National Implementation

29 Feb - 25 Mar 2016
Go back to 2016 ECOSOC discussion – Implementing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development
  • How can the SDGs be effectively mainstreamed into relevant national sustainable development policies and programmes, while preserving countries' policy space to pursue national priorities? How can the UN development system best support this?
  • What are key areas for making progress on and building national and sub-national capacities for sustainable development, and how do they differ across country contexts (e.g. least developed countries, middle income countries, high-income countries, countries in situations of fragility etc.)? When and how can partnerships effectively contribute to capacity building and sustainable development?
  • What steps are necessary to ensure that all stakeholders, including the government, private sector and civil society can readily exchange information and experiences? How can "peer exchange" be established and nurtured?

 

Moderator's Message

Dear Colleagues,

A very warm welcome to Thematic Window II, “National Implementation”, of the 2016 ECOSOC e-discussion that will take place from 29 February to 25 March 2016. This e-discussion is a unique opportunity for the broader development community to provide critical policy guidance and recommendations for the 2016 ECOSOC session on “Implementing the 2030 Agenda: moving from commitments to results.”

2015 was a landmark year for development as UN Member States reached historic agreements that will guide development priorities for the coming years. Member States have committed to eradicate poverty, fight inequalities, build peaceful, inclusive and resilient societies, and secure the future of the planet and wellbeing of future generations. Now, in 2016 we begin implementation of the bold 2030 Agenda.

The 2030 Agenda calls for transformational change in every country. It will require ‘landing’ the global agenda at national and sub-national level, in according policies, programmes and budgets, to achieve the ambitious SDGs. This will be determined by national priorities and capacities—The UN Development System stands ready to assist countries in this endeavour. In doing so, it acknowledges the imperative of national ownership, with actions of support firmly determined by country needs and national capacities. UN efforts must be flexible to adapt to country contexts.

We strongly encourage participants to share concrete national, subnational or local experiences so as to effectively guide recommendations for implementation over the coming years. I look forward to a lively and rich discussion in the next few weeks!

Best regards,
Pedro Conceicao

Comments (366)

E-discussion Facilitator

Summary - Week 4 of the ECOSOC e-discussion on “Implementing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: National Implementation”

 

Thanks to all participants for your insightful contribution and active engagement throughout the final week of the e-discussion! To recap, please see below a summary of the key points.

 

1)    How can the SDGs be effectively mainstreamed into relevant national sustainable development policies and programmes, while preserving countries' policy space to pursue national priorities? How can the UN development system best support this?

  • Assessing national policies and programmes, vis-à-vis the 2030 Agenda is suggested, as the first step countries should take in the process of mainstreaming the SDGs at the national level.             
    • Efforts must be put in place to take stock of existing frameworks and policies that could be aligned with the SDGs.
    • For the assessment, countries could use the support of the UN development system and should take into account best practices and lessons learned from the ground (also from countries with similar experiences).
    • Outputs from the assessment would feed comprehensive discussions (involving all stakeholders for each goal) on national and sub-national policies and programmes Discussions should include the issues and priorities at the regional level and ought to emphasize the participation of youth and women.
    • In turn, the output of the discussions would support prioritization of SDGs, which will be localized at the local level.
    • The assessment of national policies and programs should also include a revision of national and sub-national legislation, which involves (among others): amendments to a number of existing laws that are critical to the actualization of this 'bold' ambition; passage of pending legislations that are aligned to this global agenda at the National and sub-national levels; consideration and enactment of new legislation to directly enable the implementation of the SDGs.
    • The UN could provide technical assistance to the assessment and planning process, which could be done by placing UN staff/experts within the national planning unit.
  • Localization of the SDGs: participants highlighted the need to further effective localization of the SDGs (translate the development agenda into results at the local level) in order for the 2030 Agenda to be successful. Defining the scope of localization and identifying which local levels need to be involved in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda; employing effective data analytics and performance management, including strong monitoring frameworks; ensuring adequate resources, coordination, mainstreaming of the SDGs in national and regional planning processes.
    • Localization should not be seen as a translation of global policies within local contexts, but rather as a way of establishing a coherent continuum, and as a process based on the empowerment of local stakeholders, through a territorial approach aimed at making sustainable development more responsive and therefore relevant to local needs, aspirations and lives.
    • The UN should support capacity assessment and advise countries on how to identify the types of abilities to build, which will depend on the context of each country. In any case, capacity building should focus on institutional effectiveness for local development once local authorities are the starting point for the success of SDG. Institutional efficiency models, in turn, must be based on satisfaction (results), participation and accountability.
    • Availability of data is necessary not only for planning but also for effective localization of the SDGs. However, given the large number of indicators, it seems difficult to many developing countries to monitor all the global indicators, let alone the other national indicators. Therefore, development partners must support the strengthening of institutions responsible for data gathering and analysis at the country level.
    • Along with localization, ownership must be fostered during the adoption of new national policy strategies and priorities that are in line with the 2030 Agenda. A global awareness campaign is needed on both the SDGs and on ownership.
    • For example, the UN in Belarus undertook a global best practice on rolling out and localizing the SDGs through the #UN70BelarusExpress, with a train travelling to every district of the country bringing together more than 150,000 participants from 40 countries including senior Government officials, parliamentarians, regional governors, 100 NGOs, 25 private sector partners, 30 embassies, students, journalists, religious leaders, representatives of vulnerable grounds and the SG’s Youth Envoy to Belarus conducting more than 250 activities in 8 days. The #UNBelarusExpress for SDGs resulted in an unprecedented visibility for the UN across Belarus. The UN developed a joint strategy to support the implementation of the 2030 Agenda following the success of the campaign, focusing on the 5 A- approach: 1) Analysis of the national policies in order to evaluate the level of integration of SDG targets and indicators, identify data gaps in terms of integration and create a mapping of ‘excluded’ targets and indicators; 2) Awareness building aimed at achieving a similar level of understanding of the SDGs among different stakeholders and the UN Agencies; 3) Advocacy on the new developed agenda targeted at donors, Governments and private sector through provision of evidence related to needs and efficient policies, as well as criteria of effective technical assistance; 4) Application of the analytical data to the National Development Strategy 2030, national and regional plans, the UNDAF, the new Country Programme Documents of UNDP, UNICEF, UNFPA; 5) Accountability to ensure that citizens and all the national stakeholders have access to relevant information; and can provide feedback and influence the process of SDG implementation, establishing a robust and transparent monitoring and reporting mechanism.
    • Practical tools already exist to assist localization work. For instance, joint UN work led to the elaboration of a Toolkit for localizing the SDGs, which supports local and regional governments (LRGs) and other local stakeholders to raise awareness and advocate for a more active role on part of local actors and enables coherence in decision making with the SDGs. The toolkit offers a variety of instruments and mechanisms that can facilitate the localization of the SDGs, while having a consistent but flexible approach to be adaptable to different contexts, including states in conflict.
    • Countries should also create bottom-up mechanisms to ensure the participation of grassroots, local, community organizations in the planning/implementation of the SDGs in order to guarantee ownership.
  • Guidelines and standards: participants suggest that the United Nations and its member states should develop guidelines for implementing the SDGs at the national and local level, which would help the mainstreaming process.
  • Establishing national leadership/focal points:
    • Participants suggested that national governments should appoint leaders/focal points responsible for mainstreaming and overseeing the 2030 Agenda internally. Leadership is essential to maximize the impact of policy interventions and their compliance with key national priorities in an agreed collective approach that can meet the specific needs of each country member.
    • The implementation of SDGs requires high-level leadership at the international level, role that should be played by the UN, as well as in regional organizations and within country member’s governments.
    • In countries where national development agencies exist, they could lead the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and also set up a platform for interaction/engagement by all different sectors and at all levels.
    • Countries could also create national SDG councils that join together members of the diverse levels of government, civil society, the UN and other major groups
  • Coordination among all intergovernmental agencies:
    • The UN and all related intergovernmental agencies should work in coordination to achieve the SDGs, including the WBG and the IMF.
    • As the SDGs overlap with existing initiatives, agreements and treaties, it would be more effective to link the goals/targets with those existing initiatives, agreements and treaties, as a way to coordinate action and bind progress on the 2030 Agenda.
  • Countries should adopt development-planning approaches, with the support of the UN development system.
    • Governments need to adapt the SDGs with an integrated, ‘whole of government,’ approach. The interlinked and indivisible nature of the SDGs necessitates inter- and intra-sectoral cooperation to develop comprehensive national strategies.
    • The UNDP worked with five member states (Albania, Indonesia, Rwanda, Tunisia and, the United Kingdom) to consider approaches to implement and monitor relevant national governance-related goals, with associated targets and indicators. The Pilot Initiative involved the following steps: collecting, identifying and prioritizing indicators (several types of indicators should be used to cross-check results towards a single target); localizing at the sub-national level, vis-à-vis universalization and harmonization of indicators (balancing specific and contextualized indicators that capture the richness of information at the national and sub-national levels, whilst still being internationally comparable and capable of being harmonized across countries); reconciling an emphasis on indicators with appropriate policies and processes that lead to change (link policies with practice and service delivery); working in partnership with multiple stakeholders (partnerships at all levels – through consultation in local communities, at the regional and provincial level, across government, and between government actors and stakeholders in oversight bodies, in civil society and the private sector – will be essential for progress on Goal 16).
    • Mali’s government, with the support of UNDP, used an theory of change based approach to mainstream the SDGs into national strategies and to help define priorities. The process included: establishing the relationships between the main priorities and the validated SDGs; identifying the cause-effect patterns between the various objectives; defining a strategy to guide the change in the selected SDGs.
  • Lessons learned:
    • The UN must identify member states that have had success in implementing the goals and targets and share their strategies and results.
    • The UN should also ask for companies and organizations throughout the World to submit their processes and techniques that accomplish Sustainable Development Goals, and create a “Directory” for the world to access. The UN could promote this directory to entice organizations and companies to participate in the “Directory” development.
    • Lessons learned in past and present multi-stakeholder partnerships should also be disseminated through international organizations.

 

2)    What are key areas for making progress on and building national and sub-national capacities for sustainable development, and how do they differ across country contexts (e.g. least developed countries, middle income countries, high-income countries, countries in situations of fragility etc.)? When and how can partnerships effectively contribute to capacity building and sustainable development?

 

  • Capacity building needs assessment:
    • Participants propose to use a system capacity development approach that interdependently strengthens individual capacities, organizational and institutional capacities, as well as the systemic capacities by working jointly with stakeholders in order to; (a) assess capacity needs and priorities (b) define and design appropriate capacity development interventions and (c) define meaningful results and track progress.
  • Monitoring and evaluation (M&E): participants believe that the first step in the process of improving monitoring of SDGs and/or national plan is to develop an M&E system. Many countries have developed national level M&E framework but they aren’t effective because they lack proper institutionalization in the government system.
  • Funding:
    • The effective implementation of the SDGs requires national plans and programmes to be backed up by adequate resources.
    • Due to the limited resources available for countries to follow the 2030 Agenda, perhaps it is necessary to choose/prioritize programmes and projects, which have higher coverage, impact and sustainability so that the selected ones have a higher payoff and impact.
    • Governments should also consider working in strong collaboration with the civil society sector. That is to provide non-competitive grants to civil society organizations (CSOs) recognized by the competent administrative authority. Such budget would assist CSOs in increasing capacities to reach their goals and also in extending their tentacles to secure other funding from other sources and create synergies and partnerships to implement the SDGs.
  • Developing preparedness and disaster management strategies is necessary for vulnerable countries to cope with humanitarian and environmental emergencies. Precautionary planning and prompt action are able to reinforce institutions while protecting natural resources at risk. Policies for promoting leadership approaches inspired to resilience and responsibility are the basis for responding to uncontrolled or unpredicted trends. In addition to this, setting up specialized staff for monitoring, prevention and emergency action is a way to do so, while at the same time creating new opportunities, inclusion and stability at the local level.
  • Data collection and analysis: participants highlighted that investment in capacity and systems is essential to strengthen the statistical and reporting systems to disaggregate data by age, gender and disability.
  • Poverty:
    • Stakeholders must acknowledge the role of poverty and absence of opportunities especially in education, agriculture and other economic activities and link these issues to the unfortunate perpetuation of early marriages and child brides.
    • The corporate world should take on a greater role in promoting the eradication of poverty and should avoid all unethical and inhumane activities that lead to abnormal growth and extreme poverty. The UN should take up the matter with the corporate world and with the much larger informal sector.
  • Role of the private sector:
    • Participants believe that governments must implement precautionary and sustainable development measures, to include requiring corporations and businesses to submit environmental impact assessments for licensing certifications and periodic reviews to ensure environmental protection. 
    • In Kyrgyzstan, the state, the private sector and public sector are seen as crucial stakeholders in implementing sustainable development. For an effective partnership, it is important to have clearly defined roles, goals and participation mechanisms. While in Kyrgyzstan the roles of the state and the private sector are much more developed than that of the public sector and their contribution to the SDGs more visible, the public sector still needs to define its vision and role in the national development, in addition to developing strong accountability mechanisms. 
    • Also, steps are necessary to protect the UN in general and the 2030 Agenda from undue influence and conflict of interest with regard to corporate involvement.
  • Civil society accountability: in many countries there is no mandatory civil society accountability. In order to ensure proper use of funding and build confidence, countries should create systems to measure the contribution and promote transparency of the civil society sector. Also, in some countries the civil society needs define its vision and role in the national development.
  • Engaged Youth: Several participants emphasized the importance of meaningfully engaging youth in the implementation of the SDGs and recommended a potential initiative to engage them training/coaching youth in leadership, planning, implementing and evaluating SDG-centered projects, ethics, community outreach, coalition building and teamwork, entrepreneurship and creativity and innovation (both social and economic/business). Youth engagement is extremely important and relevant due to the size of this age group. Additionally, they have relevant, innovative ideas and are impacted first hand by the 2030 Agenda. Participants recommend partnering with youth as agents of change, encouraging and involving them in decision making processes, promoting them.

 

3) What steps are necessary to ensure that all stakeholders, including the government, private sector and civil society can readily exchange information and experiences? How can "peer exchange" be established and nurtured?

 

  • Existing local networks:
    • Participants suggested that governments and stakeholders must take advantage of existing local networks (e.g. local government associations, civil society networks, etc.) to channel peer exchange on SDGs implementation. Those networks often possess experience in peer-learning methodologies that can be readily put to use.
  • Multi-stakeholders partnerships:
    • The design of multi-stakeholder partnerships and governance frameworks can contribute to the exchange of information and peer learning.
    • Meaningful and effective stakeholder engagement that includes exchange of information and sharing of experiences is crucial to effectively mainstream the SDGs. This can be operationalized through the establishment of institutionalized multi-stakeholder spaces for dialogue where multiple stakeholders can incorporate their perspective in the design, implementation and review of national-level development policies and plans for the 2030 Agenda.
    • In the Netherlands, a “Global Goals Charter” was created as a result of a multi-stakeholder initiative, which was signed by over 70 Dutch organizations. The charter was already set up before the adoption of the SDGs and aims at developing and strengthening multi stakeholder partnerships for specific SDGs.
  • Public-private partnerships: participants recommend the creation of associations composed by both public and private members – including local and regional administrations. This particular structure provides organizations with precious insights on the processes that link commitments to actions, and actions to results, within public institutions and partners.
  • New technologies and collaboration/cooperation platforms:
    • Participants, once again, stress the role of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in providing means for stakeholder engagement, but also highlight that collaboration platforms can also be created without the use of ICTs.
    • Institutionalized dialogue and sharing platforms, with or without ICTs, should be intended as a tool for supporting participation and also capacity development processes in which knowledge is transformed into skills that are, in turn, converted into actions.
    • Stakeholders should organize forums; utilizing new media like social media as well as traditional media to facilitate peer exchanges.
    • Participants asserted that libraries are proven, cost-effective partners for advancing development priorities, and that libraries are already making an active contribution to development planning in many countries. Therefore, countries should ensure that libraries, as institutions providing access to information and ICTs, are represented in national development plans. International Federation  of Library Associations created a toolkit to help libraries and library associations to understand the 2030 Agenda and bring themselves into a relevant conversation with their national agencies.
    • Stakeholders could also make use of “big data” to locate interesting or surprising patterns, social, technological and institutional, such as emerging trends of either “things working” or “things failing”. This information should be disseminated through, for instance, “knowledge extension service” in every region (i.e. mobile libraries, connecting local groups with knowledge resources) or other kinds of innovations.
    • In the Netherlands, a broad consortium of public and private parties was established and is working together to develop a Dutch global goals website that brings together all Dutch initiatives and news on the SDGs. Besides a website, they are also organizing a series of public debates to raise awareness on the SDGs.
    • Open-source online resource for everyone to use, such as the “Roadmap for Habitat III”, developed by the Ecological Sequestration Trust, from England, should be offered and disseminated among stakeholders to foster the exchange of knowledge and experiences.
    • All stakeholders should have a defined and active role, placing emphasis in ownership and engagement, making them all feels part of the implementation and revision process.
    • For partnerships to foster sustainable development, both a clear framework for cooperation and an enabling environment for operation of each of the parties are necessary.
    • Mechanisms should be adopted at the national level to encourage not only stakeholder’s participation, but also citizen participation in revision and follow-up processes of the 2030 Agenda.
  • Transparency and accountability:
    • A transparent and accountable system should to be put in place, which will drastically increase the implementation capacity of the nation states and avoid opportunities for misuse and mismanagement and work towards empowering the communities and stakeholders.
    • The system could also be web based with sufficient mechanisms to allow rural communities to access at the district (lowest administrative units) level, considering that Internet penetration rates are extremely low in many countries. 
Lanre Rotimi (not verified)

Dear e-Discussion Facilitator from Brazil,

Thanks for Week 4 Summary. It has captured many of the good ideas and pertinent suggestions geberated in this Global Discussion. However there are Gaps arising from editing out some good ideas and pertinenet suggestions that need to be filled, if the Development Impact and Development Effectiveness of the SG Report on e-Discussion 2016 is to be optimized. Please note that the Acid Test of Credibility of the SG Report on e-Discussion 2016 is How it delivers:-

1. Better National and Global Collective Action for Village to Global Sustainable Development.

2. Better UNO, WBG and IMF - UN System Delivering as One, DaO Driving Village to Global Sustainable Development

3. Better Trade, Aid, Debts and Taxes in each of 306/193 UN Member States

4. Better War on Poverty, Hunger, Disease and Environmental Degradation, PHDE and War on Terrorism, Insurgency, Slavery and Corruption, TISC in each of 306/193 UN Member States

The Gaps we have identified in the Week 4 Summary are:-

1. No Clear Statement on One Worldwide Approach. There is mention of "Territorial Approach" and "Whole of Government Approach" that are components of "One Worldwide Approach". This Clear Statement needs to be made.

2. Coordination and Cooperation specifically mentioned. However Coordiantion and Cooperation cannot stand alone without being complemented by Collaboration and Cohesion. This underlines need for clear Framework on Cooperation, Collaboration, Cohesion and Coordiantion as One from Village to Global levels.

3. WBG and IMF mentioned in passing. There is Central Role for UNO, WBG and IMF Individually and collectively as 3 Member UN System in the work towards achieveing the Global Goals. Each of these 3 UN System Members need to be Reformed if a UN System Fit for the 21st Century is to emerge. Without a UN System Fit for the 21st Century work towards achieving Global Goals may be excercise in futility. These Reforms could start from Re-establishing existing UN CEB Committees and Establishing New UN CEB Committees as suggested by a participant.

4. Building Bridge between Lessons Learning and Lessons Forgetting editted out. Points made on Lessons Learning will be more potent if this point is underlined.

5. Policy Makers and Decision Makers on 306/193 UN Member States, UN System (UNO, WBG and IMF), MGoS Member CSOs/NGOs and Non MGoS Member CSOs/NGOs sides Mustering Political Will required to achieve Global Goals edited out. Points made on National Leaders and Focal Points will be more potent if this point is underlined.

6.  306/193 UN Member States are looking up to UN System - UNO, WBG and IMF to help them achieve National Goals aligned and harmonized with Global Goals. This point was subtly made. However, for Best Results it needs to be clearly made. In making the point clearly, the additional point also needs to be made that the UN System - UNO, WBG and IMF Individually and Collectively need help, if they are to provide the type of help that the 306/193 UN Member States need. This underlines need to fill all identified Gaps in Week 4 Summary.

7. Specific Action Steps that aid uniform utilization of the SG Report on e-Discussion 2016 Recommendations by all concerned stakeholders on UN Member States, UN System - UNO, WBG and IMF and Citizens sides need to be clearly stated. A participant made some suggestions in concluding remarks on the last day - 25 March 21016 including: a) Selecting One Worldwide Approach b) Selecting Global Coordianting Internal and External Consultants etc. Clear Recommendations that make the SG Report on e-Discussion 2016 effective Vision and Words with ACTION Document needs to be made. Without such clear Recommendations the SG Report on e-Discussion 2016 will be impotent as it will continue with Business as Usual. If this point is underlined the SG Report will be potent as it kick starts Business Unusual.

It is our hope that identified Gaps in Week 4 Summary will be filled and that the First Draft SG Report on e-Discussion 2016 will be "All Inclusive, All Embracing and Ambitious" Document that help achieve increasing convergence between Global Goals - revised AAAA, SDG, COP21 Outcome, Agenda 21 Vision Intention and Reality in each of the 306/193 UN Member States.

We do look forward to making contribution to help improve Draft(s) of SG Report on e-Discussion 2016 when it is ready. We pray the Implementation as well as the Monitoring and Evaluation of the Implementation of the Final SG Report on e-Discussion 2016 in 6 UN Official Languages will mark Turning Point in World Sustainable Development.

Best wishes,

Pradeep Mahapatra

The time  has come to  have a concerted action undertake broad based partnership to work together by garnering collective and shared responsibility to minimize the adverse impact of distress migration, degradation and climate chaos , livelihoods issues keeping water & biodiversity  and community reslience in fore front & first. At the same time, create a broad based canopy and canvas to accelerate to rejuvenate the resource base, the capability of vulnerable/ultra poor communities to enhance bargaining ability, skill up gradation  with regard to Eco-entrepreneurships and minimizing health hazards and conservation of resources: thus  it needs following areas: provisioning inputs & knowledge base, protecting resource base, promoting skills , entrepreneurships, technology  transformation & risk transfer

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment! Great point about the importance of partnerships in sustainable development in regards to environmental protection. Based on your experience working on climate change in India, with whom and how can partnerships and peer exchanges be established and nurtured to best achieve the solutions you offered (ie 'provisioning inputs and knowledge base; protecting resource base; promoting skills; entrepreneurship; technology transformation and risk transfer')? 

Tina Cornely • Founder & CEO at Bridging Humanity from United States

For my projects, partnerships for sustainable development go hand in hand with environmental protection. Let me explain. Through my volunteer based NGO I travel the globe and teach impoverished people my 9 Steps to Eradicate Poverty (harvest & purify water, eat balanced meals, make home made soap, make dry compost toilets, alternative medicine, family planning, eco refrigerator, harness solar energy & repurpose trash into art/useful things so they can earn a living. This platform has been tested & works but what ensures a successful implementation, outcome & followup is having strategic partnerships on the ground in the countries I visit. For example, in Borneo I partner with the World WildLife Fund. In Nepal I partner with the Nepal Youth Foundation and Maiti Nepal. The Nepal Youth Foundation is an NGO that specializes in treating malnourishied people & kids via outreach camps in remote areas. Maiti Nepal is an NGO that focuses on human trafficking & also conducts remote outreach.  By partnering with key well respected local NGOs & conducting train the trainer classes, I am able to maintain my program & reach a wider audience. In summary, have a solid plan that ties in with teaching self sufficiency, SDG & environmentalism and create lasting meaningful partnerships with entities that are already conducting outreach in their respective areas.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for sharing concrete examples as to how partnerships between well respected organizations with aligning missions can bring about meaningful change!

Sushanta De • Secretary at The Young Explorers\' Institute for Social Service from India

The population of the youths in India is the higest in the world. They ar vibrant,logical and practical in their action. They required some resources where they can explain their thought in their own language. Keeping in this mind our  civil society planned for a series of programmes such as competitions at Kolkata to be held at State Central Library of Government of West Bengal. The details are available at https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/05Z1RB

This society planned to donate books to 39 Higher Secondary & Secondary Schools in West Bengal. At least 39000 students will be benifited out of that.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment! Great to hear of an initiative that will donate books to higher and secondary schools in West Bangal, this is certainly a step to ensure youth populations, both men and women, achieve literacy- relating to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 4 on quality education. How do you or your organization, 'The Young Explorers' Institute for Social Services' see a way to mainstream SDG 4 on quality education targets into national sustainable development policies and programmes? How can the UN development system best support those efforts?

Henry Nnadozie Ekwuruke • Executive Director and Chief Consultant at Development Generation Africa International from Nigeria

What should we convert from? Aren't we basically good people and a great nation? Unfortunately, each of us (the youth, women and the elders - the strength, future and wisdom of Nigeria), each of us very much resembles that tree that, over many years has repeatedly shown that it's sterile and under-produces. We are tired of no progress! The SDGs presents a new opportunity and we cherish it. We demand for change from within to achieve the SDGs in Nigeria. Thanks to our new leadership, however, it must bear fruits for now and the future utilizing its valid experience!

 

The Youth in Nigeria demand for change. Change we have got - it is now time to move from commitments to results, we have Amina Mohammed on the ground. "Failure is not in our dictionary - 2016 and beyond!" - Executive Assistant @thedgai, Miss Pleasure Ariwodo said. Thank you

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment, Henry. You mentioned that Nigeria's youth demand change and that you have new leadership in your country. What do you think is the role of the youth and this new leadership in advocating the SDGs in Nigeria?

Henry Nnadozie Ekwuruke • Executive Director and Chief Consultant at Development Generation Africa International from Nigeria

A key challenge facing Nigeria is to sustain the growth needed to create jobs and reduce poverty, improving well-being in the short and long term for all, particularly women. Agenda 2063 and the SDGs agree! They need to make the agreement evolve by putting women and women's rights to equality and economic future on the national agenda, stepping it up with concrete action. I advocate more education and priority for skills for more women to empower them for prosperity because the cost of low performance by women in Nigeria, particularly North Eastern Nigeria, will be the equivalent of a permanent economic recession under prevailing circumstances! Security have improved but much more still need to be done.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment, Henry. Other participants in the forum also emphasized the importance of gender equality to sustainable development. Perhaps you could engage with them further to discuss other suggestions on how to ensure an equitable and inclusive implementation of the SDGs into national contexts? For instance, a representative from the Training for Women Network shares the following:

Training for Women NetworkWed, March 2, 2016 at 12.05 pm

Dear all, thank you all for all the valuable comments, I found this E-discussion form to be effective means for cross learning and sharing. I would like to build on all what has been said fostering strong partnership, sustaining the gains and capacity building to nurture resilience society.

 

As the UK Government has acknowledged in its report ‘The UK’s contribution to achieving the Millennium Development Goals’ (2005) “The goal of gender equality and the empowerment of women is a cross-cutting issue relevant to the achievement of all MDGs” (pg. 28)

 

 

Science, technology and innovation can be a tool with which to accelerate the achievement of the internationally agreed development goals, including the Millennium Development Goals.  Technology can, for instance, facilitate efforts to eradicate poverty, achieve food security, fight diseases, improve education and respond to the challenges of climate change.  Women entering paid employment in science, technology and innovation is a strong indicator of their integration into the market economy.  As women benefit from more regular income, they are more likely to achieve greater autonomy, self-reliance in the household and in their personal development, and decision-making power.

 

 

It is widely acknowledged that women remain the largest under-represented group when it comes to enterprise and innovation Northern Ireland is far below the EU figure for women’s entrepreneurial activity.  Women represent a huge pool of untapped potential and diversity and are an incubator for greater creativity and innovation.  Moreover, in sufficient numbers women will attract other women like magnets and bring cultural change.  The Economist magazine suggested that women are the single biggest and least acknowledged force for economic growth on the planet who have contributed more to the expansion of the world economy than either new technology or the emerging markets of China and India.

 

 

A time of economic challenge presents an opportunity to the brave to take a different approach and build a different economic model.  The women led Audur Capital in Iceland, whose directors warned against the excessive risk taking by financial institutions, heed two global trends: (1) The growing body of research that demonstrates that companies owned or managed by women yield a higher long term return; and (2) The growth opportunities in businesses that embrace values that enable them to turn social, ethical and environmental responsibility to their business advantage.

 

 

Childcare and employment should be explicitly linked.  Childcare for employment should be the framework for any childcare strategy inside which provision for children’s education and health should sit.  Governments should commit to work towards the goal of universal good quality, accessible and affordable childcare for all children up to the age of fourteen.  This is recommended in the CEDAW Concluding observations on the seventh periodic report of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (para 49).

 

 

Increasing the participation of girls in education means: the abolition of fees; adequate public resourcing of direct and indirect costs of schooling for the poorest households; appropriate budget allocations between primary, secondary and tertiary education; strengthened capacity at all levels of the education system to develop and deliver gender responsive education policies; and improved quality of education.

 

 

According to the International Labour Organisation, the gap between men and women in the scientific and technological fields is linked to pervasive gender roles and attitudes in different societies – visible in both developed and developing countries – which encourage girls to pursue ‘softer’ subjects.  In the UK there remains a persistence of traditional attitudes and stereotypes surrounding the educational pathways of women and girls.  This is particularly prevalent in the under-representation of women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics subjects which has a direct impact on not only the gender pay gap but in providing role models to encourage future women and girls in these subjects as mentioned in reports from the Commission on the Status of Women’s (CSW) 55th Session.  

(http://daccess-dds-ny.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/N10/686/79/PDF/N1068679.pdf?OpenElement.)

 

 

Associated with this, the UN Millennium Development Goals Report 2013 (http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/pdf/report-2013/mdg-report-2013-english.pdf) states that “the data suggest that women in developing regions are more likely than men to work as contributing family workers-on farms…” (Pg. 21) compared to the industries associated with science, technology and innovation where there are better prospects and security/social benefits.

 

 

Further work is needed to tackle the continued discrimination which makes it harder for women to enter formal employment and harder for them to stay employed.  Despite recommendations from the CEDAW Committee in 1999, 2008 and 2013, there is still no unified national strategy to implement CEDAW in the UK, its Overseas Territories and areas of work covered by its International Development work.  Training for Women Network are concerned that there may not be sufficiently developed commitment and leadership, co-ordination of strategies, and systematic monitoring of outcomes to ensure that CEDAW obligations are implemented, and these geographical inconsistencies could hamper overall progress on the realisation of rights guaranteed by CEDAW which would have a negative impact in achieving the indicators marking Millennium Development Goals progress.  There may be laws to address equality and human rights but they do not always include specific information prohibiting discrimination against women.

 

 

In 2008 the Conclusion of the International Labour Organisation’s International Labour Conference on Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development, emphasized that: “Training policies and programmes that aim to improve productivity and employability (…) need to ensure equality of opportunity, be free from discrimination and take into account family and household obligations. (…) A life-cycle approach has to be adopted to overcoming the challenges that confront women in gaining access to education and training and in utilizing this training to secure better employment. This includes: improving the access of girls to basic education; overcoming logistical, economic and cultural barriers to apprenticeships and to secondary and vocational training for young women – especially in non-traditional occupations; taking into account women’s home and care responsibilities when scheduling workplace-based learning and entrepreneurship training; and meeting the training needs of women re-entering the labour market and of older women who have not had equal access to opportunities for lifelong learning”.  These recommendations are essential in the achieving of many of the indicators associated with the Millennium Development Goals.

 

 

Women’s participation in political decision-making is constrained by prejudice, caring responsibilities, lack of family support mechanisms and unfriendly hours and conditions.  These wider ranging issues will need to be addressed if the goal of empowering women is to be met.  This is echoed in the CEDAW Concluding observations on the seventh periodic report of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland when it states “The Committee further recalls its previous concluding observations (A/63/38, paras. 284 and 285) and remains concerned at the low representation of women in the post-conflict process in Northern Ireland and the failure to fully implement Security Council Resolution 1325 (2000)” (para 43).

Kenyatta ROBERTS-KROMAH • Logistics/Travel Support -New Deal, BPPS at UNDP

The impact of the  civil unrest in Liberia continues to affect development initiatives, among the many institutions affected, worse hit is  Liberia's health care system. The Health care in Liberia remains in a deplorable state and  lacks the capacity to deliver clean and basic health services to its citizens. This was made evident by the recent outbreak of the Ebola pandemic which claimed about 3000 lives. This situation has left a major social and economic impact on a country who is still struggling to make significant development strives. Unless there is an urgent effort by the international community to improve health care facilities and build the capacity of health care workers, preventable diseases will continue to penetrate and claim more lives thus affecting sustainable development.     

 

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment! The Ebola virus disease (EVD) epidemic that hit Western African states exposed the need for resilient health care systems. Ebola hit hard Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia, but when one looks at Nigeria and Senegal they were able to bring EVD under control in a very short time. Why were some countries better able to mitigate faster than others, what does the differences show us about what needs to be built on sub-national levels and capacities? What role can partnerships play in contributing to capacity building and sustainable development of health systems? 

Patricia Almeida Ashley • Associate Professor at Universidade Federal Fluminense from Brazil

For the question "How can the SDGs be effectively mainstreamed into relevant national sustainable development policies and programmes, while preserving countries' policy space to pursue national priorities? How can the UN development system best support this?"

Firstly - public policy planning tools, UN and country-members to identify policy non communication of global Agenda 2030 goals and targets as a source for national policy planning documents, as the Pluriannual Plans of country-members.  See attached a case study of detachment of Agenda 21 from governmental planning and budgeting;

Secondly - legal frameworks, UN and country-members to identify legal frameworks outdated in concept or uncoherent with principles, goals and means of implementation, requiring a database on legislation at national and subnational levels on coherent and uncoherent frameworks or new proposals;

Thirdly - sharing national experiences at regional and global levels, with a global database of national sustainable development strategy and means of implementation;

Fourthly - information and communication technology for participatory monitoring and accountability, to support all above with open free and easy transparent platform of country by country national plans, budgets year by year, as well as subnational arrangements for integration of global, national and subnational plans.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. You mentioned sharing experiences and participatory monitoring and accountability as means to ensure mainstreaming the SDGs into national sustainable development policies. Can you tell us more about your experience on how to involve all stakeholders in the exchange information and experiences?

Noor (not verified)

SDGs are really well directed for development, however, implementation in case of my country (Pakistan) seems next to impossible. Here policies are developed lots of public money is used on that but the implementation has not taken place. We could not meet the MDGs targets and with present indifferent politicians, selfish and non professional civilian and military bureaucracy cannot do anything but can fail the efforts and make things worse so that external funding must be continued and their bank accounts keep going high and high. I am very much worried that the way government is handling the things the targets of SDG 4 will not be achieved. On the other hand the mushroom growth of NGOs in Pakistan have also their own ways, they say, write and report very good but what they do is very different. As far as education is concerned , there are lots of villages, towns and localities in Pakistan where there are no schools at all and there is 100% illiteracy, however, to fight illiteracy and the government agencies and NGOs are opening more and more schools in the same areas where schools are already functioning. same children are enrolled in 2 to 3 schools just to play the number game and earn money. I am sure this is neither their ignorance nor innocence but they ultimate agenda is not education but they have other bearings. I know the UNDP or other bodies of UN work in collaboration with government and many times with some NGOs, but by doing so the impact will be very thin. I suggest to find out the ways where the UN itself should take more responsibility at least in the sates where the governments are irresponsible and take ill-informed decisions.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for you comment. In your opinion, what would be the key areas for making progress on and building national and sub-national capacities for sustainable development in your country?

E-discussion Facilitator

Hi Noor, thank you for your comment. Many participants in this discussion also believe that corruption is a significant challenge to effectively mainstreaming the SDGs in national sustainable development policies in low, middle and high-income countries alike. Perhaps you can engage with them further to discuss other ideas on how effectively mainstream SDGs into national sustainable development policies and programmes? Akaash for instance, shares the following ideas:

 

Akaash Maharaj GOPAC Chief Executive from CanadaThu, March 3, 2016 at 03.26 am

GOPAC -- the Global Organization of Parliamentarians Against Corruption -- strongly supports the Sustainable Development Goals, and believes that Goal 16 in particular correctly identifies the imperative for the nations of the world to combat corruption, as a critical means of achieving social and economic development.The UN Development Programme has estimated that the developing world loses €10 to corruption for every €1 it receives in official aid.  Moreover, GOPAC estimates that corruption now kills more people across the world than war and famine combined. No matter what else the international community may do, we will simply not achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, unless we are able to significantly contain and reduce corruption in public institutions.GOPAC’s research has demonstrated conclusively that – across all regions, political systems, and cultures – strong parliaments are unambiguously correlated with reduced corruption, while weak parliaments are correlated with increased corruption.

By the very nature of their role, parliamentarians are the watchdogs of democracy, and it is tragic when citizens come accept their watchdogs muting their bark, muzzling their bite, or being neutered by the very powers they are meant to hold at bay.  Ultimately, effective parliamentary oversight is the single most effective component in the state system to discourage, detect, and defeat corruption.Our call is, therefore, simple to articulate, though often difficult to realise: to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, combatting corruption in public administration must be our first priority, and to succeed in that effort, we must cultivate and empower a vigilant, relentless, and fearless community of parliamentarians, to stand between our leaders and the levers of power.

 

Naglaa ARAFA • Programme Specialist at UNDP

In Egypt, the Government recently launched the it Vision 2030 and have have established a national committee to follow-up on the implementation of the SDGs.  Would appreciate your views on  how to suopport  the government in this process; ( development  of national action plan; awareness raising; advocacy; monitoring and evaluiation; capacity building for statisitical office; developmen of indicators etc.  What are the lessons learned from working with the MDGs? 

