Revampment and Human Rights ( FEEDAR & HR ) 

 as follows:

Many little businesses face a critical challenge of the inability to secure Loans and benefits from Banks. It therefore very important for financial institutions to leveraging opportunities for all and not only for the rich.

Small business is not only the present, but the future of sustainable development, yet there is very little in this discussion that I have seen on the private sector and its contribution to sustainable human progress.... even the current movement towards corporate social responsibility (CSR) seems targeted mostly towards large multinational enterprises.. furthermore, economic theory specifies `growth' as a necessary condition for societal advancement, speaking  hardly at all about better, more efficient management and utilization of existing resources... the SDGs required extensive participation of stakeholders in their designation and definition... they will also need universal commitment  to their achievement, and that includes business at all levels...how can we elicit commercial interest, locally, in this quest?

Dr. Timothy Barker (not verified)

For me the real problem is one of needing to persuade our historically imbued institutional instruments to adapt to allow such multidimensional issues as these to be fairly, democratically explored. See shamblaba DOT org DOT uk for a socio-technological prototype. Sadly, there are individuals and groups who become adept at manipulating those in 'authority' with the result of policy becoming skewed in favour of those who 'shout the loudest' or perhaps those who are funded the most? Everybody deserves a voice - "leave no one behind" - yet how should we achieve this? Not everyone has access to these technologies, for instance (as I am sure we're all aware). Can we reply upon the status quo to adapt **in time** for this is a time critical mission? Can those with 'power' relinquish it so that a more representative version of a global narrative emerges FROM THE GROUND UP? I like education in this regard. So what I am proposing is a kind of meta narrative where all these various influences are right and proper, that's indisputable - there are a lot of valid issues being explored here, for example - but its the mechanisms, the instruments of bringing about change that really need to be addressed in a sensitive and considered manner. If not enacted accordingly then structural change will fail and we (or our ancestors) will still be 'sitting around' discussing these same issues well into the next century, at least. To sum, I personally don't have all the answers but I have a whole host of questions that are not being asked - I would like to see those 'meta', principally structural questions answered please?

Lal Manavado • Senior Advisor at undefined from Norway

Other things being equal ... At the risk of sounding theoretical, which I am not, other things being equal,  the main issue Dr. Barker raises seems to be the inability/unwillingness of government institutions to make their policies congruent on six fundamental areas, viz., nutrition, education in its broadest sense, health, security in its widest sense, sustainable human procreation, and what I have called our non-material needs like aesthetic satisfaction, leisure activities, etc. It is amazing that those in authority seems unable to appreciate that energy, water supplies, economic persuits, etc., are simply secondary or even teritiary means required to satisfy the above six fundamental needs.  It is incredible that most participants here appear to believe that job creation and economy as ends in themselves! So, in formulation of congruent policies,  agricultural policy ought to be in harmony with health policy as well as the policy on environment. Likewise, the economic policy should be congruent with health and environment policies. If the trade policy allows the imports of unhealthy food, it would obviously undercut what one attempts to achieve by  the health policy, and so on. The vital importance of  a healthy environment as a whole, not just global warming,  does not seem to have sunk into the minds of those who are in a position to do something positive about environmental regeneration, not just stop further abuse of it. It would be salutory for anyone to read some 19th century travellers' comments on the Brazilean rain forest, Indonesian archipelago, Africa etc. They lamment  that none has cleared up the forests and 'developed' the areas so that they may support millions more! Now, most of those areas have undergone 'development', and they can hardly support a flock of hardy goats. Reductive thought has given to economy  a role akin to that enjoyed by religions in the middle ages. So, anyone who questions its importance and wishes to  place it in its proper place, would be treated the same way as every  heretic was during those good old days but with one little difference. Instead of an honest auto de fe (it is unfair to call it in Portuguese as it is often done), the heretic will be simply ignored, perhaps, this is the way democracy displays its torarance. Now, to my next point; Hunger and ill health require immediate action, while the other needs require sustained long-term efforts. These require financial, intellectual, and other material resources. However, an inordinate portion of world's total real financial and material resources,  are sequestered in comparatively few private hands, and as such will not be forthcoming unless they can profit from it. What would enable them to profit by it entails engaging in the same type of economic activity, which together with greed and selfishness has brought about the human misery we  observe today.  This seems to be the way the majority want to take, I never thought that there would ever be any proponents of Catch-22 as a development strategy. Lal Manavado. From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org]Sent: 04 April 2016 12:21To: Lal ManavadoSubject: [World We Want 2030] Dr. Timothy Barker from United Kingdom commented on the Discussion "The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: scope and implications"

Paye Banza (not verified)

The Quality of Education only could ensure all are equal and NONE IS LEFT BEHIND! There is growing concerns behind Quality Education Resources DIVIDE same as DIGITAL DIVIDE worries are! Shouls get same awereness, we are in for humble contribution with a practical approach boosting solidarity around education through mutual SHARING!

Quality Education consist of up to date Library and Research. “The technology allows students to do research and to develop critical thinking” #OneWorldOneAcademicLibrary for Mutual Quality Education Resources sharing with CANADA and the WORLD to close the GAP. All grow equally in knowledge and Develop.

ATTENTION!!!

 STUDENTS AND RESEARCHERS should make a difference between SEARCH (on a search engine like GOOGLE etc ...) and RESEARCH! While one WASTES time with irrelevant and inappropriate materials in most cases the other with TRUE RESEARCH, keeps you 100% on task. AIDDE platform is not a search engine!https://twitter.com/FinalVision1/status/716326784938209282 

Courtesy of http://www.fvtelibrary.com

 

Tokunbo Lijadu-Oyemade (not verified)

Dear Moderator,

Thank you for a comprehensive and yet strategicly conclusive summary of this discussions.  I see a future that's progressive by sheer interdependence of development actors all things being equal.  The aportioning of role-plays to different partners in the process has not been forgotten either.  All in all, its a good summary which we do hope will be considered and aceeded to by state and non-state actors  as the way forward towards  ensuring that none is left behind during the process and period of implementation of Agenda 2030.  

We look forward to future opportunities and priviledges of contributing our own little quota to any subject on global development in future.  This has been a rewarding exchange.

Cheers.

Tokunbo Lijadu-Oyemade (not verified)

Dear Moderator,

Thank you for a comprehensive and yet strategicly conclusive summary of this discussions.  I see a future that's progressive by sheer interdependence of development actors all things being equal.  The aportioning of role-plays to different partners in the process has not been forgotten either.  All in all, its a good summary which we do hope will be considered and aceeded to by state and non-state actors  as the way forward towards  ensuring that none is left behind during the process and period of implementation of Agenda 2030.  

We look forward to future opportunities and priviledges of contributing our own little quota to any subject on global development in future.  This has been a rewarding exchange.

Cheers.