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your contribution! In what regards lessons learned from working with the MDGs and also national implementation of the SDGs, you could check the following publications:

World Economic and Social Survey 2014/2015 - MDG Lessons for Post-2015https://wess.un.org

Delivering the Post-2015 Development Agenda www.undp.org/content/undp/en/home/librarypage/mdg/delivering-the-post-2…

The Millennium Development Goals Report 2015 www.undp.org/content/undp/en/home/librarypage/mdg/the-millennium-develo…

Review of the contributions ofthe MDG Agenda to foster development: Lessons for the post-2015 UN development agenda (Discussion Note) www.un.org/millenniumgoals/pdf/mdg_assessment_Aug.pdf

Mainstreaming the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development - Interim Reference Guide to UN Country Teamshttp://www.undp.org/content/undp/en/home/librarypage/sustainable-develo…

Dr. Abdalatif Hassan • Economic Analyst at UNDP from Sudan

Abdalatif Hassan

Most of developing countries (Africa in particular) are politically instable with tribal conflicts and civil wars that resulted in IDP and refugees. Consequently, the bulk of the international aid in these countries is in a humanitarian nature which could hinder the achievement of the second goal of SDG for these developing countries. In my home country (Sudan), according to the  results of the 2015 Multiple Cluster Survey (MICS 2015), and despite the good progress in some indicators, Sudan will not meet the targets of the MDGs and there are some Key challenging issues are such as Decrease in measles immunization coverage and high prevalence of diarrhea (Khartoum State has the highest diarrhea prevalence: more than 2 in 5 children), stagnant improvement in malnutrition, Limited use of both improved water sources and improved sanitation, out of school children, Prevalence of violence against children, orphans, FGM among women, and early marriage and child mortality.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for you comment. The 2030 Agenda recognizes that countries in situations of conflict and post-conflict countries deserve special attention in implementing the SDGs. As stated in the General Assembly Resolution that adopted the 2030 Agenda: "We must redouble our efforts to resolve or prevent conflict and to support post-conflict countries, including through ensuring that women have a role in peace-building and state-building" (A/RES/70/1 - Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development). Considering your experience, how do you think partnerships can effectively contribute to capacity building and sustainable development in conflict and post-conflict countries? How do you think the UN development system can contribute to achieving the SDGs in realities such as the one you describe for your country?

Rogers DHLIWAYO • Economics Advisor at UNDP

The United Republic of Tanzania is among the various countries now strategizing and working on devising the best effective ways to localize and implement the 2030 Agenda.  In Tanzania, efforts will be made to localize agenda 2013 by strategically mainstreaming the SDGs into national and local plans. 

 

The SDGs are coming into force at an opportune time coinciding with key medium term national planning activities, and this provides room for SDGs to be mainstreamed into national and local plans. In Mainland Tanzania, the Government is in the process of formulating the Second Five Year Development Plan 2016/17-2020/21 (FYDP II). The forthcoming plan which has the theme “Nurturing Industrialization for Economic Transformation and Human Development” will come into effect in July 2016. In Zanzibar, the Revolutionary Government of Zanzibar is also formulating the successor development strategy to MKUZA II which is anchored on structural transformation for human development.

 

The SDGs are therefore pertinent to the country’s development aspirations and should be mainstreamed in these development frameworks and the same applies to the unfinished business of the MDGs. It is therefore pertinent that the UN support this mainstreaming process including gap analysis of the data requirements that will be needed for monitoring progress on the SDGs. This support should entail going through the development frameworks and scrutinizing the 17 SDGs and associated 169 targets with a view to

 

(a)   Delineating potential high impact interventions in terms of having potential to producing the intended structural transformation with human development outcomes;

(b)   Delineating interventions with potential to have high  impact in realising multiple goals and targets,

(c)    Devising ways to appropriately and strategically prioritize as well as sequence interventions pertaining to SDGs into the development frameworks

(d)   Mainstreaming the SDGs in local and sectoral plans and budgets

(e)     Strengthening M&E systems and evidence based policy making

(f)     Suggesting coordinating institutional arrangements for SDGs implementation and monitoring

(g)   Suggesting alternative financing mechanisms of the SDGs

(h)   Scaling up some successful MAF interventions on MDG 1

 

See also link to the Localization of the Post 2015 Agenda in Tanzania Report below

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/21215576/Localizing%20P2015/Consultations%20Report%20on%20Localising%20the%20Post%202015%20Development%20Agenda%20in%20Tanzania%2018%207%202014.pdf

 

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/21215576/Localizing%20P2015/Consultations%20Report%20on%20Localising%20the%20Post%202015%20Development%20Agenda%20in%20Tanzania%2018%207%202014.doc

E-discussion Facilitator

 Thank you for your comment. Can you tell us more about the role of national/local partnerships (government, private sector and civil society) in elaborating the medium term national planning activities you mentioned? How do you think partnerships can contribute to foster capacity building for sustainable development?

E-discussion Facilitator

Hi Rogers, thank you again for your comment. Other participants in the forum also recommended embedding the SDGs in national and local plans. Perhaps you could engage with them to discuss other suggestions on how the SDGs could be effectively mainstreamed into relevant national sustainable development policies and programmes? Amarakoon, for instance, shares the following concrete suggestions:

 

Amarakoon Bandara AMARAKOON Economic Advisor, UNDP from ZimbabweThu, March 10, 2016 at 01.17 pm

As most development policies are implemented through national development plans, it is logical to mainstream SDGs through such plans and strategies. When the national development plans are already in place, an entry point could be annual work plans that are used as tools for the implementation of long term plans. UN could support this in two ways: first is to assist the governments in the design of such plans and strategies that are aligned to achieve SDGs in the long run. Secondly, UN could align its development assistance strategy, UNDAF, to achieve SDGs. Our experience suggest the need for improvement in the delivery of UNDAF outcomes in a more collaborative manner for better results even in countries where Delivering as One is operational. Such an approach not only enhance synergies among UN agencies but also avoid duplication for greater value for money. It is also important to ensure that national efforts to achieve SDGs are linked to the national budgetary process for greater development outcomes. Engagement with Parliamentarians on SDGs through outreach and support to the establishment of Parliamentary Committees on SDGs could help in this regard. In Zimbabwe, UNDP has supported the government in preparing a Zimbabwe Position Paper on SDGs that is linked to the national development plan and the Ten Point Plan of the President. An Acceleration Action Plan for SDG 2 has also been drafted in consultation with provincial level officials. A dialogue with Parliamentarians is planned for raising awareness on the role of Parliamentarians in advancing the SDG implementation process, how they could champion SDGs at the national level and taking SDGs to their respective constituencies.

The micro level implementation of national development policies and strategies will involve sub-national entities. Yet, in most developing countries such sub-national institutional arrangements are weak to undertake broader development initiatives such as the SDGs. Strengthening capacities for Sub-national planning and implementation would help deliver results on the ground. Building strong partnerships and collaboration with local authorities, especially when resource flows from the center to the local bodies are very limited, would be critical to make a difference in development outcomes. These partnerships could be more effective if it starts right from the beginning. Given the stronger role expected from the non-governmental sector in achieving SDGs, it is paramount to strengthen the partnership with all stakeholders, including donors, the private sector and the civil society.

Most countries are members of regional blocks, typically targeting cooperation towards strengthened economic development. This could be a window for peer exchange. An initiative to get regional blocks to discuss how they should cooperate to achieve the SDGs would allow them to explore such exchange. This is in fact nothing but part of a South-South/Triangular cooperation. We have seen an increase in SS/TC with positive effects on development in developing countries at low cost, but they tend to be isolated and negligible compared to the needs, especially in Africa. Although the UN provides support in promoting SS/TC, its focus is narrow moving away from central themes- trade and investment- where the majority of SS/TC opportunities exist. Expanding the scope of the SS/TC support mechanisms could be an attractive proposition for all stakeholders, more so for developing countries lagging behind in trade and investment.

Dr. Abdalatif Hassan • Economic Analyst at UNDP from Sudan

Since 65% of the population in Sudan lives in rural agricultural areas which are mostly rain feed, the country should make big strides in countering Climate Change, otherwise people livelihood will be negatively affected and Sudan will not be able to meet the goals of the SDGs.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment! You mentioned that climate action and rural sector development are important for achieving sustainable and inclusive development in Sudan. How do you think partnerships can foster capacity building in Sudan and what kinds of partnerships would be most effective there?

Alamgir HOSSAIN • Programme Analyst at UNDP

Successful implementation of the SDGs will primarily depend on how the national governments and their various institutions at national, sub-national and local level best integrate the SDG goals and targets based on the country's national priorities. Many of the developing countries face challanges associated with such integration. Systemic, institutional and individual capacties for the governments will be key to internalize the SDGs into country's different tiers of development planning. As it was envisioned that most of the resources required for acheivement of the SDG targets will come from country's internal resources, internal planning and budgeting becomes the most imporant issue to be supported by development partners.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. In your view, what would be the role of the UN system in supporting the "internal planning and budgeting" you identified as the most important issues to be supported by development partners?

Mamadou Lamine (not verified)

We believe that in implementing it’s essential now that the United Nations continue to encourage governments to enhance and mobilize the customary or religious community leaders and other opinion leaders to appropriate the SDGs and contribute to public awareness so that they understand and take ownership. Community mobilization seems to be the key to the success of the implementation and achievement of SDGs.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. In your experience, what can be done by national/local governments to ensure the mobilization of community and private sector leaders around the 2030 Agenda?

Yelfigne Abegaz • national programme coordinator at UNWomen

Dear all, thank you all for all the valuable comments, I found this E-discussion form to be effective means for cross learning and sharing. I would like to build on all what has been said fostering strong partnership, sustaining the gains and capacity building to nurture resilience society.

My comments is on the first question “How can the SDGs be effectively mainstreamed into relevant national sustainable development policies and programmes, while preserving countries' policy space to pursue national priorities? How can the UN development system best support this?

In order to effectively mainstream the SDGs into relevant national sustainable development policies and programme while preserving countries policy space to pursue national priorities, it is important to build the capacity of National gov’t to lead and drive the sustainable development agenda and synergize. It is important that they own and be ready to do whatever it may cost to sustain the gains. In order to do that the UN development system have to invest  a lot in building the capacity of national govt and Non govt actors to have strong data base and a well-functioning system . Having baseline and indicators will allow to measure progress against set target which need to be documented and communicated widely.

In Ethiopia for instance, national policies show strong commitment to promote gender equality, there is still unavailability of data on gender indicators, especially to inform macroeconomic planning, resource allocation and policies. Quantitative data which provide concrete evidence on gender relations in terms of gender roles, access to and control over resources as well as time use are essential for the development of appropriate and effective economic and social policies at a national, as well as regional levels are not consistently collected and analyzed. While there have been several household surveys conducted in recent years, often useful in understanding the overall gender disparity in Ethiopia, the data have often not been systematically utilized to inform public policy.  Further, data generated through household surveys are limited to capturing regional/national realities while interventions are planned and targeted at lower administrative .This implies that there is a dire need for systems of sex disaggregated and analyzed data at all levels .

Hence, UN Women in Ethiopia is working  closely with the Ministry of Women and Children Affairs to have “ Quality, comparable, regular and accessible gender statistics are available to address national data gaps and meet policy and  reporting commitments under the GTP ,sectorial plans and policies, CEDAW SDGs “ aligned to our national development framework called “ Growth and Transformation Plan (GTP) . Please share  tools and experinces if there are simialr initiatves else where .

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. Access to reliable data for policy and program development is important to effectively implement SDGs in national contexts. Can you tell us more about the role of national/local partnerships (government, private sector and civil society) in Ethiopia in building knowledge networks? How can "peer exchange" be established and maintained over the long term?

E-discussion Facilitator

Other participants in the forum also emphasized the importance of using reliable data for policy and program development to effectively implement SDGs in national contexts. Perhaps you could engage with them further to discuss other suggestions on how to effectively mainstream the SDGs into national sustainable development policies and programmes? Ramit, for instance, shares the following:

 

Not affiliated to any organizationWed, March 9, 2016 at 10.22 am

 

For successful national implementation, there has to be successful and robust local level implementation. This will call for National and Provincial Governments to devolve appropriate resources, manpower and authority to the decentralized local governments at the rural, semi-rural and urban areas as is mandated by either the Constitution or an Act of Parliament.

Local Governments are elected by the local population and hence should be made to fulfill the mandate of the later for which the former need to be adequately empowered. Many countries despite of having a decentralized system of governance apart from a Federal structure shy away from devolving powers to the local bodies and stop short of issuing clear cut guidelines and orders regarding division of responsibilities between  the local and higher levels of Government. This results in wastage of resources, time, duplication and over emphasis on a handful of regions or communities at the cost of other and hence overall national level implementation suffers.

Another important tool is the local level participatory and integrated planning which ought to be done by the local bodies and later integrated as part of the larger district or provincial plans. A few countries including India had initiated this exercise which is a remarkable way of ensuring participation and ownership of the local population in the day to day development affairs. However line ministries which works in silos in most countries and where the biggest chunk of government funds are parked, rarely acknowledges such people oriented and rights based exercises. Most plans prepared with the help of people’s participation are poorly addressed / responded and at some places never addressed by line departments and individual parallel thematic plans are prepared without the consent of the people. This results in again delayed, poor implementation or duplication of efforts. Worst of all, this discourages communities and hence participation and ownership suffers badly.

National Governments ought to ensure that line ministries especially key line ministries related to social, human and economic development draw their plans from the local body plans and not otherwise. Funds to be allocated to local bodies accordingly apart from untied funds for effective and all round implementation.

UN agencies can play a vital role in this by setting an example wherein they and their partner organizations prepares their respective plans in consultation with local communities and decentralized governments in rural and urban areas. There need to be a paradigm shift in UN agencies which should first recognize and appreciate the Constitutionality and Legal force behind the local organizations to send a message to other agencies and the Government to follow suit. Parallel efforts not taking into account the importance and indispensability of the local government will result in unplanned, unsystematic an d scattered implementation.

National Governments at the central level, provincial level, district and sub-district level need to set up coordination mechanisms wherein all development agencies working in that particular unit of planning share their information and data with regard to their work on a mandatory basis. This should cover UN agencies as well. An efficient coordination, monitoring and facilitating mechanism between the Government and Non-Government development agencies can remove many biases, gaps and grey areas which otherwise impede free and fair implementation.

In terms of capacity development of national and sub-national entities, well a lot has been done so far by different development agencies under some or the other intervention. What is required is creation of an enabling fiscal and functional environment to deliver as a result of those capacity building initiatives. What is required is sensitization and incentivization of delivery mechanisms and personnel to align themselves with the needs, plans and decisions of local bodies as per the law and not to over ride mass sentiments.

Last but not the least UN agencies alongwith other development groups should on a continuous basis undertake orientation and capacity development of political representatives at all levels of government in a particular country. This should be with respect to pushing for more devolution and authority to local bodies (as laid down in the Constitution), improved understanding and ownership of bottom up people’s planning processes and framing of policies which are more rights based than mere philanthropy or charity oriented. 

Thank you.

Best wishes,

Ramit

Ramit Basu • Independent Development Sector Consultant at Not affiliated to any organization from India

 

Dear Moderator and Friends,

Thanks for appreciating my contribution.

Further to my submission earlier, I could see a huge possibility of convergence of various national and regional level initiatives at the local government level for desirable outcomes and most importantly ensuring that no one is left out. 

Be it decentralized data collection and validation, application of science and technology for solution to local level problems, addressing problems that span across the jurisdiction of a particular local govermnent (and embraces many), low cost solutions and involvement of the community in planning, monitoring and innovation etc. - all these can be realized with a focus on rejuvenating local bodies and vesting powers and authority in them. 

I would like to quote an example. Many parts of India are suffering from the impact of extreme weather conditions which has been as a result of climate change but also exacerbated with the El Nino effect. However local indigenous knowledge and techniques of water conservation and use, extreme weather tolerant crops and cropping patterns, fodder for livestock and biodiversity enrichment methods holds the key to such problems. For all these to materialize, the local community has to have a plan endorsed by the local government institution and then all departments and agencies of the Government need to respect and respond to that plan with necessary resources and back up. Individual efforts by line departments at their own (higher) level many a times results in silo/vertical working resulting in duplication and wastage of resources. Most importantly schemes and policies rolled out by different line ministries (to satisfy their own constituencies) actually confuses lower level implementation mechanism. This can be minimized when the people's plan is referred to as the bottomline and the top down blanket approach is shelved.

The UN and other associated agencies need to necessarily invest its financial and human resources in strengthening these local body plans as otherwise, these local bodies in most cases lack the technical and professional skills of preparing a robust and all inclusive plan. Most importantly activities and work which spills over the jurisdiction of a single local body.The UN also need to set an example of investing its resources as untied funds to the local bodies (on a pilot basis) and provide extensive support in the effective utilization of such funds for other orders of the Government to learn from such lessons and consider replication and upscaling. Sadly this is not happening now and all resources and investment of the UN agencies ultimately land up at the regional and sub-regional level thus getting caught in bureaucracy and red tapism, most of the times. 

Research organizations many a times invests heavily and develops low cost solutions to local problems but fails to integrate it with the day to day working of the community. The lab to land approach hence takes a backseat and this gap can be fulfilled when they converge and appropriately empower the local government institution in disseminating these technologies. The other advantage is a suitable transfer of technology (as these are heavily funded research projects by the Government) to the local government which can then turn the opportunity into livelihood generation at the local level. 

For example in the Bundelkhand region of Central India which is again a badly hit drought prone area owing to failure of rains, central institutions (also located in the Bundelkhand region) like the Indian Grassland and Fodder Research Institute and the Central Agroforestry Research Institute can very well share their ideas, innovations and techniques developed with the local Government Institutions thus helping in dissemination and helping the communities cope with the impact of climate change. Such collaborations can also go a long way in addressing issues like malnutrition, poor livestock health, increasing the green cover and helping the local affected population ensure food security. These collaborations should be materialized by the UN agencies as a consortium and as an example of working as one which also sends an example to the Government and other organizations of following suit.

Helping the local Governments tackle the local level problems through appropriate devolution will also offset the negligence by higher level politicians who prefers his or her constituency compared to others or a particular class of population vis a vis the others - a phenomenon we quite often notice in developing and not so developed countries. Such an approach will also have the potential of supporting newly formed states and territories and those emerged from long term conflict to rebuild themselves and help people get engaged with productive activities thus alleviating further chances of conflict to a great extent.

Thank you,

Best wishes,

Ramit

 

 

Ramit Basu • Independent Development Sector Consultant at Not affiliated to any organization from India

Dear Moderator and colleagues, I am very impressed how many converging points have been raised in discussing National Implementation, coming from different regions/continents, nations and professional backgrounds. Ramit brings the need for local engagement and empowerment in developing local plans to be recognized and taken into consideration by municipal public agents.  I would add that, for this local context issues/demands, when we take the federative form of government in Republics as is the case of Brazil with three tiers of government (federal, state/provincial and municipal tiers) in which all of them, including the municipal level have its own hierarquic and coherently integrated Constitutions as to regulate their autonomy, it is a very complex and, I would say, expensive manner of public administration. For Brazil we still have a lack contents and practice of political education in families and in school´s curriculum at primary, secondary and higher education.  I see this appropriate absence of political civic participation as a trickery element for fragmentation in society and in reproduction of uncoherence and unresponsiveness of public sphere to social and enviromental concers.  The only dimension of development which is still responded is the economic dimension, mostly reduced to economic growth measured in Gross Domestic Product and issues which are embraced by the ODS 8 in the 2030 Agenda.  I see the newer generations (I am from 1964) 'culturally' trained for achieving their social and economic value only as consumers and professionals/workers, but not as citizens participating at local, state/province and national political institutions.  I can see this institutionally and economically engendred depoliticized generation of children, adolescents and young adults generations (those born since the 80´s in Brazil) when I am teaching the courses I am responsible for in the Environmental Science Bachelor course in the federal university I work (including topics of civism, environmental citizenship, public policies, governance topics).  I´ve had to innovative teaching creating lab practices of politicizing the environmental field and the society/State interface.  Thus, I would like to raise a proposition to this discussion on the question of UN supporting National Implementation which is: remember that there are universities which could be valued and funded to support projects and programs of social, economic, institutional and environmental innovation in responding demands, in a participatory process, in implementation of sustainable development agendas, either from national, provincial or municipal/local communities and public agents, accomplishing university mission in integrating research, teaching and outreach/extension activities.  Brazilian legislation in innovation surprisingly supports funding universities for innovation applied to business.  I am disappointed that the national policy recently approved for science, tecnology and innovation also defines the concept of innovation restricted to business 'clients'.  I mean there is a huge uncoherence of public policies and legal frameworks (approved by the Legislative authorities and regulated by the Executive Authorities) in relation to sustainable development concept and agendas.  Those who write proposals for public policies are not demanded from public sphere agents their recognition of sustainable development agendas (either Agenda 21, MDG Agenda or, I guess and expect, Agenda 2030).  Any suggestion of why that happens?  I see the non-binding/voluntary approach of these sustainable development, development or environmental agendas in a global scale and, on the other hand, the binding trade, investment and financial global agreements (as the Transpacific Partnership) which are solely driven by the economic/business/intelectual property perspective and subverting the power game of National Policies versus Corporations´ rights/duties. In Brazil, there is one nationally funded program called PROEXT at the Ministry of Education which aims to support other ministries´ sectoral public policies, but not yet a clear area for funding in implementing Sustainable Development Agendas, even the forgotten Agenda 21 which never was recognized as reference for designing the national, provincial and municipal government plans (Pluriannual Plans), kept detached or seen as a single budget line in the planning and budgeting process.  I had two previous experiences of funding the the PROEXT through the Ecocidades Extension Program (www.ecocidades.uff.br) which had clear and documented impact from building capacities and engaging participants in communities and local committees at municipalities, as well as impacts at the students in higher education, engaging them for 'turning around that face/body' from a solely 'hygienic depolitized professional or scientific career' and building a civic experience and engagement, opening possibilities of civic driven change for their sense of purpose of knowledge in higher education.  The institutional mission of universities in Brasil establishes research/teaching/extension as an integrated agenda.  However, when we look at sources of funding to academic staff and when we see the institutional plan for salaries and career path in federal universities, the social value is mostly based on how many scientific papers and publications, mostly with international audience, are 'produced'.  The productivity paradigm detaches Universities from local communities and local contexts as to turn them into barns of publishable scientific knowledge. I have already shared, with this discussion group, a case study paper in a global call by UNDP, UNICEF and UN Women, on Participatory Monitoring and Accountability, which moderators are already aware and that Ramit and colleagues may like to look at, in which I mention recommendations towards funding for binding Universities to community demands.  Sorry for reposting and see attached. Kind Regards Prof. Dr Patricia Almeida Ashley Nucleo de Estudos em EcoPoliticas e EConsCiencias - www.ecopoliticas.uff.br International Policy and Research on Territories of Social Responsibility - www.intsr.uff.br Programa de Extensao Ecocidades - www.ecocidades.uff.br Environmental Science Course - www.cienciaambiental.uff.br Department of Geoenvironmental Analysis - Institute of Geosciences Niteroi - RJ - Brazil Em 15/03/2016 06:11, notification@unteamworks.org escreveu:

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Posted on: E-discussion Facilitator New comment on Discussion National Implementation by Not affiliated to any organization :   Dear Moderator and

 

Dear Moderator and Friends,

Thanks for appreciating my contribution.

Further to my submission earlier, I could see a huge possibility of convergence of various national and regional level initiatives at the local government level for desirable outcomes and most importantly ensuring that no one is left out. 

Be it decentralized data collection and validation, application of science and technology for solution to local level problems, addressing problems that span across the jurisdiction of a particular local govermnent (and embraces many), low cost solutions and involvement of the community in planning, monitoring and innovation etc. - all these can be realized with a focus on rejuvenating local bodies and vesting powers and authority in them. 

I would like to quote an example. Many parts of India are suffering from the impact of extreme weather conditions which has been as a result of climate change but also exacerbated with the El Nino effect. However local indigenous knowledge and techniques of water conservation and use, extreme weather tolerant crops and cropping patterns, fodder for livestock and biodiversity enrichment methods holds the key to such problems. For all these to materialize, the local community has to have a plan endorsed by the local government institution and then all departments and agencies of the Government need to respect and respond to that plan with necessary resources and back up. Individual efforts by line departments at their own (higher) level many a times results in silo/vertical working resulting in duplication and wastage of resources. Most importantly schemes and policies rolled out by different line ministries (to satisfy their own constituencies) ! actually confuses lower level implementation mechanism. This can be minimized when the people's plan is referred to as the bottomline and the top down blanket approach is shelved.

The UN and other associated agencies need to necessarily invest its financial and human resources in strengthening these local body plans as otherwise, these local bodies in most cases lack the technical and professional skills of preparing a robust and all inclusive plan. Most importantly activities and work which spills over the jurisdiction of a single local body.The UN also need to set an example of investing its resources as untied funds to the local bodies (on a pilot basis) and provide extensive support in the effective utilization of such funds for other orders of the Government to learn from such lessons and consider replication and upscaling. Sadly this is not happening now and all resources and investment of the UN agencies ultimately land up at the regional and sub-regional level thus getting caught in bureaucracy and red tapism, most of the times. 

Research organizations many a times invests heavily and develops low cost solutions to local problems but fails to integrate it with the day to day working of the community. The lab to land approach hence takes a backseat and this gap can be fulfilled when they converge and appropriately empower the local government institution in disseminating these technologies. The other advantage is a suitable transfer of technology (as these are heavily funded research projects by the Government) to the local government which can then turn the opportunity into livelihood generation at the local level. 

For example in the Bundelkhand region of Central India which is again a badly hit drought prone area owing to failure of rains, central institutions (also located in the Bundelkhand region) like the Indian Grassland and Fodder Research Institute and the Central Agroforestry Research Institute can very well share their ideas, innovations and techniques developed with the local Government Institutions thus helping in dissemination and helping the communities cope with the impact of climate change. Such collaborations can also go a long way in addressing issues like malnutrition, poor livestock health, increasing the green cover and helping the local affected population ensure food security. These collaborations should be materialized by the UN agencies as a consortium and as an example of working as one which also sends an example to the Government and other organizations of following suit.

Helping the local Governments tackle the local level problems through appropriate devolution will also offset the negligence by higher level politicians who prefers his or her constituency compared to others or a particular class of population vis a vis the others - a phenomenon we quite often notice in developing and not so developed countries. Such an approach will also have the potential of supporting newly formed states and territories and those emerged from long term conflict to rebuild themselves and help people get engaged with productive activities thus alleviating further chances of conflict to a great extent.

Thank you,

Best wishes,

Ramit

 

 

15 Mar 2016 [ read more ] [ reply ]

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Mohamedahmed Khalifa Mohamed

I think that the main factor to sustainable development goals ,is to achieve world peace.how we can set the variable theoretical underpinning of stopping the conflicts, we find that conflicts lead to instability of communities and that main loss of education to whole number of people. If we lost the the educated people we can't achieve SDGs.The most important question; how we can stop these conflicts?we see now days the all applicable laws by existing institutions are failed to stop or even reduce this conflicts. My roposal is to create a powerful global body which derives its strength from the the global consensus, and this body governs global relations by force of law, ans assist the countries.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for you comment. The 2030 Agenda recognizes that countries in conflict and post-conflict situations face major challenge to the achievement of durable peace and sustainable development, which means they require special attention (A/RES/70/1 - Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development). Also, we cannot forget that the SDG 16 is about promoting just, peaceful and inclusive societies.

Thinking about solutions from within countries, how do you think stakeholders (national/local governments, private sector and civil society) can be mobilized in order to promote peace and sustainable development?

John

Dear all, thank you all for all the valuable comments, I found this E-discussion form to be effective means for cross learning and sharing. I would like to build on all what has been said fostering strong partnership, sustaining the gains and capacity building to nurture resilience society.

 

As the UK Government has acknowledged in its report ‘The UK’s contribution to achieving the Millennium Development Goals’ (2005) “The goal of gender equality and the empowerment of women is a cross-cutting issue relevant to the achievement of all MDGs” (pg. 28)

 

 

Science, technology and innovation can be a tool with which to accelerate the achievement of the internationally agreed development goals, including the Millennium Development Goals.  Technology can, for instance, facilitate efforts to eradicate poverty, achieve food security, fight diseases, improve education and respond to the challenges of climate change.  Women entering paid employment in science, technology and innovation is a strong indicator of their integration into the market economy.  As women benefit from more regular income, they are more likely to achieve greater autonomy, self-reliance in the household and in their personal development, and decision-making power.

 

 

It is widely acknowledged that women remain the largest under-represented group when it comes to enterprise and innovation Northern Ireland is far below the EU figure for women’s entrepreneurial activity.  Women represent a huge pool of untapped potential and diversity and are an incubator for greater creativity and innovation.  Moreover, in sufficient numbers women will attract other women like magnets and bring cultural change.  The Economist magazine suggested that women are the single biggest and least acknowledged force for economic growth on the planet who have contributed more to the expansion of the world economy than either new technology or the emerging markets of China and India.

 

 

A time of economic challenge presents an opportunity to the brave to take a different approach and build a different economic model.  The women led Audur Capital in Iceland, whose directors warned against the excessive risk taking by financial institutions, heed two global trends: (1) The growing body of research that demonstrates that companies owned or managed by women yield a higher long term return; and (2) The growth opportunities in businesses that embrace values that enable them to turn social, ethical and environmental responsibility to their business advantage.

 

 

Childcare and employment should be explicitly linked.  Childcare for employment should be the framework for any childcare strategy inside which provision for children’s education and health should sit.  Governments should commit to work towards the goal of universal good quality, accessible and affordable childcare for all children up to the age of fourteen.  This is recommended in the CEDAW Concluding observations on the seventh periodic report of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (para 49).

 

 

Increasing the participation of girls in education means: the abolition of fees; adequate public resourcing of direct and indirect costs of schooling for the poorest households; appropriate budget allocations between primary, secondary and tertiary education; strengthened capacity at all levels of the education system to develop and deliver gender responsive education policies; and improved quality of education.

 

 

According to the International Labour Organisation, the gap between men and women in the scientific and technological fields is linked to pervasive gender roles and attitudes in different societies – visible in both developed and developing countries – which encourage girls to pursue ‘softer’ subjects.  In the UK there remains a persistence of traditional attitudes and stereotypes surrounding the educational pathways of women and girls.  This is particularly prevalent in the under-representation of women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics subjects which has a direct impact on not only the gender pay gap but in providing role models to encourage future women and girls in these subjects as mentioned in reports from the Commission on the Status of Women’s (CSW) 55th Session.  

(http://daccess-dds-ny.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/N10/686/79/PDF/N1068679.pdf?OpenElement.)

 

 

Associated with this, the UN Millennium Development Goals Report 2013 (http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/pdf/report-2013/mdg-report-2013-english.pdf) states that “the data suggest that women in developing regions are more likely than men to work as contributing family workers-on farms…” (Pg. 21) compared to the industries associated with science, technology and innovation where there are better prospects and security/social benefits.

 

 

Further work is needed to tackle the continued discrimination which makes it harder for women to enter formal employment and harder for them to stay employed.  Despite recommendations from the CEDAW Committee in 1999, 2008 and 2013, there is still no unified national strategy to implement CEDAW in the UK, its Overseas Territories and areas of work covered by its International Development work.  Training for Women Network are concerned that there may not be sufficiently developed commitment and leadership, co-ordination of strategies, and systematic monitoring of outcomes to ensure that CEDAW obligations are implemented, and these geographical inconsistencies could hamper overall progress on the realisation of rights guaranteed by CEDAW which would have a negative impact in achieving the indicators marking Millennium Development Goals progress.  There may be laws to address equality and human rights but they do not always include specific information prohibiting discrimination against women.

 

 

In 2008 the Conclusion of the International Labour Organisation’s International Labour Conference on Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development, emphasized that: “Training policies and programmes that aim to improve productivity and employability (…) need to ensure equality of opportunity, be free from discrimination and take into account family and household obligations. (…) A life-cycle approach has to be adopted to overcoming the challenges that confront women in gaining access to education and training and in utilizing this training to secure better employment. This includes: improving the access of girls to basic education; overcoming logistical, economic and cultural barriers to apprenticeships and to secondary and vocational training for young women – especially in non-traditional occupations; taking into account women’s home and care responsibilities when scheduling workplace-based learning and entrepreneurship training; and meeting the training needs of women re-entering the labour market and of older women who have not had equal access to opportunities for lifelong learning”.  These recommendations are essential in the achieving of many of the indicators associated with the Millennium Development Goals.

 

 

Women’s participation in political decision-making is constrained by prejudice, caring responsibilities, lack of family support mechanisms and unfriendly hours and conditions.  These wider ranging issues will need to be addressed if the goal of empowering women is to be met.  This is echoed in the CEDAW Concluding observations on the seventh periodic report of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland when it states “The Committee further recalls its previous concluding observations (A/63/38, paras. 284 and 285) and remains concerned at the low representation of women in the post-conflict process in Northern Ireland and the failure to fully implement Security Council Resolution 1325 (2000)” (para 43).

 

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. In addition to gender equality, what would be other key areas for making progress on and building national and sub-national capacities for sustainable development in your country? How do you think partnerships can contribute to foster capacity building for sustainable development?

John

I think this will be a really interesting conversation:

 

·         WASH, Women and Welfare: Social Protection from a Gender Perspective7 March 2016, Room XXII, Palais des Nations, GenevaIn the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, states committed again to realize the rights to safe drinking water and sanitation, and related rights to social protection and gender equality. Action is urgently needed: 2.4 billion people worldwide lack access to sanitation, resulting in 700,000 children under five dying each year. Women and girls risk sexual violence due to lack of private toilet facilities. UN and academic panelists at this side event discuss how to provide equal and non-discriminatory access to water and sanitation through a rights-based approach to ensure an adequate standard of living for all.

 

From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org] Sent: 03 March 2016 04:11To: j.mooney@twnonline.comSubject: [World We Want 2030] E-discussion Facilitator from Canada commented on the Discussion "National Implementation"

 

You can post a reply on

BNEIJARA (not verified)

Bonjour Tous,

Tant que les populations des pays et les Gouvernement ne sont pas conscient qu’ils sont les premiers responsable de leur développement le monde ne va jamais changé et le fossé se creusera de plus. Si vous voyez les montants que les pays developpés investissent dans l'aide publique au developpement sans aucun guichet de financement pour la societé civile locale les interventions serviront d'autres nations et non les africains car ils ne sont pas encore mature. Prenons le cas de l'urgence au Sahel aujourd'hui chaque pays envoi ces ONG et elle deviennent recpiendaire des financement d'urgence parfois au detriment même des agence onusienne. L'emploi, la production; les finances rurales sont des rêves pour tout un continent qui n'arrive pas à decoller. Cette aujourd'hui attise l'accaparement des terres l'extremisme, les conflits etc...... On ne peut implementer que se que nous maitrisons si nous prenons le cas des engagement des gouvernant sur les 10% du budget sur l'agricultures  (Maputo) les aprtenaires auraient une tache importante de soutenir les efforts de la SC locale pour faire respecter les engagements.

E-discussion Facilitator

Merci pour votre commentaire. À votre avis, comment pouvons-nous établi des partenariats afin d'assurer une action concertée entre toutes les parties prenantes?

BNEIJARA (not verified)

Bonjour

Si l’aide au développement a pour but de contribuer à une amélioration significative et durable des conditions de vie des populations, elle doit se traduit en premier lieu par l’assistance destinée à renforcer les capacités nationales et aux autres partenaires du pays afin qu’ils puissent concevoir et mettre en œuvre de manière efficace les programmes et les projets. Cela  doit obligatoirement passer par le renforcement des capacités permettant  aux institutions nationales d’améliorer la planification, la gestion et l’exécution des priorités nationales de développement pour une prise de décision en connaissance de cause et pour assurer un contrôle national important des plans de développement et de la gestion des ressources.

Le développement de ces capacités par le biais du renforcement des institutions nationales (OSC et communes) est indispensable à l’obtention de résultats durables en matière de développement.

Prenons un exemple concret la Mauritanie notre pays aujourd’hui ne dispose d’aucun mécanisme de financement de ces institutions nationales et locales.

Chaque partenaire développe son plan d’intervention et il est approuvé et exécuté sans aucune forme d’appropriation (les structures nationales sont tellement faibles). Nos partenaires étant plus forts que nous (OSC et communes) et notre Gouvernement deviennent facilement nos tuteurs ce qui posera à l’avenir des véritables contraintes à cela il faut ajouter les changements climatiques et l’augmentation de la population.

Kader Lawaly

Je pense que l'aide au développement aux payx pauvres est toujouirs la bienvenue, mais faut-il que cette aide soit bien utilisé pour le bien être de nos populations nécessiteuses. C'est pour cela qu'un changement de comportemet et de mentalité s'impose à tous et à toutes, notamment à nos Gouvernants. Donc il est plusque nécessaire d'oeuvrer pour le renforcement des capacités de nos dirigeants dans le domaine de la conscientisation et de la bonne Gouvernance en vue d'un plus grand engagement citoyen.

E-discussion Facilitator

Merci pour votre commentaire. Comment pensez-vous que les Nations Unies peuvent contribuer au renforcement de capacités national et sous-national afin de obtenir meilleurs résultats?

Robert Ruitenbeek • Managing Director / Owner at iNVENTUR! from Netherlands

 How can the SDGs be effectively mainstreamed into relevant national sustainable development policies and programmes, while preserving countries' policy space to pursue national priorities? How can the UN development system best support this?

By helping identify and adress SDG's adherence to national development policies and programmes at the appropiate governmental levels; if SDG's equals or less than national ambition and sufficiently mainstreamed no further action is required, else steps to local adherence to UN SDG's ambition should be discussed and agreed upon

 What are key areas for making progress on and building national and sub-national capacities for sustainable development, and how do they differ across country contexts (e.g. least developed countries, middle income countries, high-income countries, countries in situations of fragility etc.)? When and how can partnerships effectively contribute to capacity building and sustainable development?

To be identified key areas are nation specific, possibly comparable on international level. While the Netherlands might focus on reducing global warming and healthcare, more fragile countries might want to focus on eradicating famine, poverty, illiteracy and developing education and infrastructure. Effective partnerships stem from a shared but also complementary knowledgebase, sufficient funding and resources. Measurability of progress on the effectiveness of partnerships and SDG achievements requires a cloud based datastore and webapps using a uniform framework of indicators, processes, business rules and workflow

 What steps are necessary to ensure that all stakeholders, including the government, private sector and civil society can readily exchange information and experiences? How can "peer exchange" be established and nurtured?

Identify indicators and construct indicator framework; Identify processes, business rules and workflow; Design, build & implement multiplatform web/app based information system using a cloud based datastore and facilitate third party integration and interaction using an Application Program Interface (API) and/or webservices exposing the required functions and interfaces; Implement processes, business rules, workflow and IAM for effective interaction with and between subscribers;

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment and for sharing concrete suggestions on how technology can be used to effectively mainstream SDGs into national contexts. Could you tell us more about your experience creating and maintaining "peer exchange" networks that readily exchange information and experiences?

Robert Ruitenbeek • Managing Director / Owner at iNVENTUR! from Netherlands

Thanks for your reply and question. As an independent IT consultant and IT Project manager I have knowledge of the underlying architectural & technical aspects and hands-on experience in developing, implementing and maintaining suggested type of solutions for a range of markets. Using Information standards (e.g. TWW2030 Indicator Framework), information exchange contracts, business processes, business  rules, workflow templates and Identity & Access Management (IAM) have been main IT topics for the past 15 years.

To my opinion what the TWW2030 programme needs is a social network alike platform enriched with formalized information exchange using the TWW2030 Indicator Framework (IF), user interfaces supporting the IF, mechanism for implementing and maintaining TWW2030 business rules and workflow and a third party API and/or webservices for integration with partnership specific information systems. All data is collected and maintained using a cloud based datastore. For maximum functional and technical flexibility all the data is organized using a key-value pair pattern.

Following this approach peer exchange between any combination of stakeholders is directed and controlled through agreed upon business processes, business rules, workflow and IAM. Such a platform only presents and/or requests the data your are privileged to read, write, change and/or delete. Business processes and rules determine the validity and automated handling of (inter)nationally collected TWW2030 data while workflow templates determine when and whom is needs to be adressed for human intervention (e.g. validation/enrichment/correction). (Inter)nationaly collected data stored in the cloud based global datastore can by accessed by authorized third parties using the suggested API and/or webservices for specific data analysis, visualizations and reporting.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. In your experience, once a knowledge plataform is created, what is necessary to engage people in order to get them to actually contribute to "peer exchange"?

Robert Ruitenbeek • Managing Director / Owner at iNVENTUR! from Netherlands

Thanks for your question. As in any programme and underlying projects, to get people involved, engaged and committed to contribute they need continuous feedback on actual state, progress and achievements relevant to TWW2030 goals and related targets. The bigger the programme the more it's success depends on well defined automated data streams condensed into multiview dashboards showing (near) real time infographics on progress. For this the TWW2030 programme can achieve this using mobile technology partnering with mobile operators.  For instance, using big data showing by coverage that a specific (inter)national region is really involved can be a trigger or incentive to other regions to engage in getting involved. The same goes for more detailed feedback on specific TWW2030 goals and targets.

BNEIJARA (not verified)

Bonjour,

Les États membres doivent élaborer les PNDD dans un délai retenu en commun accord et sur lequel les NU veilleront. Les examens nationaux doivent se faire annuellement le pays ils doivent être conduits par le Gouvernement et le FPHN s’assurer  de la participation effective du publique, de la société civile,  du secteur privé, des parlementaires et des maires à ces examens. Ces examens doivent être conduit par le Gouvernement mais le SNU doit veiller sur la bonne coordination et l’engagement de tous les acteurs dans ce processus.

2016-03-05 15:46 GMT+00:00 <notification@unteamworks.org>:

You can post a

Kader Lawaly

Pour il est nécessaire que les informations au développement soient le mieux partager pour permettre aux décideurs de bien cibler les nécessités de nos pays en matière d'appui au développement. Ces informations doivent être justes et réelles et que nous passons aux actions concrètes pour sauver nos pays de la pauvreté. Le Mercredi 2 mars 2016 19h17, "notification@unteamworks.org" <notification@unteamworks.org> a écrit :

Patricia Almeida Ashley • Associate Professor at Universidade Federal Fluminense from Brazil

Dear Robert,

Your comment and mine are in the same directions on adherence or alignment into national public policies.  See the case I attached in my comments telling the disalignment or non-adherence of Agenda 21 in Brazilian public planning at national, provincial and municipal levels.  I can expect the same from Agenda 2030, especially because of non alignment of global or multilateral trade and investment agreements, apart from the agenda being a non-binding global one, while TPP, for example is a binding one and does not consider or mention Agenda 2030. See my comment published previously:    "For the question "How can the SDGs be effectively mainstreamed into relevant national sustainable development policies and programmes, while preserving countries' policy space to pursue national priorities? How can the UN development system best support this?"    Firstly - public policy planning tools, UN and country-members to identify policy non communication of global Agenda 2030 goals and targets as a source for national policy planning documents, as the Pluriannual Plans of country-members.  See attached a case study of detachment of Agenda 21 from governmental planning and budgeting;    Secondly - legal frameworks, UN and country-members to identify legal frameworks outdated in concept or uncoherent with principles, goals and means of implementation, requiring a database on legislation at national and subnational levels on coherent and uncoherent frameworks or new proposals;    Thirdly - sharing national experiences at regional and global levels, with a global database of national sustainable development strategy and means of implementation;    Fourthly - information and communication technology for participatory monitoring and accountability, to support all above with open free and easy transparent platform of country by country national plans, budgets year by year, as well as subnational arrangements for integration of global, national and subnational plans."    Ecocidades Ashley, Ferraz and Albuquerque Participatory Monitoring and Accountability Paper October 2014.pdf

Robert Ruitenbeek • Managing Director / Owner at iNVENTUR! from Netherlands

Dear Patricia,

Thanks for your comment.

Reading your comprehensive paper concluding on the absence of coordinated funding and (de)centralized governmental planning, coordination and resulting disalignment during implementation of the Agenda 21 I ask myself if and how these impediments can be adressed from the TWW2030 programme.

From a national perspective (Netherlands) I experience the same disconnection at an individual level. While The Netherlands as a nation are commited to the TWW2030 programme for now it lacks the required cohesion and exposure essential for awareness and coherence in advancing the TWW2030 programme. Information is hard to find. Having this said, the national commitment does involve preparations needed for implementing the TWW2030 indicator framework and the recent launch of a national (non-TWW2030) indicator monitor application used by and for all 600 municipalities. Also a number of municipalities have already set goals to meet the TWW2030 programme.

From this background I ask myself could the suggested technology (e.g. web/mobile app) be used to overcome the initial information gap you have reported on by offering the community general information on how the TWW2030 programme is/wil be organized on a international and national levels provided with information on global and local actors, how they interrelate and cooperate, roles and contact information. Could this approach be used to expedite national implementation of the TWW2030 programme.

Robert Ruitenbeek • Managing Director / Owner at iNVENTUR! from Netherlands

Dear Robert, Indeed, I would support your point of view to be relevant for both Netherlands and Brazil, as well as other countries.  The case study demonstrates how the ICT could transpose obstacles for training, information, data sharing (see website of the case study at www.agenda21comperj.com.br where you find the 14 Local Agenda 21 of 14 municipalities and the website www.ecocidades.uff.br where we have been offering, when we have budget from the public funding, for information, training and advisory services. At the moment, in 2016, we are developing a web application for public access on a database of public policies that could contribute for SDG.  We expect to make them available by end of 2016, once funding and IT team is small yet. See more of what I have been involved with at www.intsr.uff.br and www.princeclauschair.nl I appreciate your opinions and perspectives from ICT for knowledge development and wider social and collective engagement. Greetings Patricia Em 03/03/2016 10:36, notification@unteamworks.org escreveu:

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Posted on: Implementing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development New comment on Discussion National Implementation by Robert Ruitenbeek IT Consultant from Netherlands : Dear Patricia, Thanks for

Dear Patricia,

Thanks for your comment.

Reading your comprehensive paper concluding on the absence of coordinated funding and (de)centralized governmental planning, coordination and resulting disalignment during implementation of the Agenda 21 I ask myself if and how these impediments can be adressed from the TWW2030 programme.

From a national perspective (Netherlands) I experience the same disconnection at an individual level. While The Netherlands as a nation are commited to the TWW2030 programme for now it lacks the required cohesion and exposure essential for awareness and coherence in advancing the TWW2030 programme. Information is hard to find. Having this said, the national commitment does involve preparations needed for implementing the TWW2030 indicator framework and the recent launch of a national (non-TWW2030) indicator monitor application used by and for all 600 municipalities. Also a number of municipalities have already set goals to meet the TWW2030 programme.

From this background I ask myself could the suggested technology (e.g. web/mobile app) be used to overcome the initial information gap you have reported on by offering the community general information on how the TWW2030 programme is/wil be organized on a international and national levels provided with information on global and local actors, how they interrelate and cooperate, roles and contact information. Could this approach be used to expedite national implementation of the TWW2030 programme.

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DEGBE Jean-Claude Paul • Cotonou at ONG Participation Active des Dirigeants Jeunes Elites Niant l'Aboulie from Benin

Nous sommes heureux pour cette grande nouvelle, cette décision pour les ODD sont bien pour les pays en voie du développement, il faut bien revoir son organisation avec la politique des gouvernants, car nous constatons que les majorités de ses fonds sont utilisé pour les séminaires et ateliers de formation sans suite de résultat pragmatique.  Nous souhaitons que les programmes soit organisé de manière stratégique avec suivi pour que les victimes soit intégré et puisse bénéficier de ses fonds, et que les experts puisse élaborer le programme pour que cela puisse rendre les bénéficier autonome.

E-discussion Facilitator

Merci pour votre commentaire. Vous avez identifié le renforcement des capacités des dirigeants comme condition essentielle au développement. Comment pensez-vous que les Nations Unies peuvent mieux soutenir ce processus?

BNEIJARA (not verified)

Bonjour,

Nous connaissons les problèmes que rencontre lesgouvernements, l’insécurité la menaces terroristes, la flambée des prix ;le chômage des jeunes dépassant parfois les 40%,  les changements climatiques ; les échecsdes expériences de développement durant les cinquante dernière années en Afrique.Les nations unis par le FPHN sont sollicité pour faire avancer  les ODD et veiller sur leur qualité par cetteplate forme qui doit vulgariser les ODD dans chaque pays elle doit êtreprésente dans chaque pays et immédiatement (avant la fin 2016) poursuivre appuyer les pays pour l’élaboration des plans nationaux de développementdurable. Si non ces ODD ne seront ni connu ni approprié avant 2030 surtout parles pays fragiles. Cela n’est pas en contradiction avec la souveraineté desEtat à conduire leur processus.

2016-03-04 22:07 GMT+00:00 <notification@unteamworks.org>:

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Akaash Maharaj

GOPAC -- the Global Organization of Parliamentarians Against Corruption -- strongly supports the Sustainable Development Goals, and believes that Goal 16 in particular correctly identifies the imperative for the nations of the world to combat corruption, as a critical means of achieving social and economic development.The UN Development Programme has estimated that the developing world loses €10 to corruption for every €1 it receives in official aid.  Moreover, GOPAC estimates that corruption now kills more people across the world than war and famine combined. No matter what else the international community may do, we will simply not achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, unless we are able to significantly contain and reduce corruption in public institutions.GOPAC’s research has demonstrated conclusively that – across all regions, political systems, and cultures – strong parliaments are unambiguously correlated with reduced corruption, while weak parliaments are correlated with increased corruption.

By the very nature of their role, parliamentarians are the watchdogs of democracy, and it is tragic when citizens come accept their watchdogs muting their bark, muzzling their bite, or being neutered by the very powers they are meant to hold at bay.  Ultimately, effective parliamentary oversight is the single most effective component in the state system to discourage, detect, and defeat corruption.Our call is, therefore, simple to articulate, though often difficult to realise: to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, combatting corruption in public administration must be our first priority, and to succeed in that effort, we must cultivate and empower a vigilant, relentless, and fearless community of parliamentarians, to stand between our leaders and the levers of power.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment and support for the Sustainable Development Goals! Can you tell us more about role played by national / local partnerships (government, private sector and civil society) in eliminating corruption in Canada? In your opinion, what steps would be necessary to ensure that all stakeholders can readily exchange information and collaborate? How can the UN development system best support this?

BNEIJARA (not verified)

Bonjour,

Les ODD ou le nouveau système de développement mondial est une nouvelle approche de qui dépendra l’avenir du monde.  A l’instar de tous processus de développement son efficacité dépendra de la : la Planification – la Programmation-Budgétisation et  le Suivi évaluation.  Il urge que le forum politique de haut niveau pour le développement durable des Nations Unies soit représenté dans chaque pays et institution régionale pour appuyer ce nouveau processus des ODD sous l’égide des nations unies qui on mandat de veiller sur la gouvernance mondiale, les NU doivent assumer leur responsabilité.

Les indicateurs de développement durable à l’horizon 2030 doivent être définis à l’échelle mondiale par le FPHN, c’est ainsi qu’il reviendra à chaque gouvernement appuyé par un représentant national du FPHN  de fixer ses propres indicateurs  nationaux pour répondre aux ambitions mondiales tout en tenant compte des spécificités nationales du pays. Chaque pays aura son plan de développement durable validé par le FPHN il mettra en place les structures nécessaires. Le FPHN national aura à veiller à l’alignement des partenaires encore sur le plan national de développement durable du pays garantissant ainsi l’efficacité de la coopération en matière de développement

E-discussion Facilitator

Merci pour votre commentaire. Le FPHN est le principale plate-forme des Nations Unies sur le développement durable. Entre autres choses, il assure le leadership politique, des orientations et des recommandations. À votre avis, ce qui peut être fait pour engager les pays dans le FPHN?

Séverin SINDIZERA

In national implementation, It is very good for internationnal NGOs to carry out their projects in partnership with the indigenous peoples NGOs closely because if they work in direct with our group of Batwa it is problem. Their personnal burundians do not know the culture of our community Batwa for development of this indigenous peoples community and sometimes it is also difficult to know if the Batwa are satisfied of  the grant through the burundians who are not indigenous peoples.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment! Based on your experience, what types of partnerships do you think would best foster capacity building for sustainable and inclusive development in Burundi? What steps do you think would be needed to ensure that all stakeholders, including the government, private sector and local civil society can readily collaborate and exchange information and experiences?

Yvan Trésor (not verified)

Hello dear friends,

For me the SDGs can be integrated into national sustainable development policies and relevant programs, while preserving the policy space of countries to pursue national priorities based on systems and development programs already underway, we can agree that all UN member states do not need to achieve these 17 objectives on the same order of priority, this can be measured by the level of development of each country. For these  SDGs can be integrated into national policies without interfering in their policy areas, I believe we must rely on organizations, communities, associations and individuals who already works for the proper development of the welfare of their country providing support and a clear vision on the agenda in 2030 for sustainable development by conducting practical programs of sensitization.

For example in my country BURUNDI, we still torn between the need to move forward and fear of a political crisis that could result in a civil war, in which case the urgent need of the population is the return of good governance, freedom of expression and to be the return of civil and political refugees and the promotion of a free and peaceful society commit to the development of the country and no for its destruction.

The United Nations development system could support it based on his experience and influence by implementing activities and programs to restore harmony and respect between the people and the leaders, ensuring the commitment everyone to get involved in their own development and that of the agenda 2030 for sustainable development.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. In your opinion, in countries facing conflic or post-conflict situations, what can be done to foster organizations, communities, associations and individuals to work together towards achieving the SDGs?

Séverin SINDIZERA

About implementation in national level for indigenous peoples, we need to set up the specific policies of this community in the governement and in the UN agencies. The second, the partnership I say is important between the indigenous peoples NGOs and international NGOs as the UN agencies to carry out together the action plan of SDGs. The copacity building in the mitigation, adaptation and technologic transfer  of climate change and in other areas of SDGs

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. In your opinion, what can be done to foster indigenous organizations, communities, associations and individuals to work together towards achieving the SDGs? How can partnerships effectively contribute to capacity building and sustainable development in Burundi?

James WAKIAGA • Economics Advisor at UNDP

The national implementation of the SDGs could benefit from the MDGs best practice that could be filtered across countries that achieved significant  progress over the last 15 years in putting a dent to poverty. Ethiopia stands out as one of the countries in the LDC and SSA that achieved tremendous progress in meeting most of the MDGs by the target deadline. Some of the lessons to be drawn partly relates to the imperative of stremlining the goals to the national development stratefy and indeed the  experience of stremlining the MDGs in the national development plans played a big role in recording the success. As the country embarked on drafting the second generation of the Growth and Transformation Plan (GTP II) (2016-2020), they have managed to align the GTP pillars with the SDGs and this work was facilitated by UNDP CO and DESA to ensure  consitency and harmonization in line with Agenda 2030. UNDP has also taken lead in the context of DaO to spearhead UN support in delivering the SDGs in Ethiopia. In this regard, we deeloped a rollout strategy that was discussed with UN country team and shared with the National Planning Commission with a view to build consensus and national ownership of the process. The draft strategy note takes on board the UNDG Guideline on the SDG implementation as well as the MAPS and t major segment of activities will focus on advocacy, mainstreaming and localization. The issue of localization of SDGs is critical for the success of the SDGs and this is particularly important for countries that are  are pursuing devolved sytems of governing/ decentralization  such as Ethiopia. It is an opportunity/ entry point  that could be  leveraged  by using  local capacities for the implementation as well as monitoring of the SDGs. 

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. Can you tell us more about how the SDGs were included in the regional/local development agenda in Ethiopia?

Deng Ajang Gak

The South Sudan is an ancient Nilotic territory in Africa; despite the new independence of South Sudan, development challenges and opportunities remain outstanding issues. As independent state, vulnerability and fragility remain major threats to the nation building process. Historic inequality and lack of sustainable development has triggered the welfare of the inhabitants in this millennium era. The millennium development was architecture and engineered to alleviate extreme poverty, improve the educational and health conditions, narrow the discrimination based on gender, promote sustainability and generate global partnerships for mutual beneficial relationships between people and nations. Prior to the independence of the Republic of South Sudan, the millennium development goals were sort of absent goals and targets jeopardized by the civil war and protracted conflicts and successive disaster. Subsequently, the progressively formatting institutions started the processes of peace and nation building starting either from scratch or from what was found available with the national and international contexts. Given the precarious developmental conditions, prioritizations become an enormous concern. The development and security nexus was not limpid and clear in the actions of the executive institutions,  policy-makers and aspirations of the liberated population. This paper seeks to bring portrait about development in South Sudan with the framework of the millennium development goals and the post 2015 agenda on the sustainable development agenda, as well as the 2030 agenda and the national agenda. Conducting a rapid online self-administered survey and semi-structured interview with peers and  privileged informants, i intend to bring to evidence the challenges facing the nation building process in context of development and security priorities, specially the implementation and financing priorities.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thanks for your comments. Can you tell us more about the conclusions of your research?

Mustafa Bakuluzzaman (not verified)

SDG Implemenation in Civic participation and monitoring

Is SGD only target implementating institute Government? If not, Government is key actor of SDG implementor. If Government Key implementor, what is the monitoring and reporting system for universal? Who can validate the data?  What is the participatory monitoring mechanism. What are the engagement process and role of civil society organization in SDG like as CBO, NGO, INGO, corporate and private sector? In the past experienced of MDG, we have seen limited access of civil society and there is no systematic process. The MDG was mainly target in government. In the lesson learning we have not fully success of MDG.  The MDG main absence was people’s participation and ownership mechanism for ensuring performance, accountability & transparency and targeted success. The User did not know all targets, active role and their function. So most of the work did not sustainable and continue. We do not see same repaid learning think MDG to  SDG. The highlist of SDG will be

  • Community participation and ownership mechanism can ensure community, civil society participation, performance, accountability, transparency, sustainability and targeted success of SDG. 
  • Participation model for Government, NGO, private sector, civil society parcice can solve progress and sustainablilty. 
E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your participation in this second week of our e-discussion on national implementation of the 2030 Agenda. In what regards who is responsible for implementing the SDGs, the UN resolution that adopted the 2030 Agenda (A/RES/70/1) states that "countries  and  all  stakeholders,  acting  in  collaborative  partnership,  will implement this plan" (Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development ). It is also importat to bear in mind that SDG target 16.7 aims to “Ensure responsive, inclusive, participatory and representative decision-making at all levels”. In your experience, what needs to be done to engage all stakeholders (Government, private sector, civil society) in furthering the SDGs at the country level?

BNEIJARA (not verified)

Bonjour,

Selon notre expérience, ce qui frappe dans notre pays laMauritanie  est le manque général decoordination au niveau des structures chargées de coordonner les politiques. Cemanque de coordination entre les intervenants en appui au développement  est aussi palpable même quand ils relèvent dumême ministère, ceci est vraiment un défi manifeste.

 Ce déficit decoordination est aussi « ressenti », pas seulement au niveau des structures del’Etat, mais aussi au niveau des intervenants en général. Il n’existe,apparemment, aucune organisation ou structure nationale pour fédérer ouorganiser des rencontres d’information, de coordination ou de « mise à jour »d’intervenants divers. Les représentants des collectivités territoriales  et ceux de la SC se plaignent de la manièredont ils sont parfois traités par les autorités nationales. Cette absence oudéficit de stratégie de coordination en ce qui concerne les programmes ouprojets de développement rend difficile la coordination au sein de l’administrationet entre l’administration et les bailleurs de fonds.

Le niveau de formationet des cadres étatiques  en général, esttrès bas. Les connaissances des textes et conventions  (en particulier les grande orientations ODD)  leur capacités de négociation ainsi quel’application des conventions est très insuffisante. Ces différentes  contraintes auront un effet  un  « ralentissement» du processus de déclenchement du Programme National de Développement Durableet va sans nul doute  freiner lesdynamiques naissantes d’appropriation des politiques et ODD sans une impulsiondes Nations Unies, d’où le besoin d’un représentant pays du FPHN qui doitveiller à l’esprit de la résolution de l'ONU qui a adopté l'ordre du jour 2030(A / RES / 70/1) stipule que «les pays et toutes les parties prenantes,agissant en partenariat de collaboration, mettront en œuvre ce plan"(Transformer notre monde : l'Agenda 2030 pour le développement durable). Ilveillera à l’aspect d’«Assurer à tous les niveaux sensibles, inclusive,participative et représentative de prise de décision". 

2016-03-07 17:21 GMT+00:00 <notification@unteamworks.org>:

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E-discussion Facilitator

Merci pour votre commentaire. Outre de la nomination d'un représentant au FPHN et d'investir dans la formation des fonctionnaires de l'Etat, qu'est-ce que vous croyez peut être fait pour surmonter le manque de coordination gouvernementale qui entrave la mise en œuvre des ODD?

Kader Lawaly

Pour surmonter le manque de coordination de l'action gouvernementale, il est nécessaire de créer des points focus groupes de travail sur plusieurs thématiques relatifs aux programmes de développement aux niveau de nos Etats. Cela contribuera mieux à centraliser les informations et à mieux les exploiter. Le Mercredi 16 mars 2016 17h46, "notification@unteamworks.org" <notification@unteamworks.org> a écrit :

E-discussion Facilitator

Hi Mustafa, thank you for your comment. Other participants in the forum also believe that participatory monitoring and evaluation mechanisms are important to ensure value for money and avoid duplication. Perhaps you could engage with them further to discuss other suggestions on how the SDGs could be effectively mainstreamed into relevant national sustainable development policies and programmes? Amarakoon, for instance, shares the following concrete suggestions:

 

Amarakoon Bandara AMARAKOON Economic Advisor, UNDP from ZimbabweThu, March 10, 2016 at 01.17 pm

As most development policies are implemented through national development plans, it is logical to mainstream SDGs through such plans and strategies. When the national development plans are already in place, an entry point could be annual work plans that are used as tools for the implementation of long term plans. UN could support this in two ways: first is to assist the governments in the design of such plans and strategies that are aligned to achieve SDGs in the long run. Secondly, UN could align its development assistance strategy, UNDAF, to achieve SDGs. Our experience suggest the need for improvement in the delivery of UNDAF outcomes in a more collaborative manner for better results even in countries where Delivering as One is operational. Such an approach not only enhance synergies among UN agencies but also avoid duplication for greater value for money. It is also important to ensure that national efforts to achieve SDGs are linked to the national budgetary process for greater development outcomes. Engagement with Parliamentarians on SDGs through outreach and support to the establishment of Parliamentary Committees on SDGs could help in this regard. In Zimbabwe, UNDP has supported the government in preparing a Zimbabwe Position Paper on SDGs that is linked to the national development plan and the Ten Point Plan of the President. An Acceleration Action Plan for SDG 2 has also been drafted in consultation with provincial level officials. A dialogue with Parliamentarians is planned for raising awareness on the role of Parliamentarians in advancing the SDG implementation process, how they could champion SDGs at the national level and taking SDGs to their respective constituencies.

The micro level implementation of national development policies and strategies will involve sub-national entities. Yet, in most developing countries such sub-national institutional arrangements are weak to undertake broader development initiatives such as the SDGs. Strengthening capacities for Sub-national planning and implementation would help deliver results on the ground. Building strong partnerships and collaboration with local authorities, especially when resource flows from the center to the local bodies are very limited, would be critical to make a difference in development outcomes. These partnerships could be more effective if it starts right from the beginning. Given the stronger role expected from the non-governmental sector in achieving SDGs, it is paramount to strengthen the partnership with all stakeholders, including donors, the private sector and the civil society.

Most countries are members of regional blocks, typically targeting cooperation towards strengthened economic development. This could be a window for peer exchange. An initiative to get regional blocks to discuss how they should cooperate to achieve the SDGs would allow them to explore such exchange. This is in fact nothing but part of a South-South/Triangular cooperation. We have seen an increase in SS/TC with positive effects on development in developing countries at low cost, but they tend to be isolated and negligible compared to the needs, especially in Africa. Although the UN provides support in promoting SS/TC, its focus is narrow moving away from central themes- trade and investment- where the majority of SS/TC opportunities exist. Expanding the scope of the SS/TC support mechanisms could be an attractive proposition for all stakeholders, more so for developing countries lagging behind in trade and investment.

Priscilla (not verified)

The SDGs being global indicators should be entrenched to the Regional bodies of which the various National states are members. These National level policies should be based on the Regional priorities, as this ensures closer follow up of actions in place, by a central organ. The UN, in that it has Regional offices should ensure these offices are linked to the Regional political administrative boundaries to for coherence and systematization of issues affecting the Region. Thus a UN Regional office should be aligned to a political Regional office to maximize the gains. The national level priorities in as much as possible should be towards the Regional goals unless for very specific issues which have no repercussion to the Region. I take the case of Burundi, as it has being mentioned below, the said conflict has an effect in the whole Region, thus it’s not only a Burundi issue, but a Regional one too and at the end may have an effect to the Regional economic growth .

A Regional approach should be sought after to enable the member states, the various organizations work towards a common closer, near home,  goal. I give an example of the Horn of Africa regional IGAD Drought Disaster Resilience Sustainability Initiative (IDDRSI- http://resilience.igad.int/)  of Ending Drought Emergencies,  the  8 Member countries of IGAD, have the country programming papers for this initiative(thus all countries are working towards a common goal and though all at different levels , the MS are all aware of what is required). This same initiative is supported by donors and international development partners, under the umbrella of the Global Alliance for Action for Drought Resilience and Growth, which was formed following the IDDRSI. The Global Alliance brings together relief and development actors and resources to take joint action in support of effective country-led plans, with an emphasis on building resilience and promoting economic growth in the Horn of Africa.  Though not yet there, having organizations meet for a common purpose is way in the right direction, and a clear partnership build for a clear common purpose. A regional approach, endorsed by the member states ,by itself is a motivation in that the states are too required to provide their progress, but this calls for a strong regional monitoring system to limit only state’s self-reporting. This is where I see the Regional UN supported by the national UN institutions added value to ensure equitable process in implementation and of ensuring strong accountable systems, which review the progress within a given time.  Thank you

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. Regional priorities jointly identified by countries facing similar issues could certainly further the achievement of SDGs. How do you believe the UN could support the process of defining regional priorities?

Jean de Dieu KAMANZI • Programme Assistant at UN Volunteers

Here is my say J

On question 1:

The governments can include SDGs where relevant in the national priorities.  The UNOSD can maybe technically help in this by screening the national priorities and then advising the governments on matching them with/linking them to the SDGs. Where the SDGs are not relevant to national priorities, they can be included in the UNDAF.

On question 2:

For least developed countries (most of African and Asian countries):

For so many years since independences, a lot of aid/assistance money has been pouring in to those countries but still, the poverty, poor infrastructure, armed conflicts, and a poor education continue to be tough obstacles to human development.

I think the key area that needs progress and capacity building is Good Governance: many things can be considered here but overall or at the national level, there is a need of effective policies, effective implementation, and efficient management/use of resources. Policies relate to anything that contributes to human development:  peace building, inclusive democracy, quality education for all, agriculture, environment, commerce, infrastructure, industry, health care, etc.

Partnership in capacity building should take place immediately in order to avail its contribution in the implementation of the SDGs without delay. It can be a multilateral (for e.g. between a government and the UN/UNOSD or NGOs) or bilateral (between a government and another government which can provide a technical support or advisory services on capacity building for sustainable development. The latter partnership should be endorsed/guided by the UNOSD to ensure consistency/relevance with the SDGs.

On question 3:

I think networking is a big enabler of this. Technology can be used to network in order to share and to coordinate information, expertise, and experiences. People can interact in SDGs thematic forums, there can be mentoring exchange between peer experts, etc.  For example, SDGs thematic experts from developed countries can mentor their counterparts from developing/poor countries, there can be programmes through which youth immigrants from poor countries who live and have studied/worked in developed countries can transfer knowledge to their countries of origin, etc. At UNV there used to be something called TOKTEN (Transfer of Knowledge Through Expatriate Nationals). Maybe it can help at this time around.

There can be SDGs national thematic committees/forums which collect information from all social classes/groups, refine it and synthesize it based on the concerned SDG, and then share it on the e-spaces or face to face workshops/conferences.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. SDG 16 covers some of the issues you brought up , specially those related to peace and good governance. In what regards partnerships for development, do you have any thoughts on how to actively engage civil society, the private sector and the governments in the SDGs national thematic committees/forums you propose?

Jean de Dieu KAMANZI • Programme Assistant at UN Volunteers

I think there are different scenarios here but one could be that a forum be coordinated from an authority’s office (president, prime minister, or a minister). Then a message could be sent out through different channels/means so that interested civil society groups, private sector members and government members/services can join and provide their inputs. An e-forum can be created by the coordinating office which would also moderate the discussions and synthetize the information – just the way it is happening on this space. Physical meetings/workshops could also be held so that the e-forum participants can discuss the guidelines, timelines, and progresses.

Moa Westman • Regional Programme Adviser at UNDP-UNEP Poverty-Environment Initiative

The joint UNDP-UNEP Poverty-Environment Initiative (UNDP-UNEP PEI) is an innovative programme providing practical approaches and tools for mainstreaming sustainable development. Close to 30 governments in Africa, Asia-Pacific, Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States and Latin America and the Caribbean have, with support from the UNDP-UNEP PEI during the past decade, already started examining the interconnections between poverty, environment and development, the so-called poverty-environment nexus, and explored new ways of how to address these challenges through an integrated approach. UNDP-UNEP PEI does so by adapting its poverty-environment mainstreaming approach to specific national and subnational contexts. UNDP-UNEP PEI assists governments in mainstreaming sustainable development into national policies, plans and budget frameworks), and by building of capacity to implement those policies/plans.

The case of Mozambique provides a good example of how the Government has adopted an integrated approach to policy-making including tools and approaches used for operationalizing an integrated approach at different levels. Embarking on an integrated approach to sustainable development is crucial for a country like Mozambique. The welfare of Mozambique’s population, the country’s economic growth and the achievement of development and poverty reduction goals depend to a large extent on the sustainable use of natural resources. Nationwide over 82% of jobs depend on natural resources and it is estimated that natural capital contributes up to 50% of Mozambique’s GDP (MICOA and PEI, Environmental Economic Analysis of Natural Resource Management, Mozambique, 2012). 

However, unsustainable use is undermining the social and economic benefits derived from natural capital. An economic valuation of natural resources commissioned by the former Ministry of Environment Coordination Affairs (MICOA) supported by the UNDP-UNEP PEI showed that the yearly economic loss due to environmental degradation and the inefficient use of natural resources in Mozambique is equal to 17% of GDP. By contrast, the estimated cost to remediate these damages was calculated at 9 % of GDP. Yet, in a separate study reviewing the level of public environmental expenditure, it was revealed that expenditure on environment was equivalent to only 1.4% of GDP – that is, expenditure is far below what would be justified on economic terms alone.

Such economic paradoxes go to the very core of the sustainable development problem and the interlinkages between social, environmental and economic aspects. The Government is determined to achieve inclusive sustainable development by adopting an integrated cross-sectorial approach to development planning and budgeting. In 2011 the former Ministry of Planning and Development with support of the UNDP-UNEP PEI and the Danish International Development Agency adopted a mainstreaming matrix for cross-cutting issues including environment and gender. The mainstreaming matrix now serves as an important tool to ensure that sector plans and budgets include objectives that aim to promote inclusive sustainable use of natural resources. MICOA has played an instrumental role in operationalizing the mainstreaming matrix and supporting sector ministries to appoint environmental focal points within their own ministries. As a result of the cross-sector collaboration between MICOA and the Ministry of Planning and Development, for the first time nine sector social and economic plans integrate poverty-environment objectives. 

In 2013 MICOA used the economic findings from the above mentioned studies to lobby for the appointment of environmental focal points within the Ministry of Finance. Three environmental focal points in the Ministry of Finance are championing the inclusion of environmental sustainability objectives in Mozambique’s budget processes. In 2014 a budget code for climate change was introduced which will help track climate change expenditure and monitor sectors commitments to address climate change. The two ministries are further collaborating on the review of community benefit sharing mechanisms in the gas, forestry and mining sectors.

In 2015 the Government of Mozambique adopted a new five year development plan (PQG) 2015-2019. One of the five priority areas in the PQG focuses on the sustainable and transparent use of environment and natural resources and includes an explicit focus on reducing local communities’ vulnerabilities to climate change and environmental degradation and transitioning to a green-blue economy. The Government further allocated 13.6% (23,779 million MET/approximately $500,000) of the total 2015 PQG budget for the implementation of the priority area. 

Increasing investment in the sustainable use of the environment and natural resources not only has a positive impact on environmental quality but also helps reduce poverty and contribute to economic growth. In the province of Zambezia where riverbank erosion is a major problem, the adoption of ecosystem based approaches has prevented community relocations and people are now able to concentrate on income generating activities inspired by sustainable agriculture practices. Providing the right support to communities and local governments to deal with environmental degradation but also to benefit from extraction of natural resources is essential to sustain livelihoods and ensure food security.

The example of Mozambique demonstrates how an integrated approach to social, economic and environmental sustainability requires capacity building and cross-sector government coordination with ministries of planning and finance providing the overall leadership. The case also demonstrates the catalytic role that the UN and other development partners can play in stimulating integrated approaches by providing evidence and supporting the development of mainstreaming tools, thereby grounding poverty-environment mainstreaming in practice. Such a cross-sectorial integrated approach will be essential for the successful implementation at national and subnational level of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.  

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for you comment. Your example highlights the role that UN can play in providing support to mainstreaming the SDGs into national policy (by providing evidence and supporting the development of mainstreaming tools). Could you tell us more about how the Mozambican government was able to overcome the difficulties often faced by national governments in what regards cross-sector coordination?

Melaku Geleta Wakjira (not verified)

National Implementation

Dear Moderator,

This is very useful platform to the UNECOSOC & UNDP to get global reflections towards the UN global support in the context of a ground and national realities. I believe, within these contexts, practical examples would be forwarded in order to address the subject under discussions. My commentary and advices are spinning around such perspectives. Thank you very much for this early stage chances and e-discussions which I think are critically important to influence the SDG’s 2016-2030 directions.    

A Point from Moderator: How can the SDGs be effectively mainstreamed into relevant national sustainable development policies and programmes, while preserving countries' policy space to pursue national priorities? How can the UN development system best support this?

 

  1. We have to be very clear on a common ground should exist between countries national plan and the UN SDG’s, i.e. how each countries define SDG’s from their national sustainable development goal perspective is critically important. It is clear that the SDG’s crafted with full participation UN member states. It is clear that the finally approved SDG’s endorsed by full participation of all member states. In order to effectively defining the roles of the UN in due courses of SDG implementation, we have to go out from businesses as usual approach. We have to ask key questions. Such as, what are the countries development models are focusing on? Growth model at work are dealing with? How relevant are they for SDG’s? Such questions have to be asked & get proper answers before go to SDG’s implementations. The UN country programs must come up with a transformative operational strategy as well to compliment the national plan. And the UN country programs should propose innovative solutions for unfinished MDG businesses and transformative, new social, economic and political direction compatible to the 15 years ambitious global development goal. Countries must be prepared to see 360° in to their national policies, strategies and detail action plans emanated from the growth and development model they owned at UN general assembly. I proceed to my comments from these angles. 

 

  • For example “Ending extreme poverty in all forms by 2030” is a very broad goal. This would be achieved mainly through having vibrant development model, inclusive by its approach, nondiscriminatory by its applications, multicultural by its nature. Above all, it has to address all strides of human life. It has to be very sensitive for invisible class formation related risks. As some studies indicate, the implementation of the MDG has affected some community groups. In some areas there were differences between the qualitative and quantitative achievements of the MDG. In fact the realty was varying from country to countries, from continent to continents. This time countries must work for the qualitative levels of achievements. We have to be very clear that there is a big difference between ending poverty and ending extreme poverty. The extreme poverty is all about the fulfillments of three basic needs, food, shelter and closing. It is the country’s development model that would determine the achievements of these needs. This is primarily an assignment for African and Asian continents. The challenges with these two continents are mainly related to absences of good governess, democratic governments, employment opportunities, corruptions and peace and security. A country under such stranded condition can’t deliver in qualitative term on SDG’s. One has to note that, the remaining 17 SDG’s are extensions for the achievements of “Ending extreme poverty in all forms by 2030”.   

 

  • If we look in to the second goal, it is all about “Ending hunger, achieve food security, improve nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture” This is very basic goal to transform a society to other levels of life. This goal is mainly focusing on a sector where countries GDP are coming from. Having sustainable agriculture is paramount importance to assure food security at country and household level. Because of so many structural and nonstructural problems, the agriculture sector in Africa, Latin America and Asia is becoming less resilient for seasonal shocks and disasters usually caused by climate changed. The climate change phenomenon is showing a continuum. Unless developed countries choose suitable development model, they will continue suffering from structure and nonstructural sectorial problems. The required emancipation for the sector fall on the shoulder of the type of economic model the country follows. The question must be raised is, are we in a visible food insecurity situation? Do our agriculture sector is resilient for climate change happening globally but affecting us locally? If the answers are yes for both fundamental questions, therefore, it is time for the countries (mainly for the developing & non industrial nations) to think about innovation and technology transfer need for the sector. This is basically important to bring both structural and nonstructural rapid changes. In addition, in the process of transiting from agrarian to industrial or agro industrial economy, the required human development must be considered. It is the quality of the human development packages can decide the yield of the sector. Therefore, ending hunger is the results of the balance between the supply and demand parts including the surplus production must be available at national level. In this case the purchasing power of the society has to be significantly improved in order to stimulate local markets and purchasing power of the society.  The multi-faceted achievements of the sector, such as improved food security, improved agriculture and improved nutrition are possible if the agriculture sector structural and nonstructural problems are well addressed under the growth and development model of that specific country.  Countries like Latin America, Africa and Asia must work hard to transform the sector to other levels of achievements. These nations must look back. They have to conduct qualitative assessments to see all achieved developments of the sector. This is the age of climate change. The sustainability of the agriculture sector by far becoming out of human hand.  Especially for developing countries the challenge is a triple fold. Hence, national level SDG’s implementation means for the sector is all about how to address the need for food security at household levels. In this regards, to this sector the issues of natural resources governance,  inclusive developments and land use & management policies are critical areas has to be addressed under 2016-2030 SDG’ implementation. The need for land for commercial faming versus problems related potentially poor community members, marginalization’s needs to be carefully consider. The national land use strategy is critically important in order to promote sustainable agriculture under agriculture, agro-pastoralist and pastoralist livelihood contexts. Especially this is recommendable for agrarian society who are getting more than 50% of GDP. 

 

  • The health sector was another broad focus area for the year 2016-2030 SDG.  It is widely believed that a society free from extreme poverty with sustainable income is usually had standard heath care services and insurances. Such thinking seems outdated & needs to be re-revised according the changing socio- economic situations of the world. In this case governments are primarily responsible bodies to provide there people a standard health care & health insurances services. Regardless of the society economic and social strata, citizens should be granted appropriate health care services. This must be taken as one aspect of citizenry rights. When we say standard health services, it has to cover all ranges of human life cycle, including pregnant mothers and children in their mother wombs too. The role the government must be focused on how to insure equity in the process of resource distribution and allocation to the sectors across all levels of societal classes. There is no ways for citizens to get standard and basic health services where the social and economic gaps are broaden year after year unless the government commitments are significantly enhanced during the SDG implementation years. As indicated under the overall SDG’s, “assuring good health is all about health life and promotion of well- being to all at all levels”. In this case, the goal will be achieved only through huge investment for the health sector. The investment would ranges from infrastructure expansions to human resource development including assuring high levels public participation in the fields of health extension and promotion.   

 

  • Similar to the above SDG’s there are detail and strategic areas require attentions for the education sector, countries should go beyond a mere language saying national education program coverage. This time the education policy of each UN member countries should focus on; Provision of quality education at primary, secondary, tertiary, college and vocational centers. The education policy must focus on how to go beyond national capacity building. The possibility to export trained and competent professionals to other nations with limited human capacity is new areas of opportunity to the sector. The education sector future strategy must focus on attaining professional Excellency; promote innovations and trans-boundary researches where finally investment in education sector would be considered as international business. This would bring the importance of transnational alliances and corporations to bring expected Excellency in the sector. If education policy and strategy working on this directions, issues of unemployment will significantly reduce. Because the global workforce and demand is still unbalanced. In addition to the above points, because of the absence of qualified and trained workforces everywhere in our planet, very simple challenges are sustaining without being solved. As a result the responsibility of this sector is becoming critical towards achieving the SDG’s during 2016-2030.

 

  • The education policy and strategy that we mentioned above has to be designed in a way the education system and the curriculum would empower women for a batter contribution to the global economy & aspired world. The attitude of seeing women empowerment as only for women benefit must be changed. We have to accept that they have critical contribution in changing our world, shaping the future & above all promoting the untapped skills and potentials for innovation and change. I most cases these were undermined for so many centuries. If we proud for what we have achieved to this date, i.e. in the absences  of women participation or biased gender understanding or  ascribed roles, this time we must explore the unexplored on for our betterment. The need for gender equity begin with the education system, grow to the employment and work sector, proceed to social, economic and political fields.

 

  • The issues of provisions of clean water and sanitation should not continue as an issue of simple service provisions. Under this goal each countries national plan should clearly indicate the meaning of access, affordability & quality water from practical and technical point of views. The goal for this sector for 2016-2030 should show to what extent governments are committed to assure the provision of access, affordable & quality water to their nations. Undisclosed reports from the past MDG’s shows that most of the developing countries were reporting achievements on access for water indiscriminately as for affordability and quality. However, that was not the realty. As this sector is a critical sector for achievements of most the SDG’s, governments should take appropriate measures to allocate significant investment for affordable & quality water access.  In addition, it is clear that the development pace of all nations may not be on the same page at same levels. In some cases, the development in the urban areas different from what has been achieved the rural areas. In some cases, the development in agriculture livelihood context exceed from what has been achieved in the pastoralists and agro-pastoralist contexts. Given these and similar other preconditions, government’s strategy and plan for affordable and quality water access must be free from systematic and unnoticed marginalization. On similar stances, the issues of access, affordability and reliability can be discussed under energy sector.  In the provisions of these basic services we should make sure that any parts of the nation are not discriminated and left behind from the national benefits. The governances system recommended for the remaining sectors should be considered for the water and energy sector too. Governments should notice that, unless a resource allocation & national and local level investments for the energy and water sector are based on the principles of resource equity, the life standard discrepancies between livelihoods, economic classes, and geographical locations will remain as it is throughout 2016-2030. 

 

  • We can summaries about the rest of SDG’s as follows. In general, the practical implementation of the ambitious SDG 2016-2030 is in the hands of world leader in general, each nation in particular. The commitment time is already passed. Now actions are started. Each country needs to be very honest about the future of its nation in particular and our world in general. There are times where we are sharing collective responsibilities. There are times where we are individually accountable for our actions. Both individual and collective accountabilities are applied interchangeably as required as needed in the entire implementation time of the SDG’s. Most of the developing nations are implementing their national development plan through FDI and development aids. The implementation of SDG’s requiring huge financing. This would be covered from own resources, development aids, loan from financial institutions and bilateral governments supports and sometimes from humanitarian assistances. If governments failed to properly plan appropriate national strategies, polices and plans, they obviously have planned to fail. In this regards the following critical points needs to be examined in the due courses of the implementation of SDG’s;

 

  1. All national plans, strategies and programs must be emanated from the democratic governance principles i.e. by the people, for the people & with the people. In other words, they have to respect human rights; human dignity ultimately should work for human development and decent life on our planet. 

 

  1. Corruption and good governances are the two most important elements to be considered for the success of SDG’s 2016-2030. If a country is well known for corruption no way to deliver on SDG’s. I am mentioning multifaceted types of corruption. Corruption is not only taking public resources, the most dangers one it will get power for  false report production usually  misleading  the others. Hence, in the absences of good governance, there is no guarantee if the resources allocated for SDG’s is used for the unintended purposes and again no way to check the credibility of the delivery. If a system based corruption existing, it is very difficult to fight it. Therefore, the importance of good governance is mandatory to deliver on SDG’s accountably, responsibly with shared responsibility and controlled system.

 

  1. Countries must be clear about the development model they have at national level. They have to make sure if their national development plan is in line with all UN declarations, principles, their national laws, sub-regional and continental agreements & protocols. They have to carefully refer these all international and national covenants while developing or adopting any development models. These international, national and regional documents are prepared to make sure collective and individual accountabilities are met. The documents are referring what must be done and do not. They are giving directions on how to realize a safe world or contribute towards safe world. The documents are human centered, nature centered, equity centered, standard centered, quality centered, principle centered, law centered, politics centered, culture centered, economy centered, protection centered, quality centered, peace and security centered etc. It talks about today, forewarn about tomorrow and envisage for the future.  The ultimate goal of SDG’s is” no one left behind”. If our development model serving some part of the nation and affecting the others, or deviate from the principles of inclusive development, no way to deliver on SDG’S. A sustainable development will examine all contexts. SDG’s are predestined to the principles of sustainability.                       

 

A point from Moderator: What are key areas for making progress on and building national and sub-national capacities for sustainable development, and how do they differ across country contexts (e.g. least developed countries, middle income countries, high-income countries, countries in situations of fragility etc.)? When and how can partnerships effectively contribute to capacity building and sustainable development?

  • One of the UN expert level supports to the member states is building of the national capacity of a member states for program execution. The implementation of the 17 SDG’s goals is requiring professional,   technical, financial, and thematic and program supports from the UN. To me by now all UN agencies should finish the preparation of specialty areas capacity building packages for SDG’s execution. If not yet, this must be prepared in the coming months or years. It is this support that keeps a balance between UN and member states in the entire SDG’s implementation life time. During the preparation of the capacity bundling packages, it would have been very good if all UN documents thoroughly referred to set standards, qualities, measurements, procedures, rules and regulations in line SDG’s thematic areas (declaration, standards, protocols, principles etc.). This would help to put UN at the position of a partner of choice. In additions, these will help to the UN to look beyond the conventional and traditional delivery realm.  As capacity building work is not one time work, through peer reviewing process, joint learning opportunities, there will be a room for periodical capacity gap identification to take a required action.     

 

A point from Moderator: What steps are necessary to ensure that all stakeholders, including the government, private sector and civil society can readily exchange information and experiences? How can "peer exchange" be established and nurtured?

  • As I already indicated above, the UN must go from traditional and conventional delivery focused program exclusion approach. In most cases the UN is shying away to comment the weakness of governments in development program implementation and other related business. It is widely heard that the UN would like to operate within safe zone. Some times reports are prepared to maintain such status quo. This tradition needs to be changed.
  • The governments are expecting the UN to serve as a “surrogate mother”. It is wrongly understood that UN is there to provide service with no right to question or to say no. This is totally against partnership principle for mutual accountability & for common goal.
  • The role of a private sector, civil society organizations engagements on UN-Government national program was significantly undermined in the past. It looks like UN and governments are playing on one side and the private sector & CSO are on the other side. 

 

  • In order to improve these challenges & for a better SDG’s implementation, the role and responsibilities of each sectors must be defined. The participation of the CSO and private sector is very decisive. Hence, to the interest of the implementation of SDG’s, to jointly monitor on its achievements and to periodically follow up on the  possible challenges , the establishments of peer reviewing platform is very important. Country offices should initiate the establishments of such platforms to start to exercise a joint SDG’s implementation monitoring in the coming years where they can capitalize and taping learning and experiences.       
E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comprehensive contribution. In what regards knowledge and experience sharing, what do you think could be done to ensure that all stakeholders (UN, government, private sector and CSO) engage in the joint monitoring of SDGs achievements?

E-discussion Facilitator

Hi Melaku, thank you for your comment. Many participants in this discussion also believe that corruption is a significant challenge to effectively mainstreaming the SDGs in national sustainable development policies in low, middle and high-income countries alike. Perhaps you can engage with them further to discuss other concrete suggestions on how to eliminate corruption and promote good governance in national sustainable development policies and programmes? Akaash for instance, shares the following ideas:

 

Akaash Maharaj GOPAC Chief Executive from CanadaThu, March 3, 2016 at 03.26 am

GOPAC -- the Global Organization of Parliamentarians Against Corruption -- strongly supports the Sustainable Development Goals, and believes that Goal 16 in particular correctly identifies the imperative for the nations of the world to combat corruption, as a critical means of achieving social and economic development.The UN Development Programme has estimated that the developing world loses €10 to corruption for every €1 it receives in official aid.  Moreover, GOPAC estimates that corruption now kills more people across the world than war and famine combined. No matter what else the international community may do, we will simply not achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, unless we are able to significantly contain and reduce corruption in public institutions.GOPAC’s research has demonstrated conclusively that – across all regions, political systems, and cultures – strong parliaments are unambiguously correlated with reduced corruption, while weak parliaments are correlated with increased corruption.

By the very nature of their role, parliamentarians are the watchdogs of democracy, and it is tragic when citizens come accept their watchdogs muting their bark, muzzling their bite, or being neutered by the very powers they are meant to hold at bay.  Ultimately, effective parliamentary oversight is the single most effective component in the state system to discourage, detect, and defeat corruption.Our call is, therefore, simple to articulate, though often difficult to realise: to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, combatting corruption in public administration must be our first priority, and to succeed in that effort, we must cultivate and empower a vigilant, relentless, and fearless community of parliamentarians, to stand between our leaders and the levers of power.

 

Melaku Geleta Wakjira (not verified)

Holistic to specific corruption fighting
approach &strategy

By Melaku Geleta

DRR & LR Program
Coordinator

UNDP Ethiopia 

Dear facilitator and
Akaaash thank you very much for bringing  the issues of corruption to the seen which in
fact we all have raised in our past weeks discussions at comprehensive level .
I think we need to do more probing on this to deal with issues of corruption.
We need to sharpen our understanding on the subject for organized and effective
solutions. It is with this understanding that I am taking some steps to
elaborate the challenge and a remedial action.

General Recommendation to UN and its alliances
to stop corruption 2016-2030: If we are very determine to fight corruption; I suggest the UN
should think as early as possible (before SDG’s implementation) on how to bring
additional UN structure such as UN corruption court with global and
international mandate. UN must define international bill for corruption, set
international standard to measure its international impacts, code of conduct
for its management, above all needs to set international accountability
measures and check and balance system between governments, public sectors,
private sectors , CSO’s and the UN that must be approved by UN general
assembly. To me corruption is not less than genocide, international war crime,
etc. I suggest this because, corrupters are taking public resources, smuggling
national resources to the third country, destroy national interests &
natural resources for narrow and private needs, they use this resources for
further human right abuses, where women are dying needs of clean and potable
water, where children are dying of malnutrition, where thousands are choosing
less dignified life standard because of unemployment, poor governances. It
causes civil unrest. Hence UN should think of new structure, International
corruption court
. We need the general assembly to be active in
these areas.

In addition to what I
have recommended above, the UN should provide a chance to the international
organizations or CSO’s to have a role that they can play beyond conventional consultation
process. As to me, these organizations should be given a defined role to fight
corruption internationally and globally. I am sure this will bring additional
power to the UN to stop corruption in the coming years, SDG’s 2016-2013.The
system and a framework that applied on how the CSO’s play a role needs to be
defined and approved by UN general assembly. The structure suggested should go
down to UN country offices, but must be deigned on how to compliment the
international corruption court role at global level including corruption
reporting systems.

By Melaku Geleta

DRR & LR Program
Coordinator

UNDP Ethiopia  

Date: Wed, 16 Mar 2016 00:56:26 +0000To: melaku_geleta@hotmail.comFrom: notification@unteamworks.orgSubject: [Teamworks] E-discussion Facilitator from Canada commented on the Discussion "National Implementation"Yo

Rita Luthra

Better information helps us to make better decisions. Investing in wireless Internet technology is the way forward to tackle maternal mortality and morbidity in the developing countries. E-learning is the most cost-effective way of transmitting evidence-based medicine to the developing countries. Imagine sitting in office or at home in USA or Europe, and by interacting with different cultures we will be able to understand different customs and learn to respect the diversity. Imagine students in developing countries and the United States simultaneously reviewing the same medical curriculum and learning from each other. This is e-learning at its best in an Internet classroom, and it is the goal of our initiative in Women’s Health and Development, title: http://www.WomensHealthSection.com; which was launched in collaboration with the United Nations is serving about 14 million subscribers in 227 countries and it is available in six official languages of the United Nations.

 

It is indeed my pleasure to submit to you UN Documents E/2015/NGO/2 and E/2014/NGO/53

Over the years, the United Nations, governments, civil societies, and individuals have put forth countless plans of action for reducing maternal mortality and morbidity. According to the World Health Organization, at least 1,600 women will die today from a complication of pregnancy and childbirth, most of them in developing countries. No technical or political approach – no matter how well intentioned – has ever conquered this enormous problem. What is needed is broader dissemination of medical knowledge. And Internet classrooms and initiatives such as WomensHealthSection.com, can help that goal.

 

Please join our efforts; we welcome everyone.

 

Thank you for this opportunity

Rita Luthra, MD

President

Women's Health and Education Center (WHEC)

NGO in Special Consultative Status with ECOSOC of the United Nations

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. The Internet has indeed shown to be a cost-effective way of disseminating knowledge. Could you tell us more about your experience on how to engage such a broad spectrum of people in sharing their knowledge and experience? What are the main challenges and how to suscesfully face them?

E-discussion Facilitator

WEEK 1 (29 February – March 6, 2016) – Report Summary 

 

Thanks to all participants in this e-discussion for your insightful contributions! It has been little over a week since we launched this dynamic discussion. Below is a summary of the key points made:

 1.     How can the SDGs be effectively mainstreamed into relevant national sustainable development policies and programmes, while preserving countries' policy space to pursue national priorities? How can the UN development system best support this?

Overall, participants provided a wide range of suggestions on how to effectively mainstream the SDGs into national sustainable development policies and programmes, including:

-        Developing strong legal frameworks: A review of current legal frameworks would serve to identify any frameworks that are outdated or unaligned with the 2030 Agenda and would enable the creation of a centralized database that would house national and subnational legislation frameworks for use by member states. In Brazil, for instance, a similar review revealed the lack of adherence to the Agenda 21 of numerous national, provincial and municipal planning frameworks.

-        Strategic timing: Ensuring that SDGs are embedded in key national planning activities right from the get go. Incorporating the SDGs in the development of national and local plans during the early stages is a very effective means to promoting sustainable development. In Tanzania for instance, the development of key national planning activities coincided with UN’s release of the SDGs. As a result, Tanzania’s Five Year Development Plan (2016/17 – 2020/21) focuses on economic transformation and human development, in line with sustainable development goals. Similarly Ethiopia’s national Growth and Transformation Plan (2016-2020) was developed to align with the SDGs.

-        Differentiation: the best way to preserve countries' policy space to pursue national priorities while mainstreaming the SDGs is to allow for the prioritization of different SDGs based on national contexts and development levels. Participatory monitoring and accountability processes embedded in national development policies and programmes ensure that countries will pursue appropriate national priorities in line with SDGs.

-        The 2030 Agenda was set through broad consultations with main stakeholder worldwide, which already helped to raise awareness and promote the inclusion of the SDGs on discussions of development strategies at the national level.

-        National implementation of the SDGs could benefit from tapping into knowledge and expertise that is already available within the countries by not only engaging local stakeholders (such as on organizations, communities, associations and individuals), but also through the dissemination of MDGs and SDGs best practices.

-        The 2030 Agenda could also profit from coordinating international assistance funding and also aligning global or multilateral trade and investment agreements with the SDGs.

Participants suggest the UN system could assist member states mainstream SDGs by:

-        The United Nations can support the mainstreaming of the SDGs into national strategies in multiple ways, such as: suggesting coordinating institutional arrangements for SDGs implementation and monitoring; analyzing and promoting SDG's adherence to national development policies and programmes; monitoring and disseminating progress; facilitating knowledge sharing within and among countries; and guiding country members in their planning and budgeting processes.

-        Providing the technology needed to enable information exchange, including on national plans, annual budgets and progress integrating global, national and subnational development plans.

-        Conducting a gap analysis of the data requirements needed to monitor progress achieved, including a review of current development frameworks, SDGs and associated targets, in order to highlight high impact interventions. High impact interventions could be interventions that achieve multiple goals and targets concurrently, that result in structural transformation while achieving human development outcomes, that prioritize strategic goals, strengthen M&E systems and evidence-based policy-making, that provide alternative financing mechanisms and that scale up successful MDG interventions.

-        Access to reliable data for policy formulation and the elaboration of monitoring and evaluation committees and/or frameworks can help countries keep track of their progress and also provide stakeholders with additional information to push for the incorporation of the SDGs into national development policies.

-        The UN could also help national governments to identify legal frameworks out-dated in concept or incoherent with principles, goals and means of implementation of the SDGs.

-        In countries facing conflict or post-conflict situations, and also in least developed countries, the UN could take on a more active role in guiding the peace building process and on supporting the reestablishment of good governance and basic civil and political rights.

Some challenges to effectively mainstreaming the SDGs into relevant national sustainable development policies and programmes are:

-        Corruption in least developed, middle and high-income countries alike.

-        Lack of effective tools to gauge progress and inform policy and program development. For instance, lack of data on gender indicators to inform macroeconomic planning, resource allocation and policies hampers Ethiopia’s commitment to promote gender equality. Increased access to reliable quantitative and qualitative data is seen as essential for the development of appropriate and effective national and sub-national economic and social policies.

 2.     What are key areas for making progress on and building national and sub-national capacities for sustainable development, and how do they differ across country contexts (e.g. least developed countries, middle income countries, high-income countries, countries in situations of fragility etc.)? When and how can partnerships effectively contribute to capacity building and sustainable development?

Some key area for making progress on and building national and sub-national capacities for sustainable development are:

-        Gender empowerment in education, job creation, skill building, quality, accessible and affordable childcare, political and economic participation. Participant from Nigeria argued for women to have quality jobs, and more opportunities in education and high skill job transfer, as it will lead to their empowerment and economic inclusion, with positive development spillovers to the individual, family and society.

-        Environment and climate action: improving access to technologies in addressing climate change is necessary for countries.

-        Youth and education:  Participants made calls to increase educational attainment of girls and made calls for further education investments in teaching national and local languages, as well as the need to reach and use indigenous knowledge.

-        Job creation and rural sector development policies are necessary interventions for poverty reduction efforts.

-        Basic infrastructure for health, including clean water, access to water and sanitation: a participant from Liberia explained how the Ebola virus disease emphasized the need for the international community to work together to improve health care facilities and build the capacity of health care workers.

-        Good governance and freedom of expression: Burundi example given, post conflict efforts highlights need for free and peaceful societies committed to the development of the country.

-        Capacity building in internal planning and budgeting becomes an essential issue to be supported by development partners. Also, improving governance and designing monitoring and evaluation systems will be necessary in countries where access to data and results-based programming are limited.

Open conflict (including civil war) and the presence of IDPs and refugees in countries in situations of fragility impede sustainable development. In such contexts, the available national and sub-national capacity, including foreign aid, is used to provide immediate relief. For instance, Sudan found it challenging to make progress towards meeting the MDGs and will likely encounter similar challenges on the SDGs. Corruption is another obstacle to sustainable development around the globe. The Global Organization of Parliamentarians Against Corruption (GOPAC) estimates that corruption now kills more people across the world than war and famine combined. Therefore, paying proper attention to SDG target 16.5 will not only decrease the costs of implementing the 2030 Agenda but also contribute to achieving many, if not all, of the other SDGs.

In Least Developed Countries, special attention should be given to improving health care facilities and building the capacity of health care workers, otherwise preventable diseases will continue to claim lives and negatively affect sustainable development efforts. Access to water and sanitation is still a problem in both least developed and middle-income countries where the limited access to adequate services infringes on human safety and dignity, causes preventable deaths and even increases the risk of sexual violence due to lack of private toilet facilities. In middle-income countries, achieving sustainable growth is still a challenge that affects job creation and hinders poverty reduction.       

Participants highlighted the following types of partnerships as most effective to building capacity and promoting sustainable development:

-        Partnerships based on community mobilization.

-        Strategic partnerships with well-known local NGOs, with a strong presence on the ground.

-        International institutions (governmental or otherwise) should partner with local, reputable counterparts, preferably with aligning missions.

-        Partnerships with organizations with strong connections to the indigenous populations and local communities. The development of indigenous peoples should not be left aside, especially in countries where they make for most of the population, but also in those where they are a minority with little access to decision-making instances. Furthermore, international community must recognize the role of local leadership in promoting both awareness and ownership in what regards the SDGs. Community mobilization is necessary and should be seen as a key in the implementation and achievement of the 2030 Agenda at the local level.

-        Partnerships with customary, religious or opinion community leaders.

-        Take into account distinctive cultural characteristics and to adapt awareness and capacity-building materials to local languages so promotion of SDGs at the national and local level can be best internalized.

-        Effective partnerships stem from a shared but also complementary knowledge base, sufficient funding and resources.

-        Coordinating action at the local levels is necessary to avoid wasting resources or concentrating efforts on areas that are already well served by public services.

-        International community and global partners when combating climate change should support countries and national efforts, as this is a global problem.

 3.     What steps are necessary to ensure that all stakeholders, including the government, private sector and civil society can readily exchange information and experiences? How can "peer exchange" be established and nurtured?

Many participants expressed their desire to see a higher degree of collaboration and cooperation to achieve the ambitious SDGs.

ICTs will play an essential role in transposing obstacles for training, information and data sharing. International and national platforms (web/application based information systems), designed as social networks, could foster information exchange and partnership building. Some attribute existent and past gaps in awareness and coherence to lack of access to reliable data and sufficient IT technological capacity and suggest that information and communication technologies (ICT) could eliminate barriers to information and data sharing and could stimulate social engagement. Investment in Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) can accelerate the achievement of internationally agreed development goals, including the SDGs.

Knowledge databases could provide the dissemination of best practices and encourage cooperation. ICTs can also support participatory monitoring and accountability by providing open and easy transparent platform of country-by-country national plans and budgets, as well as subnational arrangements for integration of global, national and subnational plans.

Enhancing analytical capabilities by developing global databases of:

-        National sustainable development strategies and implementation tools: Such a platform would allow member states to share national and regional experiences, lessons learned and best practices.

-        Performance measurement (and tools) / key performance indicator frameworks: access to reliable data for policy and program development is important to effectively implement SDGs in national contexts. The development of strong performance measurement frameworks is recommended to enable individual countries to measure their progress against baselines and set realistic and achievable targets.

-        Specific analytics tools: data streams; multi-view dashboards; info-graphics on progress; social network platforms.

Thura Aung • Executive Director at Radanar Ayar Association from Myanmar [Burma]

Most of country from developing world especially in Asia and the Pacific, my region still weak for the National level implementation and means. I may request and call to UN For strong support

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. From your experience, what are key areas for making progress on and building national and sub-national capacities for sustainable development and how do they differ across countries in the Asia and the Pacific region? How can the UN development system best support this?

Ramit Basu • Independent Development Sector Consultant at Not affiliated to any organization from India

 

For successful national implementation, there has to be successful and robust local level implementation. This will call for National and Provincial Governments to devolve appropriate resources, manpower and authority to the decentralized local governments at the rural, semi-rural and urban areas as is mandated by either the Constitution or an Act of Parliament.

Local Governments are elected by the local population and hence should be made to fulfill the mandate of the later for which the former need to be adequately empowered. Many countries despite of having a decentralized system of governance apart from a Federal structure shy away from devolving powers to the local bodies and stop short of issuing clear cut guidelines and orders regarding division of responsibilities between  the local and higher levels of Government. This results in wastage of resources, time, duplication and over emphasis on a handful of regions or communities at the cost of other and hence overall national level implementation suffers.

Another important tool is the local level participatory and integrated planning which ought to be done by the local bodies and later integrated as part of the larger district or provincial plans. A few countries including India had initiated this exercise which is a remarkable way of ensuring participation and ownership of the local population in the day to day development affairs. However line ministries which works in silos in most countries and where the biggest chunk of government funds are parked, rarely acknowledges such people oriented and rights based exercises. Most plans prepared with the help of people’s participation are poorly addressed / responded and at some places never addressed by line departments and individual parallel thematic plans are prepared without the consent of the people. This results in again delayed, poor implementation or duplication of efforts. Worst of all, this discourages communities and hence participation and ownership suffers badly.

National Governments ought to ensure that line ministries especially key line ministries related to social, human and economic development draw their plans from the local body plans and not otherwise. Funds to be allocated to local bodies accordingly apart from untied funds for effective and all round implementation.

UN agencies can play a vital role in this by setting an example wherein they and their partner organizations prepares their respective plans in consultation with local communities and decentralized governments in rural and urban areas. There need to be a paradigm shift in UN agencies which should first recognize and appreciate the Constitutionality and Legal force behind the local organizations to send a message to other agencies and the Government to follow suit. Parallel efforts not taking into account the importance and indispensability of the local government will result in unplanned, unsystematic an d scattered implementation.

National Governments at the central level, provincial level, district and sub-district level need to set up coordination mechanisms wherein all development agencies working in that particular unit of planning share their information and data with regard to their work on a mandatory basis. This should cover UN agencies as well. An efficient coordination, monitoring and facilitating mechanism between the Government and Non-Government development agencies can remove many biases, gaps and grey areas which otherwise impede free and fair implementation.

In terms of capacity development of national and sub-national entities, well a lot has been done so far by different development agencies under some or the other intervention. What is required is creation of an enabling fiscal and functional environment to deliver as a result of those capacity building initiatives. What is required is sensitization and incentivization of delivery mechanisms and personnel to align themselves with the needs, plans and decisions of local bodies as per the law and not to over ride mass sentiments.

Last but not the least UN agencies alongwith other development groups should on a continuous basis undertake orientation and capacity development of political representatives at all levels of government in a particular country. This should be with respect to pushing for more devolution and authority to local bodies (as laid down in the Constitution), improved understanding and ownership of bottom up people’s planning processes and framing of policies which are more rights based than mere philanthropy or charity oriented. 

Thank you.

Best wishes,

Ramit

 

 

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment, Ramint. From your experience, what are key areas for making progress on and building national and sub-national capacities for sustainable development and how can different levels of government best achieve cross-sector coordination?

Amarakoon Bandara AMARAKOON • Economics Advisor at UNDP

As most development policies are implemented through national development plans, it is logical to mainstream SDGs through such plans and strategies. When the national development plans are already in place, an entry point could be annual work plans that are used as tools for the implementation of long term plans. UN could support this in two ways: first is to assist the governments in the design of such plans and strategies that are aligned to achieve SDGs in the long run. Secondly, UN could align its development assistance strategy, UNDAF, to achieve SDGs. Our experience suggest the need for improvement in the delivery of UNDAF outcomes in a more collaborative manner for better results even in countries where Delivering as One is operational. Such an approach not only enhance synergies among UN agencies but also avoid duplication for greater value for money. It is also important to ensure that national efforts to achieve SDGs are linked to the national budgetary process for greater development outcomes. Engagement with Parliamentarians on SDGs through outreach and support to the establishment of Parliamentary Committees on SDGs could help in this regard. In Zimbabwe, UNDP has supported the government in preparing a Zimbabwe Position Paper on SDGs that is linked to the national development plan and the Ten Point Plan of the President. An Acceleration Action Plan for SDG 2 has also been drafted in consultation with provincial level officials. A dialogue with Parliamentarians is planned for raising awareness on the role of Parliamentarians in advancing the SDG implementation process, how they could champion SDGs at the national level and taking SDGs to their respective constituencies.

The micro level implementation of national development policies and strategies will involve sub-national entities. Yet, in most developing countries such sub-national institutional arrangements are weak to undertake broader development initiatives such as the SDGs. Strengthening capacities for Sub-national planning and implementation would help deliver results on the ground. Building strong partnerships and collaboration with local authorities, especially when resource flows from the center to the local bodies are very limited, would be critical to make a difference in development outcomes. These partnerships could be more effective if it starts right from the beginning. Given the stronger role expected from the non-governmental sector in achieving SDGs, it is paramount to strengthen the partnership with all stakeholders, including donors, the private sector and the civil society.

Most countries are members of regional blocks, typically targeting cooperation towards strengthened economic development. This could be a window for peer exchange. An initiative to get regional blocks to discuss how they should cooperate to achieve the SDGs would allow them to explore such exchange. This is in fact nothing but part of a South-South/Triangular cooperation. We have seen an increase in SS/TC with positive effects on development in developing countries at low cost, but they tend to be isolated and negligible compared to the needs, especially in Africa. Although the UN provides support in promoting SS/TC, its focus is narrow moving away from central themes- trade and investment- where the majority of SS/TC opportunities exist. Expanding the scope of the SS/TC support mechanisms could be an attractive proposition for all stakeholders, more so for developing countries lagging behind in trade and investment.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. You have raised very important issues such as coordination for the SDGs within the UN system, capacity building and involvement of sub-national entities, the role of parliaments and regional and South-South/Triangular cooperation. In what regards what you told us about the Acceleration Action Plan for SDG 2 in Zimbabwe being drafted in consultation with provincial level officials, could you tell us your views on how to ensure collaboration with local authorities throughout the execution of development plans?

Amarakoon Bandara AMARAKOON • Economics Advisor at UNDP

Thank you for the feed back and the follow-up questions.

The Acceleration Action Plan for SDG is an extension of our experience on MDG Acceleration Framework (MAF). The idea behind this approach is to identify the bottlenecks that prevent policy interventions being effectively implemented and then try to address those bottlenecks. As different regions have different issues relating to policies, institutions and resources as well as natural phenomenon such as weather, among others, we adopted a regional level approach to this exercise.  Led by the National Nutritional Council and some District Administrators, and with support from UNDP, the regional representatives including Provincial Food and Nutrition security Committees were provided with technical support on the methodology to interrogate the bottlenecks associated with policy interventions under the national development plan (Zimbabwe Agenda for Sustainable Socio-Economic Transformation, ZimAsset). The resulting outcomes, provincial level accelerated action plans, were the basis for a national level accelerated action plan. The plan investigates bottlenecks relating to inventions under all targets for SDG 2 and comes up with differentiated regional solutions. The responsibility for the implementation of the AAP will rest on all stakeholders, but mainly on the ZimAsset Cluster on Food and Nutrition Security and the United National development assistance through ZUNDAF. A resource mobilization effort to implement the AAP is being considered.

The first step to get the local authorities involved in the process was to have a consultative dialogue with Provincial Administrators on SDGs and in particular the Zimbabwe Position paper on SDGs. This was held in a provincial city. The next step was to get their support (blessings, and participation of provincial level officials) in the exercise to develop the AAP. The dialogues for this exercise have been held in regional centers to give ownership. There is some call for extending the consultation on SDGs at the provincial level further as the initial consultations have been limited and we are exploring having such dialogue in the months ahead depending on resource availability.

While the strategy itself is robust and we intend to explore opportunities to extend the exercise to other prioritized SDGs, resource availability (both local and donor supported) will determine the outcomes.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your speedy response. Zimbabwe's experience brings a distinct “bottom-up” view on planning as the national acceleration plan was build based on what the provincial level action plans established, all led by a national entity (National Nutritional Council) but with the support of district administrators. Going one step behind in the process, can you tell us something about how Zimbabwe identified the SDGs that should be prioritized? Did the country adopt the same provincial-to-national approach?

Amarakoon Bandara AMARAKOON • Economics Advisor at UNDP

The identification of prioritized SDGs was done through a wide consultation process which entailed Multi-stakeholder Workshops and several follow up meetings. The stakeholders included Government Departments, Private Sector, Civil Society, Academia, Youth and Women groups, UN Agencies and other Development Partners. This was a provincial-to-national level approach although representatives from all sections of the society participated in the consultations.

As part of the consultation, the ZimAsset (National Development Plan) Clusters (Co-Chaired by a Permanent Secretary and a Captain of Industry) namely: Food Security and Nutrition; Value Addition and Beneficiation; Social Services and Poverty Reduction; Infrastructure and Utilities; and Sub-clusters namely: Fiscal Reform Measures; Aid Coordination and Public Administration, Governance and Performance Management, were tasked with drawing the parallels between the SDGs and their respective areas of work to ensure that the SDGs are truly mainstreamed into the implementation of the national development plan. They were then tasked to identify 2-3 priority SDGs relevant to each cluster. These prioritized SDGs were subject to several rounds of discussion at the SDG Task Force which is guided by the Office of the President and Chaired by the Permanent Secretary to the Ministry of Macroeconomic Planning and Investment Promotion, the focal ministry for SDGs. The SDG Task Force finally recommended the 10 SDGs to be prioritized which are more less the same as those identified by the Clusters.

Melaku Geleta Wakjira (not verified)

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: scope and implications

Melaku Geleta 

Dear Moderator,

This is very useful platform to the UNECOSOC & UNDP to get global reflections towards the UN global support in the context of a ground and national realities. I believe, within these contexts, practical examples would be forwarded in order to address the subject under discussions. My commentary and advices in the three pints flagged by you are spinning around such perspectives. Thank you very much for this early stage chances and e-discussions which I think are critically important to influence the SDG’s 2016-2030 directions;

  1. How can the guiding principle of 'Leave no one behind' be put into practice in implementing the 2030 Agenda in different development contexts (e.g. least developed countries, middle-income countries, high-income countries, fragile states etc.)?
  2. At the international level, what are challenges to ensuring policy coherence for sustainable development? What are some examples of best practice and/or who are the "trail blazers" leading the way to improved coherence?
  3. How could the UN development system provide coordinated and integrated support for the achievement of the 2030 Agenda?

 

  • Least developed countries: for these nations the “Leave no one behind” principle applied through working for inclusive development where the basic needs of the entire nations would to be fulfilled by taking forward the 17 SDG’s  and 169 specific activities. For these nations, having a development model striving for a middle income society must be a priority task. As we all know, under this category cheap labor and abundantly found NR is easily available. However, there is scarcity of foreign direct investments, most of the productions systems are yet at primitive level, technological advancement & opportunities for innovation are at infancy level, research and scientific discoveries are unthinkable, industrialization is not yet reached to the levels of full scale development and the economy is mainly dependent on foreign aid and high loan burden. In contrary to this, the available human and natural resources potential can be converted to economic use, to be tapped to improve the life of the multitudes. This shows that, the availability of a glimmer of hope for successful implementations of SDG’s during 2016-2030. What is required is, to have a clear vision working towards inclusive economic, political and social transformation, lead and guided by democratic political and good governance system. To this category, an inclusive development path is highly recommended because, the issues of marginalization, the rights of indigenous people, resource based conflicts, illicit economic/ financial flow, trans-boundary crimes, the impacts of climate change, population growth, radicalism and terrorism, absences of good governance and corruptions are mainly sourced from the absences of inclusive development approaches.  Unless these issues are properly captured in the due courses of utilizing the available NR and human resources,  followed by improving the life livelihoods of the nation, finally targeted to reach to middle income society , therefore, the vision for 2016-2030 'Leave no one behind' is inconceivable. The primary assignments of the least developing countries should be, first to be ready to provide inclusive and highly prioritized development plan to the nation, second get a national consent & endorsement of their people on the plan, third adhere to the democratic rules of law, fourth mobilize a required resources for the implementation, fifth do the implementation in accountable ways under established good governance system & monitoring & evaluation instruments.  

                

  • Middle-income countries: Take parts of  what has been said above from  least developed countries  and yet, within the middle income countries;

 

  • Improved and quality job creation is still what is required 

 

  • Improved & sustainable sources of income needed

 

  • Improved technology and full scale IT utilization for technological  advancement is very critical  

 

  • Improved,  resilient and diversified economic system must lead the pave to a rod of  high income countries is critical towards SDG’s implementations    

 

 

  • High-income countries: Everyone must be clear that no one can leave in isolated world without understanding the other corner of the globe. If we try, we are driving unsustainable boat may sink at some point or crash at some time. The developing worlds are very important to the existences of high income counties. In this case, the following points are highly recommended to this category;

 

  • It has to start with maintaining what has been achieved in the past and followed by having  a visionary plan for inclusive and sustainable world. There are issues becoming trans-national, trans-boundary, trans-economy, trans-culture, trans-religion that potentially threatening the sustainability of our planet including the high income society. The responsibility of the developed world is threefold compared to the reaming world in implementing SDG’s. This nation needs to improve their national population growth policy for sustainable national development. These nations are on missing of the middle age generation. There are two ways to sustain what has been done by their forefathers; improve their internal population growth policy or support the middle income society to have improved human development policy that strategically can be absorbed by the economy of high income society. Using the fully nurtured and practically proofed democratic system in the highly developed nations, the high income courtiers should support the development of the remaining world as they able to have secure and protected political and economic system. The more fragile stats we are having in the world, the less the international security existing. Improving this context would guarantee the strategic, economic and development needs & alliances of high income counties with other nations usually cross boundary alliances. The 17 SDG’s and 169 activities are effective instruments to practically exercising the above facts for the interest of both high & low-income countries.

 

  • Encourage international companies to go to the developing countries to promote foreign direct investments. This would strategically help the highly developed countries to decrease issues related to human trafficking, cross border crimes, illegal migrations, and terrorism. In additions, highly developed countries are equally responsible to decrease a climate change impacts in low income countries through supporting green economy initiatives. More than 50% of SDG’s agendas are crafted to address challenges directly related to climate change impacts which were primarily caused by industrialized world, keep suffering economies of poor world under chronic food and human security. The way the high income countries support the agenda should emanate from the global goal for having sustainable and safe world. Hence, the resources for investment, the strategic support expected for 2016-2030 SDG’s implementation must be injected from high income countries for mutual & global accountability.      

 

 

  • Fragile states; Most problems observed in fragile stats are resulted from failure to deliver on national security and needs for development. This failure is growing to another and a new religion-political ideology. Fundamentalism, radicalism, its associated impacts are becoming international concerns. Because of poor handling of the problems at early stages, so many crises flourished and affecting the world in many directions.  If we conduct a strategic impact inquiry in the fragile countries, we can see a critical association between politics, economy and religion (these have become inseparable ideologies). The SDG’s was announced where this agenda was reached at its pick in the failed states and already understood as global challenge. The fate of the implementation of the SDG’s is primarily falling on the shoulder of politics, tolerance, peace and security. The peace and security issues are still a problem for leaders of the fragile states to come together to have a national vision. Most of the failed state and potentially failed states leaders are motivated by attitudes of narrow nationalism & narrow economic interests. The national vision is secondary matter to them. They have failed to think inclusively. SDG’s begin with thinking’s of inclusive development with a motto saying “no one left behind” at the end of 2030. Inclusivity wouldn’t be achieved without national reconciliation. What can be done to implement SDG’s in the fragile states is that, the problems related to peace and security must get a full attention of the UN and its alliances. Once the fragile and potentially at margin fragile states leaders make a clear demarcation between ideologies, local interests and national interests, then, they will have a national vision which is a precondition to deliver on SDG’s. A practical role of the UN must be on assuring on how to bring stability through the participation of the local community and political vanguards of each failed & potentially failed states. But we should not forget that each year the number of countries on the borderlines failed sates is increasing. Unless the world able to manage the existing one, we shall have more fragile sates sooner or later. We are on the age easy communication of cross boundary crisis. We have a very a good lesson for the UN and it alliances to be taken as example. We all remember the Arab spring invaded so many countries in a very few months. All involved national are sharing certain things in common. We know what happing across those countries. Similarly, such cross country crisis could ignite any time in any parts of the world that could potentially invade so many countries. Therefore, in a context of fragile states, the chance for the successful SDG’s 2016-2030 implementation is based on delivering on required political reforms followed by provision of inclusive political and economic policies.

 Melaku Geleta Wakjira

UNDP Ethiopia 

DRR & LR Program Coordinator 

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment.Your analysis on key areas for making progress for sustainable development has been quite comprehensive. Could you tell us more on what you believe can be done to ensure that partnerships (nationally and internationally speaking) effectively contribute to capacity building and sustainable development?

Lanre Rotimi (not verified)

Dear Team,Thanks for responding to our comments - although this has been done in private. The Focused Points Paper we submitted earlier (copy attached) address the specific follow up questions you have asked:-1. Could you tell us more on what you believe can be done to ensure that partnerships (nationally and internationally speaking) effectively contribute to capacity building and sustainable development?2.  After this e-discussion ends, a report will be submitted to ECOSOC by the Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA) and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), entities responsible for convening this electronic discussion. With that in mind, and considering that there are no “one size fits all” answers, can you tell us your thoughts on how to effectively mainstream the SDGs into relevant national sustainable development policies?Please take fresh critical look at the Paper and you will discover that the above questions have been answered. However, the Report to ECOSOC by DESA and UNDP based on the Synthesis of all good ideas and pertinent suggestions harvested from this Global Consultation is likely to be following a specific structure and format. Should you desire that we reformat the Paper and related Papers we had submitted to various UN Entities in the past as a contribution towards ensuring the Report achieves Better Result upon dissemination to UN Member States, UN System including WBG and IMF and MGoS, please let us have the Structure and Format of the Report and we are glad to Align and Harmonize our various Submission to same.Please recognize that it is Member States that DECIDE what UN System including WBG and IMF Entities Do and in performing these Duties and Responsibilities UN System including WBG and IMF listen to the Voices of MGoS. Yet MGoS have refused to organize themselves for Stronger and more effective Voice. Even their Global Consultations are not driven by sound principles of Transparency, Accountability and Stakeholder Participation. If correct answers are to be found to the 2 questions, Policy Makers and Decision Makers on over 300 UN Member States; UN System including WBG and IMF and 9 MGs and 3 or 4 other Stakeholders, MGoS (speaking for Non MGoS Non State Actors in the UN System), Individually and Jointly need to demonstrate and be seen to demonstrate minimum certain levels of Transparency, Accountability and Stakeholder Participation in the Design and Delivery of Policy, Program and Project Interventions, 3PIs and 3PIs Training as One in each Action Agenda Item in revised AAAA, SDG, COP21 Outcome, UN Retreat on MSP Outcome, ECOSOC Retreat Outcome, HLPF Retreat Outcome, Agenda 21 Aligned and Harmonized with National Development Plans in each pf over 300 UN Member States, UN System including WBG and IMF, MGoS and Non MGoS sides. Our Papers set out the One Worldwide Approach for doing this. This is not the same as One Cap Fits All but the practical implementation of the One Worldwide Approach Recommendation in the SG Synthesis Report December 2014.We do look forward to opportunity to making meaningful contribution towards enriching the report to ECOSOC by DESA and UNDP.Best wishes,Lanre RotimiDirector GeneralInternational Society for Poverty Elimination /Economic Alliance Group andDirector NEHAP (New End Hunger and Poverty) On Monday, 14 March 2016, 17:11, "notification@unteamworks.org" <notification@unteamworks.org> wrote:

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your contribution and for sharing concrete suggestions on how SDGs can be effectively mainstreamed in different national contexts and on how to best address implementation challenges of the new Agenda.

Lanre Rotimi (not verified)

Tried unsuccessfully to make posts yesterday. Encouraged to try again today because we recieved notification on posts of others. It is our hope that the Technical Problem is resolved abd this Post is published.

We observe that this Platform has 2 E-discussion Facilitators from Canada and Brazil - both of whom are very active in driving discussions. This is very commendable and ought to be replicated on the other 2 Platforms where there is at present no contribution from any E-discussion Facilitator.

The Key points we tried to make yesterday were on need for Policy Makers and Decision Makers on UN Member States (over 300), UN System including WBG and IMF and MGoS sided to recognize that they have agreed on the “what” in regard to partnership and share common interests and goals, yet the details on “how” still need to be developed, that many UN Events scheduled specifically to find correct answers to these "how" questions end up finding answer to"what" questions".

Is this Platform really serious about making significant contribution to answer to "how" questions? Can the E-discussion Facilitators from Canada and Brazil each assure Participants that this in not about "talking and thinking" but about "action and accomplishment" and that all "good ideas and pertinent suggestions" harvested from this E-discussion will be presented to all concerned Policy Makers and Decision Makers on UN Member States 9over 300), UN System including WBG and IMF and MGoS sides for Full Implementation with effective Monitoring and Evaluation of this Implementation?

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your contribution. You have raised a relevant question: can this e-discussion provide decision-makers with ways (“hows”) that can help UN country members to achieve the SDGs? As you already know, this e-discussion seeks “to engage stakeholder groups, experts, practitioners and policy-makers across the globe in a  dialogue" that should “provide ECOSOC with suggestions and recommendations on how to best address implementation challenges of the new Agenda”. The questions that guide this electronic forum have been elaborated with that purpose in mind. Also, in support to the discussions, moderators try to stimulate participation with follow up questions, examples and comments. After this e-discussion ends, a report will be submitted to ECOSOC by the Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA) and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), entities responsible for convening this electronic discussion. With that in mind, and considering that there are no “one size fits all” answers, can you tell us your thoughts on how to effectively mainstream the SDGs into relevant national sustainable development policies?

Melaku Geleta Wakjira (not verified)

Mainstreaming SDG’s within national sustainable development policies

By Melaku Geleta Wakjira

DRR-LR program coordinator

UNDP Ethiopia

melaku_geleta@hotmail.com

Dear Moderator, on top of what has been shared
last weeks, I suggest the following points to be considered to refine more on
the issues & the discussions towards suggesting the “how” question in the
SDG’s mainstreaming process within countries national sustainable development polices.
     

1.   
One of the critical challenges for SDG’s implementations
is the basic and fundamental difference between countries in all aspects. Even though
one of the SDG’s designed to work against this problem, i.e. to narrow a gap,
this may not be simple task as we think for the following reasons.

 

·        
Countries are living in different political
systems and zones

·        
Countries are pursuing different growth and development
ideologies

·        
Countries are dependent on  different national priorities

·        
Countries have different economic and social
standards best fit to the achieved and aspired  economic growth and development  

 

2.   
The other critical challenge for SDG’s implementation
is the type of plans countries having this day, i.e. the development and growth
plans are differ from countries to countries 1. By the type of the plan, 2. By duration
of the plan 3. By issues and priorities to be addressed in the plan 4. By goal
of the plan.

 

3.   
 The commonalties
and differences among countries are diversified; hence, we have to check if the
followings are fully or partially available within a specific country to think of”
how “to mainstream SDG’s within the national plans & policies. NOTE: Some
countries have at least 1 national roadmap or  perspective plan or  and indicative plan or  master plan for which all are operating beyond
10 years and above implementation time.  Within
these contexts, again so many irregularities and inconsistencies are exist;
however, to respond to the question “how” in general, we can do the mainstreaming
work at least in areas identified as bellow. It is good to examine the SDG’s, targets
and key indicators across areas summarized under this part.  

·        
What types of perspective plan 15-20 years,  what development plan 3-7 years are available (we
have to make sure if the perspective plan is available, if so, to know to what extent
the plan have accommodated elements of SDG’s is very priority;  if not think how to bring the SDG’s  to the scene and think about mainstreaming. Then
proceed to continue the mainstreaming issues with the  development plan usually  covers 3-7 years

·        
What social security policy available for sustainable
income and decent life, to what extent these are based on the principles of inclusive
development, what elements of SDG’s can be mainstreamed in the coming 15 years?
      

·        
What social service policy available? to what
extent the rule of  equity and equality are
pinpointed in the policy?   What elements of SDG’s can be mainstreamed in
the coming 15 years? Within this streamline    

·        
Economic policy (for trade, industry, tourism) do
we have a chance to think of SDG’s mainstreaming?

·        
Infrastructure development policy; etc.

·        
Natural resource development and protection
policy; etc.

·        
Land use and land management policy; etc.

·        
Green economy policy/ green growth policy; etc.

·        
Cultural policy; etc.  

·        
Energy policy; etc.

·        
Rural development policy; etc.

·        
Urban development policy; etc.

·        
National security & foreign policy; etc.

·        
Political system & good governance policy; etc.

·        
Political and economic decentralization policy; etc.

   

Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2016 17:46:26 +0000To: melaku_geleta@hotmail.comFrom: notification@unteamworks.orgSubject: [Teamworks] E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil commented on the Discussion "National Implementation"You can post a reply on Teamworks by replying d

Santiago Roberto Bertoglia

Estimado Moderador Pedro Conceicao

Estimados Colegas del Equipo:

Es mi deseo entregarles el siguiente archivo adjunto "ESCRITO A CÁMARA 2", intentando responder a las preguntas amables.

 

E-discussion Facilitator

Gracias por su contribución. El archivo adjunto trata de un pedido a la Cámara Federal de Apelaciones para investigar violaciones a los derechos humanos causadas por la explosión de un refinería en Argentina. Podría Usted nos relatar la cuestión y contarnos cómo cree que la inclusión de los SDGs en las políticas públicas podría contribuir para la promoción de los derechos humanos en su país? Y cómo las Naciones Unidas podría apoyar este proceso?

Lanre Rotimi (not verified)

It is a puzzle none of the E-discussion Facilitators from Brazil and Canada, or indeed any participant has responded to issues raised in last Post. Please find attached herewith a recent Focused Points Paper elaborating on points made. Can Facilitators and Participants help give wide dissemination to Policy Makers and Decision Makers on UN Member States, UN System including WBG and IMF and MGoS sides?

Is there anyone willing and able to pick up the gauntlet and engage us in constructive discussion on way forward in Global Interest?

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. Most of the contributions to this e-discussion have been posted during weekdays, which is probably why participants have not yet engaged in answering the questions you have raised. Perhaps you could help stimulate discussion by explaining further the "One Worldwide Approach" that your paper suggests could get "Village to Global Stakeholders to stop working in 'silos' and start working in 'teams'; to stop using 'multiple approaches' some of which are divergent and start using 'generic approach' adapted to meet unique and specific need of particular location or circumstance". Also, could you tell us more about your experience in engaging sub-national, national and international partners in cooperation for development?

Lanre Rotimi (not verified)

Thank you e-Discussion Facilitator from Brazil. We have done attached Paper in response to issues you raise. We hope that this time all e-Discussion Facilitators and as many Participants as possible will have focused interactive dialogue in Global Interest on all Points made. We are glad to make clarification and or provide additional information as may be required.

Melaku Geleta Wakjira (not verified)

Mainstreaming SDG’s within national sustainable development policiesBy Melaku Geleta Wakjira
DRR-LR program coordinator
UNDP Ethiopia
melaku_geleta@hotmail.com
Dear Moderator, on top of what has been shared last weeks, I suggest the following points to be considered to refine more on the issues & the discussions towards suggesting the “how” question in the SDG’s mainstreaming process within countries national sustainable development polices.
1. One of the critical challenges for SDG’s implementations is the basic and fundamental difference between countries in all aspects. Even though one of the SDG’s designed to work against this problem, i.e. to narrow a gap, this may not be simple task as we think for the following reasons.

• Countries are living in different political systems and zones
• Countries are pursuing different growth and development ideologies
• Countries are dependent on different national priorities
• Countries have different economic and social standards best fit to the achieved and aspired economic growth and development

2. The other critical challenge for SDG’s implementation is the type of plans countries having this day, i.e. the development and growth plans are differ from countries to countries 1. By the type of the plan, 2. By duration of the plan 3. By issues and priorities to be addressed in the plan 4. By goal of the plan.

3. The commonalties and differences among countries are diversified; hence, we have to check if the followings are fully or partially available within a specific country to think of” how “to mainstream SDG’s within the national plans & policies. NOTE: Some countries have at least 1 national roadmap or perspective plan or and indicative plan or master plan for which all are operating beyond 10 years and above implementation time. Within these contexts, again so many irregularities and inconsistencies are exist; however, to respond to the question “how” in general, we can do the mainstreaming work at least in areas identified as bellow. It is good to examine the SDG’s, targets and key indicators across areas summarized under this part.
• What types of perspective plan 15-20 years, what development plan 3-7 years are available (we have to make sure if the perspective plan is available, if so, to know to what extent the plan have accommodated elements of SDG’s is very priority; if not think how to bring the SDG’s to the scene and think about mainstreaming. Then proceed to continue the mainstreaming issues with the development plan usually covers 3-7 years
• What social security policy available for sustainable income and decent life, to what extent these are based on the principles of inclusive development, what elements of SDG’s can be mainstreamed in the coming 15 years?
• What social service policy available? to what extent the rule of equity and equality are pinpointed in the policy? What elements of SDG’s can be mainstreamed in the coming 15 years? Within this streamline
• Economic policy (for trade, industry, tourism) do we have a chance to think of SDG’s mainstreaming?
• Infrastructure development policy; etc.
• Natural resource development and protection policy; etc.
• Land use and land management policy; etc.
• Green economy policy/ green growth policy; etc.
• Cultural policy; etc.
• Energy policy; etc.
• Rural development policy; etc.
• Urban development policy; etc.
• National security & foreign policy; etc.
• Political system & good governance policy; etc.
• Political and economic decentralization policy; etc.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank your for yourt comment. You suggest that, in order to mainstream SDGs  into relevant national sustainable development policies, we should first consider commonalities and differences among countries and then examine  the Agenda 2030 against existing development policies in areas such as social security, infrastructure investment, rural development etc. In your experience, how do you propose such exercise to be realized, specially in countries with limited (human and financial) resources? What could be the role of the UN development system in that process? How (should it be necessary) to mobilize stakeholders to engage in such analysis?

Melaku Geleta Wakjira (not verified)

The Role of the UN in SDG’s mainstreaming
both at policy and implementation level.

By: Melaku
Geleta

DRR
& LR Program Coordinator

UNDP Ethiopia              

Dear moderator,
thank you for a request for elaborations. I think, as UN we have been giving a technical
supports in the past for so many years. But this time, the support from the UN
to countries must go beyond giving a support for what all proposed by governments.
The technical support from the UN agencies, especially in policy development
and SDG’s mainstreaming should be a challenging, a facilitative and follow a mutual
accountable process. I suggest these approaches because; sometimes the development
policies are derived by ‘individual’s ambitions” regardless
of addressing the national context, reality or priorities for which the UN must
be equally accountable. Meager resources are utilized for not national priority
interventions or less strategic agendas. We have to make a clear demarcation between
“commercial & needy” agendas.  There are
some observation that, countries with less human and financial resources are
found to be the most extravagant one in using national resources for less priority
programs, because of its commercial advantage regardless of its neediness. In addition
to UNDAF development sessions, I suggest, the UN country offices must play a
pivotal role and initiate joint priority setting sessions, through giving
technical support in the areas of commissioning big researches, inviting research
institutions to step in as a solution providers, injecting and trade meaningful
international cooperation’s, informed policy development practices, in depth
problem analysis, through giving sharpened recommendations etc. While countries
prepare development policies, or implement policies, this must be considered
from SDG’s mainstreaming angle. If the UN failed to provide such technical support
to the countries, it is clear that less relevant policies will continue to be implemented
to heal the symptom without addressing the root causes, which is not the case
of SDG’s 2016-2030.

On top
of the upper policy level engagements, depends up on the specific country structures,
it is wise to cascade down to the sub national, regional or sub regional level
the notion behind SDG’s mainstreaming. Once the policy level task is properly
managed, the UN support at implementation level must be well defined and prepared
as parts of SDG’s implementation and mainstreaming packages. I believe the UN could
delivery on the later one as well because there are at least 1 and more than 1 UN
agencies responsible to give a technical support to one of the 17 SDG’s. In these
contexts, the SDG’s mainstreaming challenges would be solved at two levels (at
policy and implementation levels). For the later one the implementation package
is critically important to assure to what extend the SDG’s are mainstreamed.

Melaku
Geleta

DRR
& LR Program Coordinator

UNDP
Ethiopia              

Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2016 19:41:24 +0000To: melaku_geleta@hotmail.comFrom: notification@unteamworks.orgSubject: [Teamworks] E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil commented on the Discussion "National Implementation"You can post a reply o

Patricia Almeida Ashley • Associate Professor at Universidade Federal Fluminense from Brazil

Dear Moderator and colleagues, I am very impressed how many converging points have been raised in discussing National Implementation, coming from different regions/continents, nations and professional backgrounds. Ramit (from India) brings the need for local engagement and empowerment in developing local plans to be recognized and taken into consideration by municipal public agents.  I would add that, for this local context issues/demands, when we take the federative form of government in Republics as is the case of Brazil with three tiers of government (federal, state/provincial and municipal tiers) in which all of them, including the municipal level, have their own hierarquic and coherently integrated Constitutions as to regulate their autonomy, it becomes a very complex and, I would say, expensive manner of public administration and social participation in public planning and budgeting.  National government policies with civic engagement in participatory process in designing and prioritising contents for public policies (through local, municipal, provincial and national Conferences for different sectoral policies) when innovative in contents are mostly innefective in budgeting and policy coherence in pluriannual plans.  See the case of Health and Education National Plans which are not implemented because of a forgotten requirement of tax reform and federation reform.  Municipalities and Provinces are lacking budget, human resources, ICT, political will to implement the national plans of education and health.  I mean even when we see social participation at the most it turns into sporadic cycles of engagements for conferences turning into list of priorities for policies but are not integrated into coherence of public funding.  What is priority in Brazilian public budget is public debt financing.  A tax reform to reduce unfairness in taxation is continuosly avoided.  I am saying that we cannot look at Local Participation without looking at multi-level civic engagement and multi-level policy coherence and integration of sectoral policies and of revenues and expenses in public budget at all governmental tiers. Not to mention international funding and treaties coherence of trade, investment, intelectual properity, financial services and technology with sustainable development goals. For Brazil we still lack guidelines for contents and practice of political education in families and in school´s curriculum at primary, secondary and higher education.  I see this appropriate absence of political civic participation as a trickery element for fragmentation in society and in reproduction of uncoherence and unresponsiveness of public sphere to social and enviromental concerns.  The only dimension of development which is still responded is the economic dimension, mostly reduced to economic growth measured in Gross Domestic Product and issues which are embraced by the ODS 8 in the 2030 Agenda.  I see the newer generations (I am from 1964) 'culturally' trained for achieving their social and economic value only as consumers and professionals/workers, but not as citizens participating at local, state/province and national political institutions.  I can see this institutionally and economically engendred depoliticized generation of children, adolescents and young adults generations (those born since the 80´s in Brazil) when I am teaching the courses I am responsible for in the Environmental Science Bachelor course in the federal university I work (including topics of civism, environmental citizenship, public policies, governance topics).  I´ve had to innovative teaching creating lab practices of politicizing the environmental field and the society/State interface (see an example here in a multi-stakeholder dialogue in environmental disaster of a dam of iron mining waste in Mariana, MG and another lab practice of teaching public policies and sustainable development agendasfrom a socioenvironmental project based learning perspective) Thus, I would like to raise a proposition to this discussion on the question of UN supporting National Implementation which is: remember that there are universities which could be valued and funded to support projects and programs of social, economic, institutional and environmental innovation in responding demands, in a participatory process, in implementation of sustainable development agendas, either from national, provincial or municipal/local communities and public agents, accomplishing university mission in integrating research, teaching and outreach/extension activities.  Brazilian legislation in innovation surprisingly supports funding universities for innovation applied to business.  I am disappointed that the national policy recently approved for science, tecnology and innovation also defines the concept of innovation restricted to business 'clients'.  I mean there is a huge uncoherence of public policies and legal frameworks (approved by the Legislative authorities and regulated by the Executive Authorities) in relation to sustainable development concept and agendas.  Those who write proposals for public policies are not demanded from public sphere agents their recognition of sustainable development agendas (either Agenda 21, MDG Agenda or, I guess and expect, Agenda 2030).  Any suggestion of why that happens?  I see the non-binding/voluntary approach of these sustainable development, development or environmental agendas in a global scale and, on the other hand, the binding trade, investment and financial global agreements (as the Transpacific Partnership) which are solely driven by the economic/business/intelectual property perspective and subverting the power game of National Policies versus Corporations´ rights/duties. In Brazil, there is one nationally funded program called PROEXT at the Ministry of Education which aims to support other ministries´ sectoral public policies, but not yet a clear area for funding in implementing Sustainable Development Agendas, even the forgotten Agenda 21 which never was recognized as reference for designing the national, provincial and municipal government plans (Pluriannual Plans), kept detached or seen as a single budget line in the planning and budgeting process.  I had two previous experiences of funding by the PROEXT through the Ecocidades Extension Program (www.ecocidades.uff.br) which had clear and documented impact from building capacities and engaging participants in communities and local committees at municipalities, as well as impacts at the students in higher education, engaging them for 'turning around that face/body' from a solely 'hygienic depolitized professional or scientific career' and building a civic experience and engagement, opening possibilities of civic driven change for their sense of purpose of knowledge in higher education.  The institutional mission of universities in Brasil establishes research/teaching/extension as an integrated agenda.  However, when we look at sources of funding to academic staff and when we see the institutional plan for salaries and career path in federal universities, the social value is mostly based on how many scientific papers and publications, mostly with international audience, are 'produced'.  The productivity paradigm detaches Universities from local communities and local contexts as to turn them into barns of publishable scientific knowledge. I have already shared, with this discussion group, a case study paper of Brazilian Local Agendas 21 in 14 municipalities in a global call by UNDP, UNICEF and UN Women, on Participatory Monitoring and Accountability: A Means of Implementation for the Post-2015 Agenda , which moderators are already aware and that Ramit and colleagues may like to look at, in which I mention recommendations towards funding for binding Universities to community demands.  Sorry for reposting it. Kind Regards Prof. Dr Patricia Almeida Ashley Nucleo de Estudos em EcoPoliticas e EConsCiencias - www.ecopoliticas.uff.br International Policy and Research on Territories of Social Responsibility - www.intsr.uff.br Programa de Extensao Ecocidades - www.ecocidades.uff.br Environmental Science Course - www.cienciaambiental.uff.br Department of Geoenvironmental Analysis - Institute of GeosciencesUniversidade Federal Fluminense - www.uff.br Niteroi - RJ - Brazil

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. In the case study you shared, you describe the importance of social participation in monitoring the implementation of the Post-2015 Agenda and highlights the role of information and communications technology - ICT in providing access to information and promoting engagement. Could you tell us more about how sustainable development issues were included in local government agendas (planning and budgeting) in Brazil? What lessons can the "Agenda 21 Comperj Initiative" bring to successfully mainstreaming the SDGs into national policies?

Patricia Almeida Ashley • Associate Professor at Universidade Federal Fluminense from Brazil

Dear facilitator from Brazil, I remark two of the conclusions of the case study in Agenda 21 Comperj partnership with University, which could contribute in the design and implementation of national strategies of the Agenda 2030 for sustainable development: Funding sources to sustainable development cooperation adopting an integrated territorial, multi-actor and multi-level approach to partnerships

[...] There is a gap in current regular funding sources to sustainable development cooperation adopting an integrated territorial, multi-actor and multi-level approach to partnerships among multilateral organizations, government, business, universities, civil society organizations and related communities.  Acting locally requires integrating actors and tiers of decision-making not restricted to a local level.   A more integrated approach for partnerships could indeed become a step forward to move out from solitary projects’ and individuals’ vision designed from within organizations’ walls, a common fragmentation of organizational initiatives and/or a superficial and episodic social participation in development cooperation.  The case shows an attempt to move out of the walls of current ‘solitary acts’ funding schemes.  The challenge of the volume and degree of integrated approach to funding is rather big for sustainable development cooperation among actors and levels in specific territories.

For instance, looking from the universities and professors’ position in Brazil, they are most exclusively funded to demonstrate science productivity in scientific papers, detached from neighborhood demands and community surroundings for other languages, meanings and services. Producing and publishing research papers in internationally recognized scientific journals as well as producing patents to increase economic value of scientific knowledge are academic requirements: to value the grades of the graduate courses accredited by the government accreditation body; to increase the opportunities for research project funding or academic congress participation funded by the government research funding body; and to progress in professors’ career plans.  These requirements transform research into an eternal collective egos’ competition ‘within the walls’ of academic universe.  Outreach projects or extension services to community development or training are taken as a non-valued academic activity, less punctuated in university budget, in the public recognition of professors, in grade excellency of graduate courses or in the curricular distinction of undergraduate students. 

The current case illustrates a symbiosis between projects of a combined research and community outreach group in an university, rooting research issues into the regional ‘soil’ of society, business and government in the university surroundings in Rio de Janeiro state. The case shows that even a relatively low budget in a university project for outreach service to community could be leveraged and effective by adopting active searching and bonding common joint goals and partnerships from different government bodies and from an existent corporate communication project.  The Ecocidades Extension Program offered in 2012 and 2013 information and training to 14 Local Agenda 21 Forums, initially funded with 30 thousand Brazilian reais from the Ministry of Education and the Ministry of Cities through the Proext 2011 public national call.  The first partnership in 2012 was between the Ecocidades Extension Program with the Comperj Agenda 21 Project promoting mutual support for each one´s goals in capacity building of 14 Local Agenda 21 Forums in order to improve a better link and response of local government public policies to the local sustainable development plan.  Two other strong partners since 2012 have been the Corruption Prevention Actions Unit of the General Comptroller Agency of the federal government of Brazil and the Urban Development Unit and Capacidades Program of the Ministry of Cities.  Later on, we could also attract new partners in events in 2013, especially during the Seminar ‘Governance and Sustainable Development: From Global to Local’[1] in August 2013, in Petrobras.  The event counted with the audience of 14 forums of Local Agenda 21 and was possible because of partnership with: the Rio de Janeiro State Secretary for Environment - SEA; the Department of Social Participation of the Secretary-General of the Presidency of Republic of Brazil – SGPR/DPS; and two projects’ coordinators in the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics – IBGE, one related to yearly research on local governments institutional capacity and the other related to the biannual Brazilian sustainable development indicators.  Since then, the network of partners has increased further, once the accumulated collective knowledge capacity of Agenda 21 Foruns leveraged their stronger political and social organization and resulted in a new participative monitoring political arena – The Committee of Local Agenda 21 of the Leste Fluminense region (ComArc), involving those municipalities, and they becoming able to influence into other government levels.  Thus, building capacity of Local Agenda 21 Forums brought better understanding that acting locally requires integrating tiers of decision-making not restricted to local level, but necessarily influencing and engaging the next tier of the state level decision-making policy arena in the Rio de Janeiro State Government. Each one of the partners could support the Ecocidades Extension Program and Comperj Agenda 21 Project offering their knowledge, teaching material, publications, data, speakers and infrastructure for events, meetings and short courses for Local Agenda 21 Forums, as well as have benefited in learning from the academic, government, business and communities knowledge and experience in active participation in the activities.

Wider public access to broad band internet and public knowledge on how to access and understand the data about public policies

There is a gap in wider public access to broadband internet and public knowledge on how to access and understand the data about public policies, either personally visiting government bodies or accessing virtual sources in the web.  Participation in the Local Agenda 21 Forums were mostly done by adults or seniors and their maturity and experience have brought a lot of popular knowledge and expertise of years of living and working in their own community and in relations to the public sphere. Among the projects’ target participants, both the Comperj Agenda 21 Project and the Ecocidades Extension Program have identified the Local Agenda 21 Forums gap of information access.  Thus, the web-based tool was a common tactic for conceiving, organizing data and delivering information and training services in languages and visual design adapted to the target participants. Also, the face to face meetings and debates in classroom were, indeed, rich encounters of mixed perspectives and specific training background and languages from representatives[2] of government, business, civil society and communities of 14 Local Agenda 21 Forums.   They were brought together in the second semester of 2012 during a 64 hours course introducing topics in: policy making; leadership in public governance; available tools for public transparency and accountability; and current sanitation policy in federal and Rio de Janeiro state government.

The success of both partners’ projects depended on the languages and contents provided in their respective websites, complementing the activities done in events, meetings, short courses and printed publications distributed to the 14 Local Agenda 21 Foruns.  Thus, wider public access to internet has become key to success for capacity building and effective participative monitoring and accountability, especially as is the case of a free public broadband access to internet in a huge area we were dealing with multi-tier government and multiple actors’ projects. And, on the other side, content provided by government bodies at different levels have been key to advance capacity to participatory monitoring and accountability of public policies and spending.  The General Comptroller Agency (CGU) has been a key partner in capacity building on transparency and social control, by means of the Transparency Portal, training activities and publications in public transparency and social control. The Ministry of Cities launched the The Capacidades Portal for public access to training contents on urban development and projects funded by the Ministry of Cities[3].

 

Kind Regards Patricia Almeida Ashley[1] See more at http://www.ecopoliticas.uff.br/index.php/governanca-e-desenvolvimento-sustentavel.html

[2] See the list of participants at http://www.ecocidades.uff.br/index.php/alunosealunas[3] See some partners’ projects websites mentioned in the case: www.agenda21comperj.com.br (The Comperj Agenda 21 Project, from Petrobras), www.ecocidades.uff.br (The Ecocidades Extension Program, from Rede EConsCiencia e Ecopoliticas research and extension group at UFF), www.portaldatransparencia.gov.br (The Transparency Portal, from CGU) and www.capacidades.gov.br (the Capacidades Portal, from the Ministry of Cities).

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your speedy response, Patricia. As proposed in the case study you present, in countries where higher education is funded by the government, universities could be prompted to act as catalysts for capacity building and knowledge sharing among stakeholders - when provided adequate and regular funding. Your case study also hughlights an important issue: the fact that granting access to information is only one step in ensuring the engagement of stakeholders. Another step would be to build capacity on how to access and understand data on public policies.

E-discussion Facilitator

Dear E-Discussion Facilitator from Brazil, Indeed, you clearly understood what we meant as authors of the case study in the Agenda 21 Comperj partnership with the Programa de Extensao Ecocidades of Universidade Federal Fluminense, Brazil.  The contents of the teaching material we used in the capacity building course, funded by Proext, to the 14 Local Foruns of Agenda 21, they are freely available at the website Programa de Extensao Ecocidades - www.ecocidades.uff.br - Section Item Foruns Agenda 21.  A picture of the last day of capacity building with the 14 Foruns you can see here. Because of budget cuts in the Ministry of Education in 2015, the program could not be funded by Proext 2016 call, even getting a national grade of 92.  Several other initiatives at Proext 2015 could not be funded because of the budget cuts over the Ministry of Education Proext which funds the implementation of public policies from the federal government with the support of public universities extension projects.  Otherwise, if we had the  budget approved, which was on capacity building for implementation of the Agenda 2030 to be applied during 2016 and 2017, we would have 24 higher education students working in the program offering Information, Capacity Building and Advisory Services to public agents and committees and Agenda 21 Foruns. What I mean is that Brazilian Proext is a well thought way of integrating Universities, Communities and Public Policies.  What we need to add to Proext content is a straighforward and transversal content of Agenda 2030 with its 17 goals and 169 targets.  See more on Proext 2015 call and results at this link in the Ministry of Education of Brazil. I hope that the next call in 2016 and other new years call adopt this strategic alignment of contents in the PROEXT Calls of public policies, Agenda 2030 and Pluriannual Plan, supporting Universities for engaging with the 17 goals and 169 targets with its neighborhood and surroundings regional context in a participatory and cooperative way (government, business, communities, civil society organizations and Universities).  Better if the United Nations could build funding agendas for integrated and cooperative partnerships in a territorial perspective, considering the experience of Proext model of funding the implementation of public policies as part of higher education engagement with society. Kind Regards Patricia Almeida Ashley Em 16/03/2016 14:41, notification@unteamworks.org escreveu:

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Posted on: E-discussion Facilitator New comment on Discussion National Implementation by E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil : Thank you for your speedy

Thank you for your speedy response, Patricia. As proposed in the case study you present, in countries where higher education is funded by the government, universities could be prompted to act as catalysts for capacity building and knowledge sharing among stakeholders - when provided adequate and regular funding. Your case study also hughlights an important issue: the fact that granting access to information is only one step in ensuring the engagement of stakeholders. Another step would be to build capacity on how to access and understand data on public policies.

16 Mar 2016 [ read more ] [ reply ]

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E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your contribution to this e-discussion. Government funding for university extension programs are certainly subject to availability of financial resources and to the policy-making process. What do you think could be done to engange other stakeholders in capacity-building projects designed by universities?

Dr. Abdulghany Mohamed • from Canada

Dear Participants,

Thanks for your contributions and my appreciation to the facilitators. I have greatly benefitted from your invaluable postings to date.

I would like to suggest that, in order to mainstream and promote national implementation(s) of the SDGs as well as to ensure effective program/project follow-up and reviews, it is imperative that national conversations be accorded serious consideration. It is my humble opinion that sustained, robust, constructive, broad and grassroots-based involvement and dialogue within and across communities is critical in enabling disparate stakeholders to articulate goals, provide clear direction, foster buy-in and project ownership, engender empowerment, build momentum, garner new ideas, exchange/transfer of knowledge and best practices, help harness collective strengths as well as provide space to air/voice concerns; and hence provide the means for social cohesion and nation building. Moreover, national conversations are also crucial in program/project review and monitoring. The question then is: how can communities/nations etc. launch and sustain the proposed dialogues?

Briefly, I suggest that a variety of approaches and methods will be required as deemed appropriate within different cultural contexts. For instance, conversations about the SDGs could be fostered in: (a) youths/students activities (e.g., in extra-curricular activities including debating clubs, drama clubs, singing choirs, essay and poster competitions, etc.), (b) the incorporation of SDG implementation in local/national celebrations/festivals, (c) the meaningful involvement/engagement of artists (fine and performing arts), and (d) providing enhanced impetus for the role of mass media and social media in fostering development activities (locally, nationally and regionally). These and many other approaches/techniques could be employed to foster conversations and stakeholder engagement at multiple levels/domains. To be sure, support and capacity building for these endeavours (from local, national and global champions) would be crucial in ensuring their success.

In short, conversations at local, sub-national, national, regional and international levels could potentially help to bring together citizens (as well as citizens with their respective leaders) to talk about the SDGs and exchange experiences. These dialogues, I believe, would not only support endeavours to meet the information, communication and networking needs of various stakeholders, they could also serve as drivers of both social and economic/business creativity and innovation which are critical in implementing the SDGs. Conversely, failure to collectively think and converse/dialogue about the SDGs will most likely leave communities and stakeholder ill-prepared and handicapped in implementing the SDGs.

Thanks and looking forward to your reactions and contributions.

Cheers,

Dr. Abdulghany  Mohamed

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment and for your suggestions on how to engage communities to foster conversations and stakeholder engagement on SDGs at multiple levels. Could you tell us more about how sustainable development issues are included in the local media and other cultural activities and clubs in your country? Are any best practices applicable to Agenda 2030?

Dr. Abdulghany Mohamed • from Canada

Dear Facilitator,

Thank you very much for your reaction and follow up questions. An example that immediately comes to mind are the efforts by West African artists in the fight against the recent Ebola epidemic and the support they received from the mass media (e.g., radio). Their song “Africa Stop Ebola” (Tiken Jah Fakoly, Amadou & Mariam, Salif Keita, Oumou Sangare and others) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ruYQY6z3mV8 is a commendable instance of forging/fostering national conversation whose lessons we could draw upon in fostering dialogue and citizen engagement in implementing the SDGS (e.g., in implementing Goal #3 Good Health and Well-being).

Regards,

Dr. Abdulghany Mohamed

Priscilla (not verified)

Thank you Dr Mohammed , other areas that could be focused on are;  reaching the parliamentarians, who are  key policy and decision makers at national level. First enabling them appreciate the 17 goals and have them debate on them for a common understanding  and how each of the goals could be achieved. The parliamentary debates are of national interest and thus arouse  discussions  outside the parliament. If the top leaders of any society get engaged , then SDGs implementation is likely to have the necessary resources to guide and of facilitation of the whole process of implementation. UN can play a role in engaging the local and National policy makers and organizations to ensure the SDGs implementation process is discussed at this levels to ensure , 1/ the purpose of SDGs is clear to the citizens, 2nd a participatory approach is sought after in its implementation and last to try and keep the focus on the subject. National UNDP online discussions such as this one, would enable to keep the fire burning , including a reach  to the religious institutions who are key partners in development in most of the states as they command a huge population too. Mass media , in particular radio programs, in kenya, and i believe in most of the countries we have radio focused programs on development , which discuss particular topics, and allow discussion with the listeners through facilitation of the programs by experts, this too would enable wider engagement. The private sector, could get engaged into this promotion through their corporate  social responsibility, and if all have one common vision then its likely to reach a wider population   Thank you. Priscilla

Priscilla (not verified)

Dear moderator, Priscilla and other colleagues I support all recommendations made by Priscilla.  Just to recall a part of her message " reaching the parliamentarians, who are  key policy and decision makers at national level."  But not without a strong mobilization for society awareness and debates, for their organized support for renewal and coherence of legal frameworks which are either new propositions or already established ones which creates limitations for policy coherence to the 17 goals. I would reinforce this double action of Parliaments and Society awareness, engagement and participatory monitoring for accountability by the governmental tiers (national and subnational), financial agents and entrepreneurs/business with an illustration of the national mobilization of the Federal Public Ministry (Ministerio Publico Federal) in Brazil which analysed the current gaps in Brazilian legislation that have dismantled actions against corruption.  The campaign 10 Medidas de Combate à Corrupção (10 Measures against Corruption) is a package of 10 different and complementary proposals for changes aiming updating Brazilian constitutional and infra-constitutional legal frameworks against corruption.  However, the Legislative Authority (National Congress) has not moved for their approval (just a small group of parliamentaries).  Then the way to involve legislative support was to collect the required minimum number of electors (around 1,5 million) to sign the petition with the 10 measures.  The campaign started in mid 2015 and at the moment we have reached more than the minimum number (around 1,6 million signatures) in all 27 provinces.  See more at http://www.dezmedidas.mpf.mp.br/ So, what I want to reinforce is we need to understand that Parliaments in weak democracies are not fairly representatives of all segments of society, but mostly moved by economic dimension (either in a public perspective or, in corruption, in a very much private and personal perspective for monetary gains). Thus, the ODS 16 and ODS 17 need to be seen as twins for turning the other ODS as part of the institutional conditions of the Agenda 2030, at least in a 'national' zone territory of countries. But as there are other layers over countries (multilateral agreements, global treaties), as moderators have mentioned in the report of the second week of discussion, we need Vertical, Horizontal and, I would add a bit more of pepper in it, a Time Span policy coherence (short, medium and long term goals and targets) on treaties, guidelines, pluriannual plans, programs, financial projects, and so on. Kind Regards Patricia Almeida Ashley www.intsr.uff.br and www.ecopoliticas.uff.br Em 16/03/2016 02:51, notification@unteamworks.org escreveu:

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Posted on: E-discussion Facilitator New comment on Discussion National Implementation by Priscilla DRR Programme Officer from Kenya : Thank you Dr Mohammed , other

Thank you Dr Mohammed , other areas that could be focused on are;  reaching the parliamentarians, who are  key policy and decision makers at national level. First enabling them appreciate the 17 goals and have them debate on them for a common understanding  and how each of the goals could be achieved. The parliamentary debates are of national interest and thus arouse  discussions  outside the parliament. If the top leaders of any society get engaged , then SDGs implementation is likely to have the necessary resources to guide and of facilitation of the whole process of implementation. UN can play a role in engaging the local and National policy makers and organizations to ensure the SDGs implementation process is discussed at this levels to ensure , 1/ the purpose of SDGs is clear to the citizens, 2nd a participatory approach is sought after in its implementation and last to try and keep the focus on the subject. National UNDP online discussions such as this one, would enable to keep the fire burning , including a reach  to the religious institutions who are key partners in development in most of the states as they command a huge population too. Mass media , in particular radio programs, in kenya, and i believe in most of the countries we have radio focused programs on development , which discuss particular topics, and allow discussion with the listeners through facilitation of the programs by expert! s, this too would enable wider engagement. The private sector, could get engaged into this promotion through their corporate  social responsibility, and if all have one common vision then its likely to reach a wider population   Thank you. Priscilla

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Dr. Abdulghany Mohamed • from Canada

Dear Priscilla,

Thanks for your comment. I couldn’t agree more. Parliamentarians have a critical role in ensuring that the SDGs are mainstreamed in public policies and discourse as well as providing an essential link between the legislatures and citizens in their respective constituencies. I also concur that the private sector policies, practices and support are crucial in implementing the SDGs as deliberations in corporate board rooms get translated into concrete projects/programs on the ground.  

Again thank you very much for your contributions in this e-discussion.

With kind regards,

Dr. Abdulghany Mohamed

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your contribution. The role of parliaments in mainstreaming the SDGs surely deserves the attention of all participantes in this e-discussion. The role radio plays in fostering discussion and engagement should not be dismissed.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. Could you tell us what you think could be done to ensure that all stakeholders engage in the national conversations you propose?

E-discussion Facilitator

WEEK 2 (March 7 – March 13, 2016) – Summary 

Thanks to all participants in this e-discussion for your insightful contribution and active engagement; may this encouraging trend continue! To recap, please see below a summary of the key points made during Week 2:

1.     How can the SDGs be effectively mainstreamed into relevant national sustainable development policies and programmes, while preserving countries' policy space to pursue national priorities? How can the UN development system best support this?

Overall, participants provided a wide range of recommendations on how to effectively mainstream the SDGs into national sustainable development policies and programmes, including:

  • Vertical policy coherence linking different levels of governance is needed: The case of Mauritania was offered as an example to highlight how lack of coordination between political bodies and governmental levels (even within the same ministry) at the national and sub national levels alike was detrimental to advancing sustainable development. This lack of coordination at the practical and strategic levels may delay the implementation of the SDGs and may make it difficult to ensure efficiency in managing foreign aid money.
  • Adapting global agenda to national context: Countries must analyze their current development strategies against the SDGs before considering implementing the 2030 Agenda nationally. In such process, the role of UN would be to propose country programs that come up with a transformative operational strategy that compliments the national plan and offers innovative solutions for development. Call for all national plans, strategies and programs to be emanated from the democratic governance principles and corruption and good governance “are the two most important elements to be considered for the success of SDG’s 2016-2030”. Furthermore, all national plans, strategies and programs must be built on democratic governance principles, human rights and lack of corruption. Additionally, countries should embed UN declarations, principles and development models in national laws, sub-regional and continental agreements & protocols. In addition to embedding the SDGs in national development plans, they should also be incorporated in annual work plans used as tools for the implementation of long term plans. The UN system could help by aligning its development assistance strategy, UNDAF, and by providing advice to local governments on mainstreaming the SDGs. The importance of having a collaborative approach to the delivery of UNDAF outcomes was also emphasized. Potential benefits of such approach: reduced duplication, increased value for money and efficiency. Example of how engagement with the government and local politicians in Zimbabwe resulted in successfully embedding the SDGs into the national development plan and the President’s Ten Point Plan.
    • Coherence with regional priorities: For an effective implementation, SDGs should be embedded in the strategic planning processes at the national and sub-national level. The national SDG agenda should be based on the regional priorities defined with the regional bodies so as to facilitate coordination and drive the achievement of a “common closer, near home goal.” There is also a need for strong regional monitoring systems to further national implementation. In this case, the UN would act to ensure that its national offices take into account regional priorities in their planning and ensure strong accountability systems. The role of UN agencies and their regional offices would be to assist member states by ensuring the coherence of planning processes at the strategic level, with national strategies supporting regional priorities. In Burundi for instance, the conflict had both a regional and a national effect, including on the economic sector.
  • Horizontal Policy Coherence Needed (i.e. multi-sector): The UN and other development partners can stimulate integrated development approaches by providing evidence and supporting the development of mainstreaming tools, thereby grounding poverty-environment mainstreaming in practice.  

 

  • Tools for mainstreaming sustainable development: An integrated approach is essential for the successful implementation of the 2030 Agenda; an approach that includes a cross-sectorial integrated approach at national and sub-national levels.  Other tools for mainstreaming sustainable development recommended in the e-discussions were:

-        Integrated cross-sectorial approach to development planning and budgeting;

-        Mainstreaming matrix for cross-cutting issues including environment and gender;

-        Tools to ensure sector plans and budgets are relevant and include objectives related to the sustainable use of natural resources;

-        Local partnerships that play an instrumental role in influencing policy development and agenda setting to further include SDGs in national and sub-national development plans and objectives and in operationalizing the mainstreaming matrix.

 

  • Localization of the Agenda: The need for a robust sub-national level implementation of SDGs and need for national governments to ensure that local governments in rural, semi-rural and urban areas have access to appropriate resources, manpower and authority is recognized within the e-discussions as necessary for SDG achievement. India is offered as an example, pointing out that local level participatory and integrated planning were important in the Indian context where grassroots level, participatory initiatives that enhanced ownerships contributed to the implementation of the MDGs. It is offered that the UN system assist member states mainstream the SDGs by providing playing a role in setting standards and advising local communities and decentralized governments in rural and urban areas to prepare their plans. Other important considerations mentioned: the needs of local communities should take priority in agenda setting; creating coordination mechanisms for data and information sharing would enhance coordination, monitoring and facilitating mechanisms; designing enabling fiscal environments is important to support the implementation of the SDGs; capacity building and the design of participatory and accountability mechanisms should be advanced.

2.     What are key areas for making progress on and building national and sub-national capacities for sustainable development, and how do they differ across country contexts (e.g. least developed countries, middle income countries, high-income countries, countries in situations of fragility etc.)? When and how can partnerships effectively contribute to capacity building and sustainable development?

  • Accountability (monitoring and reporting): National governments are key actors in the implementation of SDGs, national monitoring and reporting systems are key areas for making progress on and building national and sub-national capacities for sustainable development.
  • Good governance: Capacity building for good governance should be in focus, as well as increasing efficiency in policy development, implementation & management / use of resources. It was also mentioned that an integrated approach to social, economic and environmental sustainability requires capacity building and cross sector government coordination—and to achieve such coordination, clear leadership within the national government is required.
  • Capacity development for civil servants: In order to effectively mainstream the SDGs into relevant national sustainable development policies and programmes, capacity building is needed at all governmental levels, including skill-building for public servants.

 

  • Thematic expertise: Strengthening the sustainable development agriculture sector to protect it from seasonal and climate shocks, and achieving food security at household levels is one of the most important elements to achieving SDG. Countries should adopt development models that allow them to move beyond food insecurity and develop an agro - industrial economy. This can be achieved by using technology to improve food security, agriculture and nutrition. To tackle food insecurity challenges that climate change will bring, countries (mainly development and non industrial nations) need to invest in innovation and technology transfer that can bring both structural and nonstructural rapid changes for the agriculture sector.  The importance of natural resources governance, inclusive land use and management policies to be addressed under 2016-2030 SDG’ implementation were also emphasized. Particular attention should be paid to avoiding marginalizing vulnerable groups in national land use strategy. The participant believes that governments should be responsible for providing services in the following key areas for development:

-     Free and equitable standard health care & health insurances services; 

-     Free, quality education at primary, secondary, tertiary, college and vocational centers to build capacity; create expertise and excellence, promote innovation and research.

-     Gender equity in the educational system, the employment and work sector and social, economic and political fields.

-     Accessible, affordable & quality clean water, sanitation and energy, both in the urban and rural areas to eliminate discrepancies between livelihoods, economic classes, and geographical locations in 2016-2030.

Further areas of thematic focus for making progress on and building national and sub-national capacities for sustainable development that were identified were: peace building, inclusive democracy, quality education for all, agriculture, environment, commerce, infrastructure, industry, health care. It was also mentioned that the UN system has an important role to play by providing professional, technical, financial and thematic programme support. UN agencies can do so via capacity building packages that refer to set standards, qualities, measurements, procedures, rules and regulations in line SDG’s thematic areas (declaration, standards, protocols, principles, etc.) Going forward it was recommended that the UN should attempt to be more self-critical and innovative.

  • Importance of partnerships: Both bilateral and multilateral partnerships are seen as key to the effective implementation of the SDGs, and important to ensure consistency / relevance with the SDGs. The importance of partnerships, cooperative work towards a common goal, joint action in support of country led plans to achieve sustainable development was emphasized in the e-discussion. The Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD), an 8-country trade bloc in East Africa, was given as an example to highlight how member countries worked collaboratively to successfully implement the regional IGAD Drought Disaster Resilience Sustainability Initiative to end drought emergencies. The Global Alliance for Action for Drought Resilience and Growth as a successful example of partnership in action between donor and international partners.
  • Focus on LDCs and MICS: Least Developed Countries should have a clear vision working towards inclusive economic, political and social transformation, lead and guided by democratic political and good governance system. In order to achieve SDG implementation, middle-income countries must work on improving job creation and sustainable sources of income, promote full scale IT utilization for technological advancement and achieve improved, resilient and diversified economic system.

3.     What steps are necessary to ensure that all stakeholders, including the government, private sector and civil society can readily exchange information and experiences? How can "peer exchange" be established and nurtured?

 

  • Peer networks: Technology enabled networks should be used to share and to coordinate information, expertise and experiences, such as: interactive SDGs thematic forums, mentoring exchange between peer experts, SDGs thematic experts from developed countries mentoring their counterparts from developing countries, North South knowledge transfer initiatives, SDGs national thematic committees/forums and e-workshops or conferences. UNV’s TOKTEN (Transfer of Knowledge through Expatriate Nationals) initiative was provided as a successful example of similar initiatives. Participants also pointed out the importance of regional peer networks and South-South/Triangular Cooperation. Using existent regional economic development partnerships could be used as peer exchange networks to enhance cooperation in the achievement of SDGs. Also, expanding the scope of the SS/TC support mechanisms could be helpful in least developing country contexts, such as African countries. Participants suggested that peer exchange could be promoted through the discussion of the SDGs in regional integration blocks, also highlighting the role of South-South/Triangular cooperation in achieving the SDGs and that expanding the scope of the SS/TC support mechanisms could be an attractive proposition for all stakeholders, more so for developing countries lagging behind in trade and investment..

 

  • Mentor Systems through use of ICTs: ICTs as a means of promoting knowledge exchange and highlights the role of mentors as catalysts in the discussion. Participant suggested that SDGs thematic experts from developed countries can mentor their counterparts from developing/poor countries, there can be programmes through which youth immigrants from poor countries who live and have studied/worked in developed countries can transfer knowledge to their countries of origin.

 

  • Capacity development for ICTs: Technology, ranging from information technology to e-Learning, have a role to play in the achievement of the SDGs. Benefits include: transmitting evidence-based medicine in a variety of areas, including maternal health. ICTs “could transpose obstacles for training, information, data sharing”. To engage people in peer exchange it is necessary to provide continuous feedback on actual state, progress and achievements relevant to 2030 Agenda. For that, the UN and countries involved could use tools such as web or mobile applications based on “automated data streams condensed into multi-view dashboards showing (near) real time infographics on progress” or even use “big data showing by coverage that a specific (inter)national region is really involved” in order to get other regions involved in the exchange of experience and information.

 

  • Value of HLPF in information sharing: It was suggested that the High Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development plays an important role in information sharing, and that country reviews under the HLPF should be annual and also led by national governments with UN support. These reviews must ensure that effective participation of the civil society, the private sector, parliamentarians and sub-national governments. This is an important point that links information sharing into the HLPF, and has a link to question 2 of the third thematic window on Follow-Up and Review.
Lanre Rotimi (not verified)

Dear e-Discussion Facilitator,

Thank you for Week 2 Summary. We really commend the great work all Facilitators on this Platform are doing. If the Facilitators on the remaining Two Platforms did the same this ECOSOC e-Discussion 2016 would achieve much more. However, we have some ought against Facilitators.

We have read the Week 2 Summary. In our opinion it is not a true,  fair and transparent representation of proceedings in the past week of discussion. Key issues such as information and clarification on "One Worldwide Approach" , "asnwer to How questions", "mainstreaming" . "partnership" etc that our Institution submitted, have been conspicuously left out. The ideal Week 2 Summary of Proceedings should harvest all good ideas and pertinent suggestions generated in the discussions and synthesis same into a cohesive and concise report. Is it too much to expect Facilitators meet this ideal in the Weekly Summary disseminated?

Our view is that it is not appropriate for Facilitators to disseminate Weekly Summary that is built upon Idea(s), Suggestion(s), Approach(es) and Model(s) they are interested in. It is helpful that Facilitators disseminate Weekly Summary that is built upon Idea(s), Suggestion(s), Approach(es) and Model(s) that is in the Interest of achieving increasing convergence between Theory and Practice and increasing convergence between Global GoalsAligned and Harmonized with National Goals Vision Intention and Practice.

We are concerned that Week 2 Summary edited out good ideas and pertinent suggestions set out in a Focused Points Paper we submitted on 12 March which raised many points of interest to the Facilitators on the basis of which follow up questions were asked, such as questions on "one worldwide approach", "partnerships", "one capt fits all", "how" and"mainstreaming SDG into relevant National Sustainable Development Policies" in response to which we submitted another Focused Points Paper setting out complimentary ideas and suggestions, on 15 March at 10.29 am, that were also edited out.

It is pertinent to note that at 12.50 am on 15 March the e-Discussion Facilitator from Canada made the following comment "Thank you for your contribution and for sharing concrete suggestions on how SDGs can be effectively mainstreamed in different national contexts and on how to best address implementation challenges of the new Agenda" in response to our comments on "partnership" and "mainstreaming" follow up questions. It is therefore a puzzle to us that Week 2 Summary Posted on 15 March at 10.30 pm did not include most or all of the good ideeas and pertinent suggestions that Facilitators themselves had previously welcomed.

It is clear that What questions have been overanswered in past and ongoing UN Events including UN Events set out specifically to find answers to How questuons including the SG Report on Follow Up and Review that the PGA has asked co-Facilitators to review so that it better answer How questions.

Records showthat it is ONLY our Institutions that is ADVOCATING for How questions to be effectively answered in reality. Had the Global Consultation leading to release of SG Report on Follow Up and Review accepted most or all of our good ideas and pertient suggestions, the probability is high that the World will be talking of the Next Step - IMPLEMENTATION of the good ideas and pertinent suggestions and not going back to rewrite the SG Report on Follow Up and Review as the PGA has ordered.

If this Platform is to contribute meaningfully to this Global Consultation avoiding the same error in the Report UNDESA and UNDP will be presenting to ECSOC, the STARTING Point in taking REMEDIAL ACTION is in this Platform contributiing  and being seen to contribute meaningfully to helping over 300 UN Member States, UN System including WBG and IMF and MGoS Member CSOs'/NGOs' and Non MGoS Member CSOs/NGOs in both Developed and Developing Countries to effectively answer How questions through an updated Week 2 Summary to be posted as soon as possible that NOW includes ALL good ideas and pertinent suggestions set out in our Submissions, especially the two Focal Points Papers and similar Submissions of other Contributors / Participants that have been EDITED out of the Week 2 Summary.

For Best RESULTS the Weekly Summaries and the Final Global Consultation Outcome Document need to be a Synthesis Report that truly, fairly and transparently represent the aggregate of all good ideas and pertinent suggestions harvested from the Global Consultations. If this is DONE, we have more to contribute. Otherwise, we rest our case.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your contribution. Your suggestions on the work of facilitators will certainly help us provide better support for this discussion. Notwithstanding, a clarification is in order: the Week 2 summary comprises contributions sent to this platform from Monday, March 7th, to Sunday, March 13th, which means that all comments you quoted in your message will be included in the next weekly summary.

 

This e-discussion has been organized in such a way as to foster the free exchange of ideas. To that end, weekly reports are published to both stimulate debate and to encourage review, so the final report can be as representative as possible of the ideas and suggestions registered during this e-discussion.

Therefore, we encourage all participants to keep contributing to the debate, which also means helping facilitators to improve performance.

Lanre Rotimi (not verified)

Dear e--Discussion Facilitator from Brazil,

Thank you for prompt response and clarification. This is good encouragement. We shall make further contribution before the end of this Global Consultation, probably after the promised Weekly Summary that include the good ideas and pertient suggestions we have submitted thus far.

We are convinced that should all good ideas and pertinent suggestions harvested from this Global Consultation be processed into a Synthesis Report that is true, fair and transparent representation of proceedings, the Facilitators Synthesis Repot to ECOSOC through UNDESA and UNDP would INDEED mark Turning Point in the Great Task towards converting revised AAAA, SDG, COP21 Outcome, ECOSOC Retreat Outcome, HLPF Retreat Outcome, UN REtreat on MSP Outcome, Agenda 21 Aligned amd Harmonized with State and Local Government Development Plans and National Development Plans in over 300 UN Member States.

Once again, we commend the grteat work Facilitators on this Platform are DOING and urge other Facilitators on the Two remaining Platforms in this ECOSOC e-Discussion as well as otyher ongoing UN Events and future Events including the Global Consultation that co-Facilitators on review of SG Report on Follow Up and Review that would kick start with an interactive meeting on 17 March at 4.00pm.

Best wishes.

Jordi Baltà (not verified)

The design of multi-stakeholder partnerships and governance frameworks, involving local, regional, national and international public agencies, as well as the private sector, civil society organisations and individuals, can contribute to the exchange of information and peer-learning. Existing networks (e.g. local government associations, civil society networks, etc.) often possess experience in peer-learning methodologies and should be involved in these processes. New opportunities are also being provided by the use of the new technologies.

 

An important area that should be explored in this context is the cultural dimension of sustainable development. Over the past few years, initiatives such as the MDG-Fund’s Thematic Window on Culture and Development, UNESCO’s Hangzhou Declaration on Culture and Sustainable Development and UCLG’s Culture 21: Actions have pointed to the important role that culture can play as a driver and as an enabler of sustainable development, as also indicated in the Preamble of the 2030 Agenda. Although no specific Goal is devoted to culture in the SDGs, several explicit or implicit references to cultural aspects are included at different points (e.g. in Targets 2.5, 4.7, 8.3, 8.9, 11.4, 12.b, 16.4 and 16.10 – see this press release for further details).

 

These aspects should be integrated in coherent frameworks (e.g. through the integration of a cultural chapter or dimension in national sustainable development strategies), and the potential of cultural aspects as a ‘connector’ between different areas of sustainable development (e.g. social inclusion, environmental preservation, sustainable economic growth) should be explored.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. Existing local networks must most definitely be used to channel peer exchange on SDGs implementation. Concerning the cultural aspects of sustainable development, do you have any thoughts on how can partnerships effectively contribute to capacity building and sustainable development?

SOSSOUGA DOSSE Victor • Deputy Project Manager at ONG: Amis des Etrangers au Togo: ADET from Togo

Merci mon facilitateur,

Les activités de sensibilisation sur les ODD se feront ensemble avec des activités culturelles qui sont d'un soutien incontounable pour la réussite de l'implementation des ODD partout. Ces activités culturelles doivent être orientées vers les ODD, d'où leur renforcement, leur adaptation, leur récyclage pour les cadrer et permettre l' adhésion de la population locale, nationale et mondiale aux nouveaux objectifs du développement durable.

Swadeka Ahsun

The SDG framework should encourage some degree of transformation across dimensions of sustainability. 

To be transformative, the SDG's should capture, in the targets and goals, both the systematic and structural barriers to, and the drivers of change. In this respect, the framework does consider certain barriers/drivers such as inequality or inappropriate consumption, institutional structure and capacity.

 

However, when a narrative of change is missing, in terms of how the pursuit of specific goal would lead to broader outcomes of social change in terms of how this change is actually taking place.

All stakeholders must play an important role of management, innovation and participation in sustainable development.

Here in the United Kingdom, we have local, regional and national consultation and evaluation of policies and found that it is important to be clear and transparent,  working in partnership, in collaboration and co-operation.

It is important that developing countries and fragile states change approach in implementation of national plans and much more, global agendas by giving clear role to civil society organisations from Conceptualisation to implementation, monitoring and evaluation of development programmes.

Bilateral and trilateral ways of co-operating and working is much appreciated.

An example  is on the education of  youth and engage them in sustainable development and national policies and system Level. 

United Kingdom has achieved this, has worked with international partners and elsewhere.  Has hoped for fresh ideas, new ways of thinking, creative risk-taking, ways to raise girls and boys free from stifling stereotypes, ways of engaging them champion gender solidarity, ways of unlocking the power and resourcefulness of girls

 

There has been no time to be complacent.  It has been over twenty years since the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action was agreed and yet people continue to be disadvantaged, abused and even killed.  United Kindom and all the stakeholders should need to show determination against forces that hindering progress: discrimination, regressive ideas and harmful social norms.

 

 

 

 

 

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for you comment. Considering the UK experiece, how civil society participation can be ensured in public policy elaboration and implemention?

Daniel Plech

Hi all,

The most effective way to overcome poverty (SDG 1) and hunger (SDG 2), and reduce social inequality (SDG 10) is to promote:

1) Conditional cash transfers (with comprehensive and sophisticated net of social assistance actions to the beneficiaries);

2) Productive inclusion policies (rural and urban);

3) Universal Social services focused on equity (education, health and social care). 

To finance, a progressive tax system is essential, focusing on income and property, as done in the OECD countries.

 

Best regards.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. You have suggested means to achieve specific SDGs. What about mainstreaming the SDGs into relevant national policies and programmes? Could you tell us how the Brazilian government is dealing with the 2030 Agenda?

BNEIJARA (not verified)

Bonjour,

Dans les pays fragiles les gouvernements ne cherchent à s’occuperque du budget de l’Etat les politiques et les stratégies sont suscités par lesorganismes ou partenaires sans aucune appropriation du coté du Gouvernement.Donc les politiques et les stratégies ne sont pas portés par les Gouvernements.Les chefs d’Etats ont approuvé les ODD mais rien n’a été fait pour lesvulgariser pour qu’ils soient compris par les bénéficiaires étatiques ou Société Civile pour que la coordination et la synergie pour ce processus soit engagés. 

2016-03-16 18:11 GMT+00:00 <notification@unteamworks.org>:

You can post a reply on Te

Daniel Plech

Hi again,

The Brazilian government is engaged to accomplish all the SGDs until 2030, maintaining and improving our social policies, some of them considered models for the rest of the world. However, due to current budget restrictions and the economic recession, there are some doubts about the conditions to preserve or expand our inclusive actions, but we have to keep us confident.

By the way, see more about the Brazilian social development policies and their implementation at World Without Poverty (WWP) website: https://wwp.org.br/en (there are versions in English, Spanish, Portuguese; French soon).

The Brazil Learning Initiative for a World without Poverty (WWP) aims to identify, document and disseminate the Brazil's experience with the design and implementation of policies and programs to promote social development and poverty reduction such as Bolsa Família (cash transfer), Unified Registry (registry databases ), Brasil Without Extreme Poverty Plan (income guarantee, productive inclusion, social assistance), Continuous Welfare Benefit for the Elderly and Disabled (cash transfer and social assistance), Food Purchase Program and Cisternas Program (food security and productive inclusion), Unified Social Assistance System (social assistance), monitoring and information management, etc. 

With a view to support systematic learning and innovation regarding implementation challenges in such programs, the Government of Brazil, IPC-IG (UNDP/UNO) and the World Bank have agreed to establish a joint initiative focused on learning from the implementation of and innovations in poverty reduction programs in Brazil and sharing lessons from Brazil’s experience with the rest of the world (see sample attached.).

 

Best regards.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your answer. How about mainstreaming the MDGs/SDSGs into Brazilian national and sub-nationl policies? Can you tell us how it was done?

E-discussion Facilitator

I have the same question of the facilitator: How the Brazilian government is dealing with the implementation of the 2030 Agenda? Em 16/03/2016 15:11, notification@unteamworks.org escreveu:

You can post a reply on Teamworks by replying directly to this email. Text above this line will be included in the post.

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Posted on: E-discussion Facilitator New comment on Discussion National Implementation by E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil : Thank you for your comment.

Thank you for your comment. You have suggested means to achieve specific SDGs. What about mainstreaming the SDGs into relevant national policies and programmes? Could you tell us how the Brazilian government is dealing with the 2030 Agenda?

16 Mar 2016 [ read more ] [ reply ]

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Melaku Geleta Wakjira (not verified)

Holistic to specific corruption fighting approach &strategy

By Melaku Geleta

DRR & LR Program Coordinator

UNDP Ethiopia  

Dear facilitator and Akaaash thank you very much for bringing  the issues of corruption to the seen which in fact we all have raised in our past weeks discussions at comprehensive level . I think we need to do more probing on this to deal with issues of corruption. We need to sharpen our understanding on the subject for organized and effective solutions. It is with this understanding that I am taking some steps to elaborate the challenge and a remedial action.

General Recommendation to UN and its alliances to stop corruption 2016-2030: If we are very determine to fight corruption; I suggest the UN should think as early as possible (before SDG’s implementation) on how to bring additional UN structure such as UN corruption court with global and international mandate. UN must define international bill for corruption, set international standard to measure its international impacts, code of conduct for its management, above all needs to set international accountability measures and check and balance system between governments, public sectors, private sectors , CSO’s and the UN that must be approved by UN general assembly. To me corruption is not less than genocide, international war crime, etc. I suggest this because, corrupters are taking public resources, smuggling national resources to the third country, destroy national interests & natural resources for narrow and private needs, they use this resources for further human right abuses, where women are dying needs of clean and potable water, where children are dying of malnutrition, where thousands are choosing less dignified life standard because of unemployment, poor governances. It causes civil unrest. Hence UN should think of new structure, International corruption court. We need the general assembly to be active in these areas.

In addition to what I have recommended above, the UN should provide a chance to the international organizations or CSO’s to have a role that they can play beyond conventional consultation process. As to me, these organizations should be given a defined role to fight corruption internationally and globally. I am sure this will bring additional power to the UN to stop corruption in the coming years, SDG’s 2016-2013.The system and a framework that applied on how the CSO’s play a role needs to be defined and approved by UN general assembly. The structure suggested should go down to UN country offices, but must be deigned on how to compliment the international corruption court role at global level including corruption reporting systems.

By Melaku Geleta

DRR & LR Program Coordinator

UNDP Ethiopia  

Priscilla (not verified)

Thank you  Melaku, thank you for reiterating the corruption issue, but I think before we even add an additional strucutre such as the  International corruption court level, can we first ensure our house is in order! By this I mean ensuring we have the appropriate structures and systems to monitor achievements. I stand to be corrected but most of the international frameworks such as the SDGs, while they are endorsed by a number if not all the national states, the monitoring of progress is usually weak and limited to the member states monitoring themselves. Do we have any formed monitoring structure for the SDGs at the international/Regional level? Who reviews the various SDGs reports from the states, any system in place to support in the set-up of the various actions that the countries will come up with? I think strengthening of the mechanisms and putting up accountability systems at every level will diminish this evil of corruption, corruption thrives due to the weak systems in place which cannot even defend or strongly give evidence of any alleged corruption case, thus why in most countries corruption cases go unpunished and are rarely proven. Could UNDP, being represented in I presume most of the countries that endorsed the SDGs and 2nd on their role on aspects of governance support this process of attaining the development goals through supporting the accountability systems, this would ensure the goals and the very good visions put by the countries are not lost due to misuse of the resources provided. How do we even account for endless meetings/planning workshops/travels yet nothing tangible is seen apart from the lists of sitting allowances/perdiems?  May be on a positive note is too have a UN body review the implementation of all the previous global frameworks, to understand where actual gaps were in regards to strutures/systems that were in place to follow up on achievement, this could be used to strengthen the implementation of SDGs, most we think its inadequate financial resources but with corruption this may not even be the case?  Thank you. Priscilla

BNEIJARA (not verified)

Bonjour,Lees processus nationauxd’élaboration de de stratégie de mise en œuvre des Objectifs de développementdurable (Odd) doivent se faire dans le cadre du plan d’actions prioritaires despays. Toutes les partiesprenantes engagées dans le développement du pays doivent établir  une feuille de route, dans une démarcheparticipative et inclusive, pour élaborer une stratégie de suivi etd’évaluation  de la mise en œuvre des Odd..    Les échanges entre les acteurs engagés dans cesprocessus doivent  porté sur plusieurspoints. Parmi lesquels figure au premier rang la définition d’un cadreinstitutionnel et de redevabilité rigoureux et participatif pour le pilotageefficace des Odd intégrant le cadre harmonisé de suivi-évaluation despolitiques publiques. Ainsi que la mise en place d’un système de suivipermanent et informatisé des Odd aux niveaux local, sectoriel et national surla base d’un noyau d’indicateurs pertinents, comparables, désagrégeables pourplus d’inclusion sociale. Le renforcement des capacités des acteurs(gouvernement, élus locaux, secteur privé et société civile) dans la mise enœuvre des Odd est nécessaire. Cesacteurs ont aussi à vulgariser les Odd pour garantir une appropriation pluslarge des nouveaux enjeux par toutes les couches de la population.   17/03/2016 10:46 GMT + 00: 00 < notification@unteamworks.org > :

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Posté le: E-discussion Facilitateur Nouveau commentaire sur Discussion nationale mise en œuvre par Priscilla : Je vous remercie Melaku, je vous remercie

Merci Melaku, je vous remercie d'avoir rappelé la question de la corruption, mais je pense avant que nous ajoutons même une strucutre supplémentaires tels que le niveau international du tribunal de la corruption, pouvons - nous assurer d' abord notre maison est en ordre! Par cela , je veux dire nous assurer que nous avons les structures et systèmes appropriés pour surveiller les réalisations. Je me tiens à corriger , mais la plupart des cadres internationaux tels que les ODD, alors qu'ils sont approuvés par un certain nombre , sinon tous les Etats nationaux, la surveillance des progres! s est généralement faible et limitée aux Etats membres eux-mêmes de surveillance. Avons-nous une structure de suivi formé pour les ODD au niveau international / régional? Qui examine les différents ODD rapports des États, tout système en place pour aider à la mise en place des différentes actions que les pays venir avec? Je pense que le renforcement des mécanismes et de mettre en place des systèmes de reddition de comptes à tous les niveaux diminueront ce mal de la corruption, la corruption se développe en raison des systèmes faibles en place qui ne peut même pas défendre ou donner fortement preuve d'un cas présumé de corruption, ainsi pourquoi dans la plupart des pays , la corruption les cas restent impunis et sont rarement prouvés. Pourrait PNUD, étant représenté dans je suppose la plupart des pays qui ont adopté la ODD et 2 ème de leur rôle sur les aspects de soutien à la gouvernance de ce processus de réalisation des objectifs de développement en soutenant les systèmes de reddition de comptes, cela permettrait d' assurer les objectifs et les très bonnes visions mis par le comte! ries ne sont pas perdues en raison d' une mauvaise utilisation des ressources fournies. Comment pouvons-nous compte , même pour les ateliers sans fin réunions / planification / voyages encore rien de tangible est vu en dehors des listes de séance allocations / perdiems? Peut - être sur une note positive est trop avoir examiner un organe de l' ONU la mise en œuvre de tous les cadres mondiaux précédents, pour comprendre où les écarts réels étaient en ce qui concerne strutures / systèmes qui étaient en place pour assurer le suivi sur les résultats, ce qui pourrait être utilisé pour renforcer la mise en œuvre des ODD, plus nous pensons que ses ressources financières insuffisantes , mais la corruption cela peut même pas être le cas? Je vous remercie. Priscilla

17 mars 2016 [ lire la suite ] [ réponse ]

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Bonjour;Les processus nationauxd’élaboration de de stratégie de mise en œuvre des Objectifs de développementdurable (Odd) doivent se faire dans le cadre du plan d’actions prioritaires despays. Toutes les partiesprenantes engagées dans le développement du pays doivent établir  une feuille de route, dans une démarcheparticipative et inclusive, pour élaborer une stratégie de suivi etd’évaluation  de la mise en œuvre des Odd..    Les échanges entre les acteurs engagés dans cesprocessus doivent  porté sur plusieurspoints. Parmi lesquels figure au premier rang la définition d’un cadreinstitutionnel et de redevabilité rigoureux et participatif pour le pilotageefficace des Odd intégrant le cadre harmonisé de suivi-évaluation despolitiques publiques. Ainsi que la mise en place d’un système de suivipermanent et informatisé des Odd aux niveaux local, sectoriel et national surla base d’un noyau d’indicateurs pertinents, comparables, désagrégeables pourplus d’inclusion sociale. Le renforcement des capacités des acteurs(gouvernement, élus locaux, secteur privé et société civile) dans la mise enœuvre des Odd est nécessaire. Cesacteurs ont aussi à vulgariser les Odd pour garantir une appropriation pluslarge des nouveaux enjeux par toutes les couches de la population.   L'engagement du SNU est un gage de réussite de ces processus.-- Président ONG ADIG Tel:  0022245344811Cell: 0022246405769       00022236388360        0022222405769     

E-discussion Facilitator

Merci pour votre commentaire. Dans le cadre des Nations Unies , le Inter-agency Expert Group on SDG Indicators fournira une proposition d'un cadre global de l'indicateur qui permettra de suivre les progrès, soutenir l'élaboration des politiques et assurer la responsabilisation de tous les stakeholders.

Priscilla (not verified)

Dear Priscilla, colleagues and moderators, Again I express convergence of ideas written by Priscilla with those I take for my own analysis, remarking  on "endless meetings/planning workshops/travels yet nothing tangible is seen apart from the lists of sitting allowances/perdiems". Indeed, one gap in the Agenda 2030 is not an explicit concept that sustainable development is much more than social, economic and environmental dimensions.  Before the High Level Political Forum, when the Comission for Sustainable Development were still a voice for thoughts on sustainable development concept and indicators, the Institutional Dimension was part of the concept of sustainable development.  The 17 Goals in the Agenda 2030, apart from being totally imbricated and co-dependent among themselves (see DESA Working Paper 141 entitled "Towards Integration at Last? The Sustainable Development Goals as a Network of Targets", written by David Le Blanc, from United Nations, Division for Sustainable Development) are not conceived hierarchically, but indeed they are when we turn thoughts on how to implement them. The term 'tripple bottom line' was adopted by United Nations for easy communication, transposed from business management literature, which is a kind of a boundary institution managed by capital owners and, at the most debt owners) in which the idea of Leadership is the highest level of possibility of change.  However, when we turn to society, we cannot see it as a business organization calling for leaderships, but in fact calling for the Institutional Dimension of sustainable development which means governance, policy coherence, funding, education, social participation and updated legal and juridical frameworks. So, Priscilla, remember that the Agenda 2030 is non-binding global agreement, which means voluntary, let it be, let it happens.  On the contrary, Transpacific Partnership and other multilateral trade agreements, apart from other global trade and investment agreements are binding agreements.  When it comes for the question 'Where the money comes from?' in global concentration of wealth reinforced by those binding agreements, facing non-binding climate, environmental and social beautiful inspiring global agreements, the answer is obvious: the money shall come from capital owners and capital donors. Thus, why we insist in dreaming The World we Want?  Some people probably because of a chance of funding for "endless meetings/planning workshops/travels yet nothing tangible is seen apart from the lists of sitting allowances/perdiems".  I have long opted out from this 'carrot' over academia. And so I keep on hoping that the hearts are beating stronger because The World we Want is bringing the hearts, minds and, hopefully HANDS together. Thank you UNDP and ECOSOC for this chance of bringing voices in this typing space.  Hopefully UNDP, ECOSOC will give steps further into MOOCS, WEBINARS as to prevent us becoming dependent on air tickets, per diems and beautiful dressings and cocktails to simulate. If at least we could create better institutional conditions for policy coherence towards sustainable development goals, in local, provincial, national, international and global agreements and treaties, that is a huge step for convergence in criteria for funding and financing sustainability. Kind Regards Patricia Almeida Ashley Em 17/03/2016 07:46, notification@unteamworks.org escreveu:

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World We Want 2030

Posted on: E-discussion Facilitator New comment on Discussion National Implementation by Priscilla : Thank you  Melaku, thank you

Thank you  Melaku, thank you for reiterating the corruption issue, but I think before we even add an additional strucutre such as the  International corruption court level, can we first ensure our house is in order! By this I mean ensuring we have the appropriate structures and systems to monitor achievements. I stand to be corrected but most of the international frameworks such as the SDGs, while they are endorsed by a number if not all the national states, the monitoring of progress is usually weak and limited to the member states monitoring themselves. Do we have any formed monitoring structure for the SDGs at the international/Regional level? Who reviews the various SDGs reports from the states, any system in place to support in the set-up of the various actions that the countries will come up with? I think strengthening of the mechanisms and putting up accountability systems at every level will diminish this evil of corruption, corruption thrives due to the weak systems in place which cannot even defend or strongly give evidence of any alleged corruption case, thus why in most countries corruption cases go unpunished and are rarely proven. Could UNDP, being represented in I presume most of the countries that endorsed the SDGs and 2nd on their role on aspects of governance support this process of attaining the development goals through supporting the accountability systems, this would ensure the goals and the very good visions put ! by the countries are not lost due to misuse of the resources provided. How do we even account for endless meetings/planning workshops/travels yet nothing tangible is seen apart from the lists of sitting allowances/perdiems?  May be on a positive note is too have a UN body review the implementation of all the previous global frameworks, to understand where actual gaps were in regards to strutures/systems that were in place to follow up on achievement, this could be used to strengthen the implementation of SDGs, most we think its inadequate financial resources but with corruption this may not even be the case?  Thank you. Priscilla

17 Mar 2016 [ read more ] [ reply ]

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Ramit Basu • Independent Development Sector Consultant at Not affiliated to any organization from India

 

Quite a pertinent comment from Priscilla and I would like to again emphasise the building up of community level monitoring structures and systems which ultimately feeds into regional to national and ultimately to global monitoring systems. It might sound cumbersome but will eradicate the possibility of fudging of data or misrepresentation of facts to a great extent.

Most importantly will allow local governments and community systems to have a say in the utilization of funds, how it is used and how better could it be used. It would also bring to light initiatives taken by the communities themselves without external support and the impact vis a vis external funding. 

India has tried community moniroting systems like the social audit which has now been institutionalized as part of programme design. Examples of community monitoring systems tried across the world can also be looked into to develop a robust bottom up system.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. Local governments and communities area important stakeholders for the 2030 Agenda. Do you believe community engagement can lead to mainsteaming of the SDGs into national policy? If so, how? Could you tell us more about your experience with community monitoring in India?

Priscilla (not verified)

Dear Colleagues and the moderator, thank you for the great conversation. I have gained a lot from you all. To respond to a few comments in regards to the agenda 2030 being non abiding, I agree however as we are utilizing funds from the tax payers we have to be accountable, including too to the beneficiaries , 2nd being an agenda with goals to be achieved , with states at different levels then guiding frameworks and standards as earlier indicated by Abiodun, from LITRON system and consultants, have to be in place, this would ensure coherence at Regional/global level, as failure of one nation has as an impact to its neighbours thus again I will emphasize on a Regional approach and in particular in the LDC , land locked and those that have to rely heavily on others for services/supplies. Achievement of this agenda especially in conflict areas, in areas with high displacement (IDPs) and refugees to neighbouring states will only succeed when a Regional outlook will be in place through the already existing Regional blocks.

To add my input on my experience of community monitoring, in the Horn of Africa Region this process has not been an easy one. The participatory monitoring, evaluation and learning in the community managed approach which we have followed over time was at many times hijacked/led by the well-off and influential members of the community who at most times did not bother to consult with the most vulnerable, other aspect was the lack of adequate consultation by organisations (international and national including too government) with community members for various reasons ranging from inadequate facilitation process , weak situation analysis thus failing to identify the actual needs, and lastly due to uncoordinated  and competing efforts among multiple players which have no link to the local authority. Community monitoring as long as there is inequality is a difficult task and this is where true leadership and guidance is required to ensure the community engagement process is well balanced to allow the weak, marginalised and poor in any society can have their views expressed.

In addition, member states should, in their development budgets enable the monitoring and review process to take place regularly either through exchange visits, regional learning forums where states can further discuss their progress. Institutions of higher learning would be of value in facilitating such meetings.

To conclude, the mid-term review of the SDG’s, and where possible any other review, should be conducted in the presence of high level statesmen, who should be representatives of the heads of state who endorsed the agenda.  Thank you, Priscilla

Priscilla (not verified)

Dear Priscilla, cc Moderators and colleagues When I read what you write, I think: "Wow,  that is Brazil!  Oh, sorry, she is from Kenya!  So, it is the same impressions I have."  Thus, it is not something of a national feature, it is both something human (psichological/Neurological/cognition/cultural) and, also, transnational. Thank you for sharing, gratefull for learning from this multicultural learning environment offered by UNDP and ECOSOC. Kind Regards Patricia Almeida Ashley Universidade Federal Fluminense - Brazil www.ecopoliticas.uff.br www.ecocidades.uff.br www.intsr.uff.br Skype patricia.almeida.ashley Em 19/03/2016 15:36, notification@unteamworks.org escreveu:

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World We Want 2030

Posted on: E-discussion Facilitator New comment on Discussion National Implementation by Priscilla DRR Programme Officer from Kenya : Dear Colleagues and the

Dear Colleagues and the moderator, thank you for the great conversation. I have gained a lot from you all. To respond to a few comments in regards to the agenda 2030 being non abiding, I agree however as we are utilizing funds from the tax payers we have to be accountable, including too to the beneficiaries , 2nd being an agenda with goals to be achieved , with states at different levels then guiding frameworks and standards as earlier indi! cated by Abiodun, from LITRON system and consultants, have to be in place, this would ensure coherence at Regional/global level, as failure of one nation has as an impact to its neighbours thus again I will emphasize on a Regional approach and in particular in the LDC , land locked and those that have to rely heavily on others for services/supplies. Achievement of this agenda especially in conflict areas, in areas with high displacement (IDPs) and refugees to neighbouring states will only succeed when a Regional outlook will be in place through the already existing Regional blocks.

To add my input on my experience of community monitoring, in the Horn of Africa Region this process has not been an easy one. The participatory monitoring, evaluation and learning in the community managed approach which we have followed over time was at many times hijacked/led by the well-off and influential members of the community who at most times did not bother to consult with the most vulnerable, other aspect was the lack of adequate consultation by organisations (international and national including too government) with community members for various reasons ranging from inadequate facilitation process , weak situation analysis thus failing to identify the actual needs, and lastly due to uncoordinated  and competing efforts among multiple players which have no link to the local authority. Community monitoring as long as there is inequality is a difficult task and this is where true leadership and guidance is required to ensure the community engagement process is well balanced to allow the weak, marginalised and poor in any society can have their views expressed.

In addition, member states should, in their development budgets enable the monitoring and review process to take place regularly either through exchange visits, regional learning forums where states can further discuss their progress. Institutions of higher learning would be of value in facilitating such meetings.

To conclude, the mid-term review of the SDG’s, and where possible any other review, should be conducted in the presence of high level statesmen, who should be representatives of the heads of state who endorsed the agenda.  Thank you, Priscilla

19 Mar 2016 [ read more ] [ reply ]

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E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. Concerning your thoughts on reviewing of sustainable development global frameworks, it is important to point out that two entities within the UN have been playing a major role:  the Inter-agency and Expert Group on Sustainable Development Goal Indicators (IAEG-SDGs) will “provide a proposal of a global indicator framework (and associated global and universal indicators) for consideration by the Statistical Commission at its forty-seventh session in March 2016” (check: http://unstats.un.org/sdgs/iaeg-sdgs); thile the High-level Political Forum on Sustainable Development has “a central role in overseeing a network of follow-up and review processes at the global level, working coherently with the General Assembly, ECOSOC and other relevant organs and forums, in accordance with existing mandates. It will facilitate sharing of experiences, including successes, challenges and lessons learned, and provide political leadership, guidance and recommendations for follow-up.." (check: https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/hlpf).

Melaku Geleta Wakjira (not verified)

The Role of the UN in SDG’s mainstreaming both at policy and implementation level.

By: Melaku Geleta

DRR & LR Program Coordinator

UNDP Ethiopia              

Dear moderator, thank you for a request for elaborations. I think, as UN we have been giving a technical supports in the past for so many years. But this time, the support from the UN to countries must go beyond giving a support for what all proposed by governments. The technical support from the UN agencies, especially in policy development and SDG’s mainstreaming should be a challenging, a facilitative and follow a mutual accountable process. I suggest these approaches because; sometimes the development policies are derived by ‘individual’s ambitions” regardless of addressing the national context, reality or priorities for which the UN must be equally accountable. Meager resources are utilized for not national priority interventions or less strategic agendas. We have to make a clear demarcation between “commercial & needy” agendas.  There are some observation that, countries with less human and financial resources are found to be the most extravagant one in using national resources for less priority programs, because of its commercial advantage regardless of its neediness. In addition to UNDAF development sessions, I suggest, the UN country offices must play a pivotal role and initiate joint priority setting sessions, through giving technical support in the areas of commissioning big researches, inviting research institutions to step in as a solution providers, injecting and trade meaningful international cooperation’s, informed policy development practices, in depth problem analysis, through giving sharpened recommendations etc. While countries prepare development policies, or implement policies, this must be considered from SDG’s mainstreaming angle. If the UN failed to provide such technical support to the countries, it is clear that less relevant policies will continue to be implemented to heal the symptom without addressing the root causes, which is not the case of SDG’s 2016-2030.

On top of the upper policy level engagements, depends up on the specific country structures, it is wise to cascade down to the subnational, regional or sub regional level the notion behind SDG’s mainstreaming. Once the policy level task is properly managed, the UN support at implementation level must be well defined and prepared as parts of SDG’s implementation and mainstreaming packages. I believe the UN could delivery on the later one as well because there are at least 1 and more than 1 UN agencies responsible to give a technical support to one of the 17 SDG’s. In these contexts, the SDG’s mainstreaming challenges would be solved at two levels (at policy and implementation levels). For the later one the implementation package is critically important to assure to what extend the SDG’s are mainstreamed.

Melaku Geleta

DRR & LR Program Coordinator

UNDP Ethiopia              

            

 

 

James WAKIAGA • Economics Advisor at UNDP

Allow me to add my voice to Melaku's proposition on the imperative of SDG mainstreaming. There is no doubt that  countries like Ethiopia where I serve did well in the achievement of MDGs because  they mainstremed the MDGs in the national development strategies. Likewise the country had an ambitious strategy on the localization of the MDGs as well as in setting an MDG fund that was used to support heath, education, water and sanitation across the regions. In my view, we dont need to reinvent the wheeel, and we need to draw lessons from the success stories during the \mdg implementation. In this regard, Ethiopia for example, with the support of DEAS and UNDP was able to embark on the mainstreming of the SDGs during the preparation of the current medium term strategy (GTP II) (2015/16-2019/20) and  moving forward is to ensure that all the priority SDGs are clearly linked to the GTP as well defining some of the benchmarks in setting indicators. I believe this is going to be a proces, rather than an event, and ideally is to concurrently pursue a strong agenda on sensitization, policy advocacy, as well as , a robust Mand E framework to monitor the results. I fully subscribe to the notion that country contexts will to a large extent define our aproaches but no doubt established UNDG guidelines on how we approach the SDGs rollout will continue to  be very helpful. The  national ownership of the processes can not be overemphasized and this ought to go beyond  governments to involve private sector and civil society players who are major stakeholders in the achievement of the SDGs given that they were all involved in formulation of the goals. 

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your contribution. Promoting national ownership is essential in ensuring success for development policies and project. Could you tell us how national ownership was achieved in Ethiopia during the mainstreaming and implementation of the MDGs?

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for you comment. Concerning the need to "cascade down to the subnational, regional or sub regional level the notion behind SDG’s mainstreaming", you should check Amarakoon Bandara portrait on Zimbabwe planning approach:

 

Amarakoon Bandara AMARAKOON Economic Advisor, UNDP from ZimbabweThu, March 10, 2016 at 01.17 pm

As most development policies are implemented through national development plans, it is logical to mainstream SDGs through such plans and strategies. When the national development plans are already in place, an entry point could be annual work plans that are used as tools for the implementation of long term plans. UN could support this in two ways: first is to assist the governments in the design of such plans and strategies that are aligned to achieve SDGs in the long run. Secondly, UN could align its development assistance strategy, UNDAF, to achieve SDGs. Our experience suggest the need for improvement in the delivery of UNDAF outcomes in a more collaborative manner for better results even in countries where Delivering as One is operational. Such an approach not only enhance synergies among UN agencies but also avoid duplication for greater value for money. It is also important to ensure that national efforts to achieve SDGs are linked to the national budgetary process for greater development outcomes. Engagement with Parliamentarians on SDGs through outreach and support to the establishment of Parliamentary Committees on SDGs could help in this regard. In Zimbabwe, UNDP has supported the government in preparing a Zimbabwe Position Paper on SDGs that is linked to the national development plan and the Ten Point Plan of the President. An Acceleration Action Plan for SDG 2 has also been drafted in consultation with provincial level officials. A dialogue with Parliamentarians is planned for raising awareness on the role of Parliamentarians in advancing the SDG implementation process, how they could champion SDGs at the national level and taking SDGs to their respective constituencies.

The micro level implementation of national development policies and strategies will involve sub-national entities. Yet, in most developing countries such sub-national institutional arrangements are weak to undertake broader development initiatives such as the SDGs. Strengthening capacities for Sub-national planning and implementation would help deliver results on the ground. Building strong partnerships and collaboration with local authorities, especially when resource flows from the center to the local bodies are very limited, would be critical to make a difference in development outcomes. These partnerships could be more effective if it starts right from the beginning. Given the stronger role expected from the non-governmental sector in achieving SDGs, it is paramount to strengthen the partnership with all stakeholders, including donors, the private sector and the civil society.

Most countries are members of regional blocks, typically targeting cooperation towards strengthened economic development. This could be a window for peer exchange. An initiative to get regional blocks to discuss how they should cooperate to achieve the SDGs would allow them to explore such exchange. This is in fact nothing but part of a South-South/Triangular cooperation. We have seen an increase in SS/TC with positive effects on development in developing countries at low cost, but they tend to be isolated and negligible compared to the needs, especially in Africa. Although the UN provides support in promoting SS/TC, its focus is narrow moving away from central themes- trade and investment- where the majority of SS/TC opportunities exist. Expanding the scope of the SS/TC support mechanisms could be an attractive proposition for all stakeholders, more so for developing countries lagging behind in trade and investment.

BNEIJARA (not verified)

Bonjour,

Les enseignements tirés de ces échanges  nous ont permis de réfléchir ensemble à la mise en œuvre des ODD au niveau national. Il ressort des contributions  que la réalisation de ces objectifs tient fondamentalement de l’action coordonnée des Gouvernements, du secteur privé et de la Société civile à traduire ces ODD dans ces actions concrètes et des politiques publiques claires et efficaces qui passeront par l’élaboration de feuilles de route nationales. Il revient aux décideurs et aux planificateurs à l’échelle nationale et locale d’intégrer les ODD dans leurs stratégies et documents de planification. Il faut un renforcement de capacité des acteurs leur permettant l’intégration de  tous les aspects pertinents pour une meilleure opérationnalisation des ODD à savoir : l’appropriation des objectifs, des accords qui y sont liés, des outils de gestion de la durabilité et les techniques et méthodes d’alignement des ODD aux politiques nationales et sectorielles. Cela loin des disputes, des discussions  passant rapidement à l’action.

E-discussion Facilitator

Merci, encore une fois, pour vos contributions positives à notre e- discussion.

Abiodun Ogundipe (not verified)

Dear Moderator, I beleive in inter_relationship. UN should set  a standard for all nations to meet. if there is a standard being set up. Monitoring and Evaluation can the then come in by the UN.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. You have raised tow important issues. In what regards "standards for all nations to meet", it is important to notice that the 2030 Agenda is a "a plan of action for people, planet and prosperity [that sets a] comprehensive, far-reaching and people-centred set of universal and transformative Goals and targets". The work of the UN's Statistics Division on building a global indicator framework that will be critical to achieve the SDGs worldwide (check http://unstats.un.org/sdgs/).

Concerning the monitoring and evaluation role of the UN, the High-level Political Forum on Sustainable Development "will have a central role in overseeing a network of follow-up and review processes at the global level, working coherently with the General Assembly, ECOSOC and other relevant organs and forums, in accordance with existing mandates. It will facilitate sharing of experiences, including successes, challenges and lessons learned, and provide political leadership, guidance and recommendations for follow-up. It will promote system-wide coherence and coordination of sustainable development policies. It should ensure that the Agenda remains relevant and ambitious and should focus on the assessment of progress, achievements and challenges faced by developed and developing countries as well as new and emerging issues. Effective linkages will be made with the follow-up and review arrangements of all relevant UN Conferences and processes, including on LDCs, SIDS and LLDCs." (check: https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/hlpf).

Abiodun Ogundipe (not verified)

I think this is a project towards year 2030, there is what is called problem definition. Project management ideas should be applied to solve all problems and analysing all the problems will also help out in achiecving these goals and objectives towards year 2030.

Alka BHATIA • Economics Advisor at UNDP

Appreciate the richness of ideas that have come through in this process. The discussion forum is timely as it allows learning and exchange of ideas.

In hindsight the process of arriving at an agreement on the SDGs looks relatively straightforward as we look to roll out the implementation phase! There is a universal acknowledgement of the basic principles of coordination, multi-sectorality and good governance that are critical for successful implementation; however the challenge lies in promoting a common understanding of the larger objective and the roles for different stakeholders at all levels: the need for individual and collective ownership. Above all ensuring the transparency and accountability necessary in the process to stay on course. What is perhaps a key issue then is to get a common understanding and agreement that the involvement of people from the grassroots, up and across, needs to be promoted. Some examples have already been provided that where such an involvement takes place success in achieving goals is guaranteed. The UN system needs to and is in a position to catalyze this process working with different stakeholders.

Mainstreaming the SDGs into national development plans and integrating them also at the sub-national level requires an intensive process of prioritisation and in my view sequencing. This is particularly true in LDCs with limited resources, both human and capital. Various tools are available for this in addition to guidance on vertical and horizontal coherence of policy frameworks. This is not new and is the classic approach to planning for sustainable development; however in most cases we have had limited success as evidenced in the uneven progress on the MDGs, possibly due to inadequate practice of these fundamental principles. Further, to achieve appropriate mainstreaming, due diligence on priority setting is required: selecting indicators that together will facilitate achievement of a few priority goals needs to be a focused evidence based process rather than just being a broad based consultative process.  A ‘systems thinking’ approach is necessary to achieve the integrated goals for sustainable and enduring development. There is need for improved synchronization in planning processes, both vertical and horizontal as well as rationalization of implementing structures at the national and sub national levels.

The foregoing also requires strong leadership, not only at the national and sub national level but also within the UN and within the private sector and civil society, including academia. In addition, we need to also have champions, who will guide, lead and exemplify multi-sectorality and integrated approaches that will leave no one behind. 

Alka BHATIA • Economics Advisor at UNDP

Dear Alka BHATIA Economics Advisor, moderators and colleagues I signed all paragraphs you wrote in your comments. Brilliant synthesis of our shared concerns in this e-discussion and clearly appropriate recommendations. Kind Regards Patricia Almeida Ashley www.intsr.uff.br (Reserach Group´s international cooperation) www.ecocidades.uff.br (Research Group´s outreach community projects www.ecopoliticas.uff.br (Research Group main website) - Nucleo de Estudos em EcoPoliticas e EConsCiencias Department of Geoenvironmental Analysis - Institute of Geosciences Universidade Federal Fluminense Niteroi - RJ - Brazil Em 18/03/2016 05:21, notification@unteamworks.org escreveu:

In hindsight the process of arriving at an agreement on the SDGs looks relatively straightforward as we look to roll out the implementation phase! There is a universal acknowledgement of the basic principles of coordination, multi-sectorality and good governance that are critical for successful implementation; however the challenge lies in promoting a common understanding of the larger objective and the roles for different stakeholders at all levels: the need for individual and collective ownership. Above all ensuring the transparency and accountability necessary in the process to stay on course. What is perhaps a key issue then is to get a common understanding and agreement that the involvement of people from the grassroots, up and across, needs to be promoted. Some examples have already been provided that where such an involvement takes place success in achieving goals is guaranteed. The UN system needs to and is in a position to catalyze this process working with diffe! rent stakeholders.

Mainstreaming the SDGs into national development plans and integrating them also at the sub-national level requires an intensive process of prioritisation and in my view sequencing. This is particularly true in LDCs with limited resources, both human and capital. Various tools are available for this in addition to guidance on vertical and horizontal coherence of policy frameworks. This is not new and is the classic approach to planning for sustainable development; however in most cases we have had limited success as evidenced in the uneven progress on the MDGs, possibly due to inadequate practice of these fundamental principles. Further, to achieve appropriate mainstreaming, due diligence on priority setting is required: selecting indicators that together will facilitate achievement of a few priority goals needs to be a focused evidence based process rather than just being a broad based consultative process.  A ‘systems thinking’ approach is necessary to ach! ieve the integrated goals for sustainable and enduring development. There is need for improved synchronization in planning processes, both vertical and horizontal as well as rationalization of implementing structures at the national and sub national levels.

The foregoing also requires strong leadership, not only at the national and sub national level but also within the UN and within the private sector and civil society, including academia. In addition, we need to also have champions, who will guide, lead and exemplify multi-sectorality and integrated approaches that will leave no one behind. 

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. You have surely summarized some of the questions raised in this e-discussion. You have also mentioned that strong leadership is necessary to facilitate national implementation of the 2030 Agenda. Following this line of reasoning, Bneijara, from Mauritania, suggested that country representatives in the High-level Political Forum on Sustainable Development could act as focal point for national level coordination of the 2030 Agenda. In your opinion, how can leadership and “champions” be fostered within the Agenda 2030 stakeholders so as to allow for the SDGs to be mainstreamed into national policies?

Lanre Rotimi (not verified)

In response to points made by Advisor UNDP Malawi and e-Discussion Facilitator from Brazil's follow up question, we wish to make the following comments:

Our Study Finding is that for Policy Makers / Decision Makers on over 300 UN Member States, UN System including WBG and IMF, MGoS Member CSOs/NGOs and Non MGOS Member CSOs/NGOs to JOINTLY find correct answers to revised AAAA, SDG, COP21 Outcome, UN Retreat on MSP Outcome, ECOSOC Retreat Outcome, HLPF Retreat Outcome, Agenda 21 Aligned and Harmonized with Stale and Local Governments Development Plans and National Development Plans How questions, the follow Conditions MUST be met:-1. Conversion of each Vision Document into Strategy, into Policies, into Programs, into Projects at Community/Village to Global levels.2. Interventions in (1) will have Common Frameworks, Processes, Systems, Structures, Formats adapted to suit the unique and specific needs of each Context / Location.3. Activities in (2) will the Driven by Known Approach with Clear Principles, Instruments corresponding to each Principle, Practices and Database and there will be Clear Statement on:-  a) Calendar of Events  b) Who Does What  c) Who Pays for What  d) Where each Stakeholder is Now (A)  e) Where each Stakeholder needs to be when Vision is achieved on Target Date (B)  f) How to Move from (A) to (B)It will be recalled that PGA has asked Co-Facilitators to review SG Report on Follow Up and Review and to produce a Report for endorsement at HLPF 2016 in July. If C-Facilitators are to ensure that the Report they submit indeed answer How questions this time, can this be done without addressing all fundamental issues we consistently raise?Assuming that the co_Facilitators get it Right this time. Would it not be embarrassing to discover during or after HLPF 2016 that the following complementary Activities ought to have taken place simultaneously:The Review of SG Report on Data Revolution November 2014 and Review of SG Synthesis Report December 2014. The Review of these Three SG Reports should be Driven by Revolutions that produce 10 SG Reports:-1. SG Report on Planning 2. SG Report on Implementation3. SG Report on Monitoring4. SG Report on Evaluation5. SG Report on Data 6. SG Report on Digitization7. SG Report on Development Research 8. SG Report on Development Communications9. SG Report on Performance Management 10. SG Report on Measures of SuccessThere will be an IEAG, IEAG Secretariat and Website supporting the production of each Report and all that follows. The IEAG, IEAG Secretariat and Website for Data Revolution will be Re-established. The IEAG, IEAG Secretariat and Website for remaining 9 Revolutions will be Established. These 10 Revolutions will be supported by the following Pillars:-1. Bringing Whole of World/Region/Country/Bank/Institution/Government Thinking to bear towards the Sustainable Solutions to Whole of World/Region?Country/Bank/Institution/Government Problems.2. Leave No One Behind3. Business Unusual and Change for Best4. Mainstreaming revised Global Goals into National Goals5. Correct Diagnosis, Prescription, Surgery and Recovery Management6. Internal Consultants and External Consultants Support Network7. One Worldwide Approach that is Not One Cap fit All but One Worldwide Common and Systemic Approach to (1) - (6) adopted by 306 UN Member States, UN System including WBG and IMF, MGoS Member CSOs/NGO and Non MGoS Member CSOs/NGOs.In sum, National and World Leaders need to recognize that National / World Sustainable Development is all about Development Faith:-Development Faith Brings Something out of NothingDevelopment Faith Can Perform Great ThingsDevelopment Faith Can DO the ImpossibleDevelopment Faith is the Foundation of Development HopeDevelopment Hope is the Foundation of Development LoveDevelopment Love is the MASTER KEY to achieve National and Global VisionsSee What Albert Einstein had to say on the Subject of Lovehttp://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/neglected-universal-force-peace-and-stability-love#comment-6229and What Ambassador Power, US Permanent Representative to UN had to say on Access to Justicefile:///C:/Users/MR%20LANRE%20PC/Downloads/20160224%20-%20SP%20-%20Remarks%20on%20Access%20to%20Legal%20Aid%20as%20a%20Measure%20of%20%20Access%20to....pdf For once, Can we STOP Talking and Thinking and STAT ACTION and ACCOMPLISHMENT. The Future of our Fragile Planet could Depend on Making this IMPORTANT SHIFT and on Time.To answer specific question on "how can leadership and “champions” be fostered within the Agenda 2030 stakeholders so as to allow for the SDGs to be mainstreamed into national policies?" directly, we will share our thoughts in the Focused Points Paper that we shall post next week after Week 3 Summary that does justice to all good ideas and pertinent suggestions harvested in Week 3 discussions have been posted.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thankl you for your comments on the role of the UN in reviewing basic Agenda 2030 documents and reports in order to address practical ways of implementing the SDGs worldwide.

Abiodun Ogundipe (not verified)

Fighting corruption in all nations should not be main issue as it in Nigeria and other countries. There are other things that can facilitate progress for any nation. What is causing corruption is mismanagement of funds. If strategies are well mapped out for disbursement of cash in any nation there would not be corruption I think. All is lack of strategies by nations leaders. Abiodun Ogundipe Nigeria

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. Besides capacity building on budget elaboration and monitoring, what other areas do you believe are key for making progress on and building national and sub-national capacities for sustainable development?

Antonio Roque (not verified)

In the future world, we all care about each other, nations and people in a dynamic wheel of intelligently and strategically sharing each others burdens, the brotherhood of humanity in a gigantic wheel of affection and balance, no one shall be left behind due to the gravity of love and shared resources that are get technologically being acquired preserving the planet. Maybe reaching the point where everyone in the planet is entitled to a very small and basic monthly salary to guarantee minimum survival, continuity, spiritual and human evolution and economical activation, unlocking an intelligent growth engine, by sovereignty enforcement or donated funds. Poverty is everywhere in this planet in rich or poor countries.

Legal and technological systems can be used to channel diplomatic, security, political, institutional and business resolutions via the UN SDG and to achieve this we would need:

1. The self-government – freedom, spirituality, self-control, sense of duty, wisdom, openness and moral from citizens.

2. The local government-supportive to NGOs

3. The regional government-countries

4. The United Nations Parliamentary system of the people for earth, space and universal affairs, en.unpacampaign.org

5. The supporting NGOs from all over the world

6. The United nations organizations

7. The United Nations – for the nations

8. Supporting groups of countries by their status:

– G20

– Fragile state groups

– BRICS

– Commercial state groups

–         And others…

 

The UN with the SDG is able to ensure balanced policy coherence by diversity and understanding strategic country needs as a pickup for future progress and frame, each country and UN organisation with a specific studied case of integration of the SDG.

The United nations and each of the UN organisations would present and negotiate a designed program with each government under the SDG. What are the most important SDG to that country? How can we integrate the SDG in a win-win situation; key pickup points are important to value and integrate the SDG program.

The UN could also operate a quantum computer ex:www.dwavesys.com to analyse and monitor trade, data from several sources for example analysing the traffic of commodities like in a traffic light system, monitoring the progress of the SDG worldwide by all the sources etc… having more efficient view and transparency of what is happening.

 

Country integration should be done by jointly UN, UN organisations and governments work together side by side to understand the main key points of action and the main key SDG more important to that country; the country would nominate some body or person to lead the negotiations and create this joint project and study. Starting by a proposal from the UN. Probably the UN could have a representative in the parliament of that country.

Exchanging and communicating via a cloud platform with video, chat, messaging, documents exchange etc..

The program for the types of country would have to be deeply analyzed having all factors in case, economical development, levels of poverty, technological awareness, cultural and spiritual orientation, environmental and industrial progress etc…studies have to be made and global opinions have to be collected and final decisions with countries for joint project development to target local areas have to be made.

 

At local level the UN would have to have in reference the government to work with the local private and public organisations of the country, the NGOs and ECOSOC NGOS would be able to help and integrate as well and and this local organisations are the ones that should report progress directly to the UN with the government awareness.

All this can be done with joint government development and diplomacy, creating and integrating the needs of the country with SDG, getting reports and monitoring with local private-public organizations, creating awareness campaigns to the people and using technologically quantum computing power, cloud solutions and platforms

 

www.wapo-int.org

 

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comments on how the UN development system can support the implementation of the SDGs at the country level. Considering that the role of the UN is a supportive one and that countries must define their own policies on the 2030 Agenda, how do you think can "peer exchange" be established and nurtured at the national and sub-national levels?

Henry Nnadozie Ekwuruke • Executive Director and Chief Consultant at Development Generation Africa International from Nigeria

Thank you all for your great contributions. Some of our staff at Development Generation Africa (DGAi) believe we have to promote understanding of the #SDGs with the common man's language and our Chief Administrative Officer, Austin Eluwa opined that, "no president, no leader or emperor is going to achieve the #SDGs except with the people, powered by women and youth." He also talked of the experience of the 'elders' in monitoring, implementing the goals. Let's move for those results now. Together! Thank you.

 

Henry Ekwuruke, Executive Officer at DGAi

NGO in Consultative Status with ECOSOC and promotes social dialogue and human rights!

Henry Nnadozie Ekwuruke • Executive Director and Chief Consultant at Development Generation Africa International from Nigeria

Dear Henry Nnadozie Ekwuruke (Development Generation Africa International, from Nigeria), cc moderators and colleagues, In Brazil, Prof. Jose Eli da Veiga leaded the development of a webbased learning environment on the SDG´s called Sustentaculos.  Have a look at http://www.sustentaculos.pro.br/  (a Platform for contents on sustainability) Kind Regards Patricia Almeida Ashley www.intsr.uff.br www.ecocidades.uff.br www.ecopoliticas.uff.br Universidade Federal Fluminense Niteroi - RJ - Brazil   Em 19/03/2016 15:56, notification@unteamworks.org escreveu:

You can post a reply on Teamworks by replying directly to this email. Text above this line will be included in the post.

World We Want 2030

Posted on: E-discussion Facilitator New comment on Discussion National Implementation by Henry Nnadozie Ekwuruke " Human rights activist/writer, blogger & entrepreneur /" Executive Director at Development Generation Africa International from Nigeria : Thank you all for your great

Thank you all for your great contributions. Some of our staff at Development Generation Africa (DGAi) believe we have to promote understanding of the #SDGs with the common man's language and our Chief Administrative Officer, Austin Eluwa opined that, "no president, no leader or emperor is going to achieve the #SDGs e! xcept with the people, powered by women and youth." He also talked of the experience of the 'elders' in monitoring, implementing the goals. Let's move for those results now. Together! Thank you.

 

Henry Ekwuruke, Executive Officer at DGAi

NGO in Consultative Status with ECOSOC and promotes social dialogue and human rights!

19 Mar 2016 [ read more ] [ reply ]

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E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your contribution. Does your organization have suggestions on how to engange stakeholders in the exchange information and experiences that could help achieve the SDGs?

Henry Nnadozie Ekwuruke • Executive Director and Chief Consultant at Development Generation Africa International from Nigeria

To engage stakeholders and share information and experiences effectively for the achievement of the SDGs, I asked two of my colleagues for input and they responded in a timely manner: 

WE have to reach our networks and inform them; organise forums; utilize the social media and traditional media and get leaders to endorse the goals and "lead by example", people need to discuss and take action together. During the international women's day in Nigeria, DGAi installed some women as "Torchbearers of the #SDGs" with the Solar Light we used in New York! They have since helped spread the message to their colleagues and networks and in the media. We can do more with better support and motivation. We have to educate and create awareness within the Partners for Peace Network and other circles like involving my Bishop in Church to talk about the goals. We also want "habits" changed. Thanks

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for the practical example on the role of leadership in promoting stakeholders engagement and the sharing of knowledge and experiences in order to achieve the SDGs at the country level.

Henry Nnadozie Ekwuruke • Executive Director and Chief Consultant at Development Generation Africa International from Nigeria

At the DGAi, we are practical and we think that what is most important is not talk but action. Our job moves forward when we do it. National implementation is a job for a "doing" presidet and all relevant stakeholders. We propose the creation of "Action 2030" Ministry at the national level to move the SDGs from commitment to results, from talk to concrete action. Thank you

Priscilla (not verified)

Hi Henry , thank you for your input and the need for result oriented lookout. However tend to wonder whether or not an extra ministry will make the agenda move. What I think ,is having the SDGs where so far have not yet been embedded into any ministry be included in the highest ministry that has more power and authority, thus this should be in the offices of the President or Prime minister . The SDGs cuts across all the ministries and thus should be governed from the top for coherence across all sectors and vertically from the National to the Grassroots . The creation of an extra ministry may make the SDGs just be an agenda of that ministry rather than for the Nation as a whole. I see the role of civil society organizations very key in ensuring the agenda implementation moves in full force and monitoring too for achievement of its goal, civil society groups should remain the eyes and voice of the people in particular those whose voices are never heard. Last when you say you are practical what tools or how do you ensure you achieve your goals despite the resource competitive world we are in? How do you ensure the state/it's ministries delivers and communities are fully engaged? Thank you . Priscilla

Henry Nnadozie Ekwuruke • Executive Director and Chief Consultant at Development Generation Africa International from Nigeria

Hi Priscillia, I write to inform you that your namesake in our office just game birth to a baby girl 6 hours ago! We are working towards engaging the legislators in building transparency and accountability across the SDGs and we already started the distribution of the Agenda 2030 to relevant stakeholders. My state government is working on that lead with the document! We aim to reach the University Vice Chancellors across Nigeria to make them Champions of the Goals and our own Agenda 2063!

At the DGAi, we wanted a new ministry to face the agenda head-on and we recognise your point and we may have a rethink. We want no one to be left behind, we want inclusive and not exclusivity. At DGAi, we work with responsibility, cooperation, vision, selfless, fraternity and solidarity and courage. This is our success. Communities wants involved and must be included. It is a matter of awareness and action then participation leads to responsibility. We have formed a volunteer front "Torchbearers of #SDGs" they manifest the SDGs and work for sustainable development through self-help and promotion of sustainable community development led by women and youth.

We aspire to a society where better services, including basic health and education is a reality for all. We know we can! Thank you and let's do it together.

Priscilla (not verified)

Thank you Henry and the good news of my name sake, my congratulations to her and the family and welcome the Baby Girl. This should motivate us more to ensure the set goals enable every New Child in this world despite their gender, background is in a better place, a well organized and a caring, planned environment than we found it, especially in the LDCs let's say no more to poverty and inequality. Reason why partnerships and coordination among the various sectors and our politics have to move into a higher level from what we have observed, defining clearly the rules for engagement and letting humanity be what it was intended to be .National level commitment to achieve SDGs among the various sectors, private and public should be endorsed at this level and not just assumed, partnership with clear legal mandate where one accounts for the progress they make! All the very best with the initiatives in place and hopefully midway in implementation we shall have another online opportunity to tell our successful stories. Thank you . Priscilla

Henry Nnadozie Ekwuruke • Executive Director and Chief Consultant at Development Generation Africa International from Nigeria

Nigeria is our nation. We want it's prosperity and the UN can help us as we help each other.

If the UN Development System stands ready to assist Nigeria to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and our other national priorities. We thank the UN and urge them to respect and encourage national ownership of the processes "time is greater than space", what does Nigeria need and what is our national capacity, UNDP should help us. Our efforts must be flexible to adapt to Nigeria's contexts, particularly our struggle with insecurity and consumption and production as well as energy poverty!

We need to understand our issues and engage the 'real'people for impact. Involve the civil society,involve women and youths. Everyone's insight will be highly needed like never before! Thank you.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. What do you think are the key areas for making progress on and building national and sub-national capacities for sustainable development in Nigeria?

Henry Nnadozie Ekwuruke • Executive Director and Chief Consultant at Development Generation Africa International from Nigeria

The key area is a strong political will from the President. Cooperation must we our watch-word across all sectors and we must be responsible in managing our people. UN Development System in Nigeria have a vital role to play particularly with helping our legislators to understand the goals. As a participant in the road and the UN Summit for the adoption of the SDGs in September in New York, I listened to my President speak passionately and he walked his talk by making Amina Mohammed our Minister for Environment, she will know what to do! All 36 States must be reached and faster. The civil society have to be empowered to get to work and that is it. Thank you Moderator.

E-discussion Facilitator

Tyank you for your comment. Other participants of our e-discussion have also stressed out the role of parliaments in addressing the SDGs. In that regard, I invite you to check the Week 3 summaries that have been posted.

SOSSOUGA DOSSE Victor • Deputy Project Manager at ONG: Amis des Etrangers au Togo: ADET from Togo

L'implémentation nationale des ODD est simple:Il faut créer un Conseil national des ODD qui doit regrouper les membre du gouvernement, la société civile vraiment engagée dans les ODD, le système des Nations Unies et les autres groupes majeurs. Mais ce conseil ne doit pas être politisé. Ce conseil doit travailler avec les autres partenaires locales(autorités locales, les autorités nationales, les jeunes, les femmes, les personnes handicapées, les personnes âgées, les migrants, les peuples autochtones, les autres minoritées et sur la base des données statistiques. Le conseil national aura pour document de travail les ODD.

E-discussion Facilitator

Merci pour votre commentaire. La création d'un conseil national des OMD pourrait non seulement aider à surmonter les problèmes de coordination mais aussi soutenir la participation des stakeholders dans la mise en œuvre de l'Agenda 2030. Selon votre expérience/opinion, comment le conseil national des ODD soit organisé de manière à maximiser les ressources et maintenir l'intérêt et la participation des différents stakeholders?

Hydroaid • from Italy

Today, more than ever, administrations are called to focus on environmental and climate issues, in spite of critical financial and political conditions. However, the real possibility of approving and eventually implementing policies that concretely address the environmental crisis, fight climate change as well as match development needs, is limited. Local institutions, in particular, tend to be motivated only if economically convenient or under considerable pressure. More frequently, dealing with major environmental problems requires large investments in terms of time and money, although it produces benefits that will be measured for generations to come. Hydroaid – Water for Development Management Institute was founded in 2001 with the mission of contributing to the consolidation of efficient, integrated and sustainable water resources management systems in developing and emerging countries through training and capacity building in areas characterized by severe environmental and climate vulnerabilities. As an Association, it is composed by both public and private members – including local and regional administrations – and this particular structure provides it with precious insights on the processes that link commitments on water cooperation to actions, and actions to results, within public institutions and partners. This point of view and the experience developed on the roadmap to the Millennium Development Goals brought us to formulate 5 directions where public institutions could expand their reach in order to facilitate the implementation of the new Sustainable Development Goals (SDG), with a special focus on SDG 6.1 (By 2030, achieve universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water for all) and 6.b (Support and strengthen the participation of local communities in improving water and sanitation management): 1. Empowering participation opportunities of local groups and entities in the proposal, discussion and formulation of development policies. Participative processes find a productive ground in the work that has been carried out so far by proactive organizations and their networks, which represent both a background and an asset for increased accountability and commitment. Enhanced engagement and sense of responsibility of the entities involved - and of the administrations that must coordinate them - derives from feeling a part of a larger forum and has positive outputs on the improvement of life quality standards through the protection and effective management of threatened natural resources, such as water. 2. Targeting beneficiaries in an effective way to address all local interests and needs, stimulate community participation and sense of project ownership that facilitate the realization of cooperation efforts. Appropriately targeted groups become active members of decision making mechanisms and of the development processes tackling the criticalities of their living environment. Moreover a better management of natural resources inevitably begins from a better management of human resources and their ability to disseminate acquired best practices and know-how. Targeting can be improved through proper monitoring and impact evaluation of activities, particularly by the setup of an inclusive and circular feedback harvesting system where the inputs collected are used to increase the efficiency and stakeholders’ involvement of future initiatives. 3. Improving engagement and communications among exprts and scientists in support of development policies and interventions such as in the case of integrated planning and governance of environmental resources that require interdisciplinary expertise and flexible approaches. The creation of dialogue and sharing platforms should be intended as a tool for supporting capacity development processes in which knowledge is transformed into skills that are, in turn, converted into actions. 4. Promoting jobs for sustainability as a goal of institutions supporting the employment sector and improving the governance of natural resources. This is a loop system that allows public administrations to provide more opportunities to citizens, and an opportunity for administrations themselves to optimize their services and the state of local environment. Both employment and environment are facing a crisis as well as sustainability challenges that could find at least a partial solution in the activation of such a system and its ability to produce benefits in the long term. Effective management of water resources and urban solid waste are examples of areas where investments could be greatly developed and bring even higher advantages, turning a weakness into strength. Considering the rapid evolution of technical and technological solutions in these fields as well as the needs for sound organization, coordination and monitoring, training is a key issue here too. Professional training, in particular, is the tool that paves the way for new jobs where the acquired skills find a concrete application, thus completing the circle. 5. Developing preparedness and disaster management strategies to cope with humanitarian and environmental emergencies. In view of the current events and transformations – such as droughts and conflicts, causing local instability and increasingly frequent migration waves – precautionary planning and prompt action are able to reinforce institutions while protecting natural resources at risk. Policies for promoting leadership approaches inspired to resilience and responsibility are the basis for responding to uncontrolled or unpredicted trends. In addition to this, setting up specialized staff for monitoring, prevention and emergency action is a way to do so, while at the same time creating new opportunities, inclusion and stability at the local level. These are some of the reasons why Hydroaid strives to support development processes with managers and technicians as beneficiaries. Among our training participants were operators of municipalities, utilities and public administrations – ideal target groups to maximize the impacts of the transferred knowledge and know-how – committed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of their institutions and communities. Policies for sustainability can drive institutions towards better management of resources and communities; similarly, individuals and groups orient their behaviors according to a shared vision that can be inspired by them. Solid administrations with the support and engagement of local communities, public/private partnerships and stakeholders are more likely to withstand shocks and pressures caused by human or environmental stress while contributing to the achievement of the SDGs.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. You have described guidelines developed by Hydroaid for public institutions to expand their reach in order to facilitate the implementation of the SDGs. In your experience, do you believe they can also be used to help mainstream the 2030 Agenda into national development policies?

BNEIJARA (not verified)

Bonjour

 Les messages clés qui ressortent de toutes les contributions dans cette phase de concertation en ligne pour  la mise en œuvre des ODD sont les suivants : La mise en œuvre des ODD est un exercice politique qui exige un leadership de haut niveau (NU)aussi bien dans les organisations régionales  qu’au sein des gouvernements des pays, afin d’optimiser l’impact des interventions et leur conformité avec les principales priorités nationales selon une approche collective convenue qui puisse répondre aux spécificités des pays. Il est nécessaire d’être sensible aux priorités essentielles afin d’obtenir des résultats visibles et renforcer la confiance entre les différents acteurs. La bonne coordination  peut aider à sceller des engagements communs à ces priorités essentielles, mais cela  ne peut être efficace que si  les interventions sont assemblées. Pour réaliser de réels progrès sur le terrain. Les efforts visant à mettre en œuvre les ODD doivent passer d’un dialogue global à une action au niveau national. Cela suppose d’établir des objectifs clairs, l’élaboration de feuilles de route convenues pour la mise en œuvre, le suivi et l'évaluation conjointe  (examen) des risques et le suivi des progrès.

 

Les objectifs de consolidation doivent être mis en avant et à ce moment précis de de l’engagement mondial sur les ODD par la réalisation commune de la planification, du suivi, et donc d’une reddition de comptes mutuelle.

La mise en œuvre des ODD exige de mettre davantage l'accent sur un ensemble plus restreint de priorités, sur une compréhension commune des facteurs de faiblesse et de sources de résilience. La transparence de l'aide est une condition minimale pour forger des partenariats plus solides. La mise à jour des systèmes de gestion et d’information de l'aide publique au développement, doit obligatoirement être  intégrée dans les processus de planification et de budgétisation nationale et accompagnés d’efforts pour améliorer la gestion des finances publiques, la participation active des gouvernements,  des organisations de la société civile, des partenaires au développement NU devrait être une étape essentielle pour la propriété de l'Agenda 2030, sa mise en œuvre et ses résultats. Le développement des pays relève en premier lieu des gouvernements. Sans appropriation des ODD à la fois des gouvernements et de leur population les résultats ne seront jamais obtenus. Ces ODD ne pourront être atteints que par l’adoption de nouvelles stratégies et priorités politiques nationales. Confectionnés par la communauté internationale, ils doivent être assimilés par les gouvernements locaux oui ils ont signé et approuvé mais cela n’est pas suffisant une campagne de sensibilisation mondiale est nécessaire. La responsabilité première pour réaliser ces objectifs et les cibles revienne aux gouvernements des pays, tous les acteurs de la vie nationale doivent être impliqués. A travers les associations communautaires et professionnelles, les groupes de femmes et les organisations non gouvernementales, c’est la société civile dans son ensemble qui doit participer aux différentes étapes de la réalisation des ODD. 

E-discussion Facilitator

Merci pour votre commentaire. Vous avez mentionné certains intervenants qui ont besoin d'être impliqués dans la mise en œuvre des ODD (associations professionnelles, groupes de femmes ..). Que pensez-vous devrait être fait pour engager les parties prenantes dans le partage d'informations et d'expériences? Pouvez-vous nous donner des exemples concrets?

E-discussion Facilitator

2016 ECOSOC e-discussion; Thematic Window II, “National Implementation”

Week 3 (March 14-March 21)- Summary

 Thanks to all participants in this e-discussion for your continued engagement and meaningful contributions; as we near the final week lets continue this encouraging trend and push forward! To recap, please see below a summary of the key points made during Week 3:

1) How can the SDGs be effectively mainstreamed into relevant national sustainable development policies and programmes, while preserving countries' policy space to pursue national priorities? How can the UN development system best support this?

  • Participation of sub-national governments in the national development planning efforts can lead not only to awareness on the 2030 Agenda but also in the mainstreaming of the SDGs into national policies. In Zimbabwe, the adoption of a “bottom-up” (from sub-national to national government) planning approach led to the identification of bottlenecks that prevent policy interventions being effectively implemented, which resulted in provincial level accelerated action plans that were the basis for a national level “Acceleration Action Plan for SDG”. In Ethiopia, the country set an ambitious strategy on the localization of the MDGs as well as in setting an MDG fund that was used to support health, education, water and sanitation across the regions.
  • Countries should promote national discussions on their development policies in the light of the 2030 Agenda. Efforts should be taken in order to guarantee broad participation of stakeholders in all aspects of the policy planning process, including program/project review and monitoring.
  • Participants also highlighted the need to involve parliaments in the discussion of the 2030 Agenda - the UN could have specific actions for that public and perhaps even appoint a representative to work together in the parliament of each country.
  • Once parliamentarians are key policy and decision makers at national level, their engagement could provide countries with the necessary resources to include the SDGs in national development strategies and to facilitate the implementation process. As parliamentarians are elected as representatives of the population, their engagement should be based on society mobilization strategies and platforms so as to achieve organized community support (through petitions and campaigns, for example) for the renewal and coherence of legal frameworks.
  • Participants also emphasize the role of leadership in both mainstreaming the SDGs into national policy and in promoting its implementation at the national and sub-national level. In that regards, participants have suggested:

○      Strong leadership must be developed not only at the national and sub national level but also within the UN and within the private sector and civil society, including academia.

■        The role of civil society groups, especially those engage women and youth, was noted by participants as key in advancing the implementation agenda and in monitoring its progress through participatory monitoring.

○      Countries should set up coordination entities at the highest level of the government structure. Suggestions ranged from creating National Ministries responsible for the implementation of the SDGs to tasking central agencies or bodies, such as the office of the President, with implementation of the SDGs;

○      Mainstreaming and integrating SDGs into national development plans at the sub-national level should incorporate prioritization and sequencing, to ensure the vertical and horizontal coherence of policy frameworks.

○      Governments should appoint a body or person to lead the negotiations and manage the relationship with the UN;

○      Using legal and technical systems to channel diplomatic, security, political, institutional and business resolutions in regards to the SDGs.

○      Dissemination of the “Torchbearers of #SDGs" which, in Nigeria, aims to reach university Vice Chancellors to make them Champions of the Goals and the country’s own Agenda 2063;

○      Countries should have their HPLF country representative to work internally as focal point and main supporter of the implementation of the 2030 Agenda at the country level.

  • The adoption of the 2030 Agenda within countries could certainly profit from the lessons learned and best practices from the implementation of the MDGs, as well as save time and resources. That was the case of Ethiopia, which with the support of DESA and UNDP, was able to embark on the mainstreaming of the SDGs during the preparation of the current medium term strategy (2015/16-2019/20).
  • Participants of the e-discussion propose that the UN should further countries to analyze national agendas against the SDGs, considering commonalities and differences among countries.
  • The UN to support implementation by further supporting regional partners in the development of regional partnerships and action plans;
  • The UN country offices could play a pivotal role in initiating joint priority setting sessions, providing technical support to the process and inviting stakeholders to step in as solution providers. Participants stress that the priority setting process must be anchored in goals and indicators that are evidence based rather than just being a broad based consultative process. 
  • Promoting worldwide discussions such as the e-discussion on the 2016 ECOSOC theme can support the UN in its role as catalyst of the 2030 Agenda once all the good ideas and pertinent suggestions gathered from participants will be shared with policy maker.
  • Participants argued for the UN to provide technical support by commissioning core research studies in response to identified issues so as to strengthen informed policy development processes and promote in-depth problem analysis.
  • In providing technical support to countries on the 2030 Agenda, the UN should take on a challenging approach and a facilitator role, pursue a strong agenda on awareness and policy advocacy, as well as follow a mutual accountable process while urging stakeholders to respect and encourage national ownership.
  • The UN should also play an active role in monitoring and evaluating the implementation of the 2030 Agenda, including the use of ICTs to analyze and monitor data from all over the world and provide transparency on the progress of the 2030 Agenda.

○      Participants also mentioned that data platforms used for monitoring and evaluating at the global level should be tailored with local environments in mind and should incorporate multiple facets, such as the economic, political, social, and cultural.

○      Participants also mentioned the UN should support and promote community level monitoring structures and systems that ultimately feed into regional, national and global monitoring systems. UN’s support of such systems would increase trust in the data.

  • Participants stressed the need for international discussions on the 2030 Agenda to focus on the “how ” questions, like how to design and deliver solutions to real and complex problems on the ground within, noting that the 2030 Agenda defined “what” in respect to partnerships and share common interests and goals. In that regard, participants suggest that:

○      The UN and other international bodies should review main documents and reports on the 2030 Agenda in order for them to focus on “how” questions to answer how to design and deliver solutions.

○      The international community should foster the conversion of each “vision documents” into strategies, policies and programs/projects from the community to global levels. Interventions should be based on common frameworks adapted to suit the needs of each context/location while activities must be driven by known approaches with clear principles, instruments corresponding to each principle, practices and database with detailed work program with clear responsibilities;

○      Stakeholders engaged in the country’s development policies should establish roadmaps under a participatory and inclusive approach so as to elaborate a strategy to monitor and evaluate the implementation of the SDGs.

  • Participants identified various challenges to implementation as:

○      Promoting a common understanding of the larger 2030 Agenda objective and of different stakeholders’ roles at all levels;

○      Lack of practice of political education in families and in the educational system;

○      Societal fragmentation, which results in public incoherence and unresponsiveness to current social and environmental concerns;

○      The prevalence of the economic dimension in development, which makes citizens act mainly as consumers and professionals (workers), but not as citizens participating in local, regional and national political institutions;

○      The existence of multiple uncoordinated administrative and governmental levels, such as federal governments, makes it expensive and difficult to increase social participation in public planning and budgeting mechanisms due to lack of budget, human resources, ICT resources or political will;

○      The presence of sporadic cycles of engagements during conferences, which turn into priorities for policies, but do not end up being coherently integrated into public planning processes;

○      National priorities, which take over the debate and marginalize issues of SDG implementation, such as Brazil, where public debt financing takes priority over tax reform to reduce unfairness in taxation;

○      The non-binding / voluntary approach of the global sustainable development / environmental agendas while the trade, investment and financial global agreements (such as the Transpacific Partnership) have a binding approach;

○      Inequality, the existence of vulnerable and marginalized groups makes empowerment and community participation difficult and prone to manipulation;

 

2) What are key areas for making progress on and building national and sub-national capacities for sustainable development, and how do they differ across country contexts (e.g. least developed countries, middle income countries, high-income countries, countries in situations of fragility etc.)? When and how can partnerships effectively contribute to capacity building and sustainable development?

  • Participants highlight that countries need to improve coordination within national governments and between national and sub-national governments in order to mainstream and implement the SDGs. Countries should therefore improve synchronization in the planning processes at the national and sub-national levels.
  • Participants also agree that fighting corruption is still a pivotal area for improvement if countries wish to successfully implement development agendas. In order for progress to be achieved in this area, participants suggest the following:

○      Civil society organizations must be provided an active role in fighting corruption internally and globally;

○      Community monitoring mechanisms should be created and strengthened while accountability systems must be established at every level. In India, for example, community monitoring systems like the social audit have now been institutionalized as part of programme design;

○      Governments should implement transparency systems that allow mapping out of government expenditures at all levels;

○      The UN should consider creating a body to monitor and punish corruption. Participants suggested that this body have an international mandate, passing an international bill for corruption, setting international standards to measure global impacts, code of conduct, international accountability measures and a ‘check and balance’ system for governments, public sectors, private sectors and the UN. This initiative envisioned must be approved by the UN General Assembly, with international organizations and NGOs role enhanced beyond the conventional consultation process;

  • As policy makers and planners at national and local level are responsible for integrating the SDGs in a country’s development planning, capacity building should focus on allowing them to integrate all relevant aspects for better operationalization of SDGs, namely: ownership of objectives, 2030 Agenda and related agreements, sustainability management tools and techniques and methods for aligning SDGs to national and sectoral policies.
  • In fragile states, governments still implement strategies and policies suggested by international agencies and partners without proper ownership. The UN should provide capacity building for state officials so they can properly analyze and adapt strategies that are offered by stakeholders. Also, in those countries the 2030 Agenda have not yet been properly advertised and understood both among government ranks and within civil society.

 

3) What steps are necessary to ensure that all stakeholders, including the government, private sector and civil society can readily exchange information and experiences? How can "peer exchange" be established and nurtured?

  • Participants stress the need for governments to provide proper funding to sustainable development cooperation initiatives, which, in turn, should adopt an integrated territorial, multi-actor and multi-level approach to partnerships.
  • As in the previous weeks, participants highlighted the role the ICTs play in disseminating knowledge and engaging stakeholders. Yet, this week participants called attention to the need of providing stakeholders with access to both ICTs, through wider public access to broadband internet, and training on how to reach and understand the data on public policies. It was mentioned that in Brazil, for instance, web-based tools are effective agenda setting and knowledge sharing tools between participants. Wider public access to internet is seen as key for capacity building and effective participative monitoring and accountability In that regard, participants suggested that, in countries where higher education is funded by the government, universities could be prompted to act as catalysts for capacity building and knowledge sharing.
  • Participants suggested that the UN development system could support countries to foster the involvement of stakeholders, especially people from the grassroots organizations.
  • The UN System could improve its role in providing training and capacity building for all stakeholders by using ICTs to offer MOOCS and WEBINARS. One good example of such strategies in the Brazil Learning Initiative for a World without Poverty (WWP), a partnership between the Brazilian Government and UN bodies that aims to identify, document and disseminate the Brazil's experience with the design and implementation of policies and programs to promote social development and poverty reduction.
  • To achieve peer exchange and stakeholders involvement, the challenge is to promote a common understanding of the larger objective and the roles for different stakeholders at all levels: the need for individual and collective ownership.
  • As means to further wider stakeholder engagement, participants also propose that conversations on the 2030 Agenda could be fostered:

○      In youths/students activities (e.g., in extra-curricular activities including debating clubs, drama clubs, singing choirs, essay and poster competitions, etc.)

○      In local and national policy makers organizations

○      In religious institutions, as they command a huge population

○      In local/national celebrations/festivals;

○      In the private sector through their corporate social responsibility departments

○      By the involvement/engagement of artists (fine and performing arts);

○      And by providing enhanced impetus for the role of mass media and social media in fostering development activities (locally, nationally and regionally). In Kenya, for instance, there are radio programs focused on development, which discuss particular topic, and allow discussion with the listeners through facilitation of the programs by experts, this too would enable wider engagement.

  • The UN should also further the direct participation of local organizations in the monitoring and evaluation of the SDGs progress within the UN development system, with government awareness.

 

Henry Nnadozie Ekwuruke • Executive Director and Chief Consultant at Development Generation Africa International from Nigeria

Thank you. We are already scaling up the Building Bridges Initiative with Local Voices in Nigeria, through this initiatives we aim to build young people capacity for sustainable development in Nigeria and give them voice and tools for impact. The night clubs and poitical parties would not be left behind, we also want the blind, and dumb to know and be involved. We are all connected and everyone is needed!

Lanre Rotimi (not verified)

Dear Team

Dear e-Discussion Facilitator from Brazil,

We welcome and strongly commend Week 3 Summary.

As promised, please find attached two more Focused Points Papers. We have in these two Papers which should be read together, provided additional clarification and information on the MASTER KEYS of How To(s) and Know How(s) at minimum certain levels required from Village to Global Stakeholders, if National Goals aligned and harmonized to Global Goals Vision Ambitions are to be achieved by 2030 Target date.

You said UNDP and UNDESA Report on e-Discussion 2016 Outcome will be presented to ECOSOC. Can you please tell participants, if this presentation will be at a specific ECOSOC Event or as soon as the Official Copy of the Report is ready? If at a specific ECOSOC Event which One?

This e-Discussion has Three Themes, at the time of this Post Follow Up and Review had 28 Comments; National Implementation has 187 Comments and 2030 Agenda: Scope and Implications had 120 Comments. It is ONLY in National Implementation Theme that the e-Discussion Facilitators are ACTIVE and its Facilitator from Brazil particularly Skilled in drafting appropriate follow up How questions. Is there a Link between the higher interaction in National Implementation Theme and its higher Comments Volume?

Records show that only NEHAP/ISPE/EAG set out answers to How questions and that answers intended for How questions were in reality answers to What questions and that What questions have been over-answered. It is clear that there are many Cross Cutting Issues in the Three Themes. Is there a Link between Lack of Competences to answer How questions and lower Comments Volume in Follow Up and Review Theme?

Week 3 Summary makes many important points relating to Central Role of Parliamentarians. However, the Summary has not saddled Parliamentarians with New Duties and Responsibilities beyond their Statutory Duties and responsibilities in any Civilised Society. The Big Question is given the Poor Score Card of many Parliaments on both Developed and Developing Countries sides, Can our Parliamentarians Deliver on the Duties and Responsibilities without clear answers to How To(s) and Know How set out in NEHAP/ISPE/EAG Submissions?

For Best Results, we once more suggest a Draft Report is Posted for Comments. If there are material amendments, there may be need for 2nd or 3rd Draft before a Final Draft Report agreeable to the greater majority or all contributors could be produced. We suggest further that this Final Draft Report is released in 6 UN Official Languages.

Best wishes

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for you contribution. On key areas for making progress on and building national and sub-national capacities for sustainable development, several of the participants of our e-discussion have highlighted the need to ensure education and training that are inclusive and build capacity to promote change in accordance to sustainable development principles.  In your paper “ISPE - EAG - Focused Points for ECOSOC e Discussion 2016 - Part 2”, you stressed out the need for "reinvigorating Education for Sustainable Development": "The key lies in building capacity and enacting 'transformative change' at local, national, regional and global levels, guided by the UN SDGs, indicators and corresponding criteria (2016- 2030)".

In order for other participants to profit from your contribution on the issue, I highlight the following expert of your paper:

"The additional Challenges are those of Education, Capacity Building, Pro Poor Institutional Reform, Pro Poor Economic Growth and related matters all structured within:-

  1. Inclusive EAT4SD: Education and Training for Sustainable Development – 5 Linkages: EAT4SD Theoretical and Practical Instruction; EAT4SD and Industry; EAT4SD at Different Levels – Primary, Secondary, Tertiary, Vocational, Professional; EAT4SD at different Types of Institutions – Government, Private, NGO, Parochial, other’ EAT4SD and Extension – Government, Private, Pluralistic.

  2. Inclusive CAB4SD: Capacity Building for Sustainable Development – 3 Levels: Individual – Hard Competences: Learning and Skills and Soft Competences: Character, Courage and Mindset; Institution – Pro Poor Institution Reform Processes and Pro Poor Economic Growth Processes that Support Individuals practicing their Hard and Soft Competences in their Day to Day work and in ways that help achieve Corporate Goals and Vision and Society – Political & Cultural, Economic & Financial, Social & Environmental, Religious & Moral, Peace & Security Space for Institutions to Thrive on Chaos.

  3. 3PI and 3PI Multidisciplinary Training, Research and Consultancy as One: Policy, Program, Project Intervention, 3PI and 3PI Training as One in each Action Agenda Item in AAAA, SDG, COP21 Outcome, Agenda 21 Aligned and Harmonized to National development Plans in 306/193 UN Member States, UN System including WBG and IMF and MGoS Member CSOs/NGOs and Non MGoS Member CSOs/NGOs in Developed and Developing Countries sides.

  4. Integrated Master Plans: Village to Global

  5. Internal and External Consultants Support System: Village to Global

  6. Correct Diagnosis, Prescription, Surgery and Recovery Management System: Village to Global

  7. One Worldwide Approach to (a) – (f) and earlier part of (1)."

 

Regarding the question "How can leadership and 'champions' be fostered within the Agenda 2030 stakeholders so as to allow for the SDGs to be mainstreamed into national policies?", it is interesting for other participants in this discussion to point out that your answer was:

"The Governing Council and Executive Management must demonstrate and be seen to demonstrate the following Approaches:

-1.  Servant Leadership

2. Walk Your Talk

3. Lamb and Lion

4. Bottom Up

5. Top Down

6. Change for Best

7. Carrot and Stick

8. Law and Order

9. Sanction and Enforcement and

10.  One Worldwide Approach. "

 

Finally, on finding correct ansers to How questions, you highlighted that "the following conditions must be met:

  1. Conversion of each Vision Document into Strategy, into Policies, into Programs, into Projects at Community/Village to Global levels.

  2. Interventions in (1) will have Common Frameworks, Processes, Systems, Structures, Formats adapted to suit the unique and specific needs of each Context / Location.

  3. Activities in (2) will the Driven by Known Approach with Clear Principles, Instruments corresponding to each Principle, Practices and Database and there will be Clear Statement on:-

  a) Calendar of Events

  b) Who Does What

  c) Who Pays for What

  d) Where each Stakeholder is Now (A)

  e) Where each Stakeholder needs to be when Vision is achieved

on Target Date (B)

  f) How to Move from (A) to (B)".

Lanre Rotimi (not verified)

Dear e-Discussion Facilitator from Brazil, 

Thank you for welcoming our contributions. We are particularly glad that you quoted copiously from Part 2 to draw participants attention to salient points. The Ball is in the Court of the UN System – UNO, WBG and IMF Entities to Lead the Way in the work towards operationalizing in practice these good ideas and pertinent suggestions.

Best wishes.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your constributions. I invite you to check Jessie Lydia Henshaw post on the cross-sectoral partnership questions you addressed on your "ISPE - EAG - Focused Points for ECOSOC e Discussion 2016 - Part 2":

Jessie Lydia Henshaw Natural systems scientist, CIVICUS member from United Statesyesterday at 05.56 pm

My thoughts are in the answer to these four questions:    My consulting credentials are in the attached resume'.

1.       What does it take to galvanize new cross-sectoral partnerships?

Jessie Henshaw: Partnerships are like families, everyone having the same and separate agendas, the cohesion from an ability to work as a whole, making decisions for the whole, different parties making differing independent contributions.  This same principle of “whole system design” applies to the world societies and cultures the SDG’s are designed to serve.  In the nature of whole systems, it becomes whole system development that moves the real welfare of any part.   So for the SDG’s, the goal of all partners should be to contribute to the development of the whole, leaving no constituency out, in each one’s different way.   

Case A: For example, UN monitored and regulated partnerships are needed to assure the system as a whole remains faithful to the UN mandate, and that the distribution of support makes the most use of it.   Just as in a family, those “top-down” partnerships need inspire and serve the “bottom-up” partnerships that will had more direct local understanding of the needs and abilities of societies as they seek to pull themselves together to grow and prosper as a whole.  

Case B: The nature of whole family or culture growth and development is a matter of discovery and sharing, from new points of view, often arising from seemingly ‘alien’ sources.  So everyone become a “knowledge worker” in that sense, alert to possible meanings of unfamiliar change and potential, much more of a “search process” than a “power play”.   So using what is called “big data” to locate interesting or surprising patterns, social, technological, institutional, like emerging trends of either “things working” or “things failing”, and having vital conversations everywhere, is needed to feed the genius of the cultures and letting it flow to where it’s needed.   It might very well be facilitated by a “knowledge extension service” in every region (i.e. mobile librarian perhaps, connecting local groups with knowledge resources) or other kinds of innovations, to make better use of the human creativity available from near and far.

 

2.       How can the UN system strengthen coherence and coordination of UN-led multi-stakeholder partnerships? What are the additional challenges involved in ensuring the transparency and accountability of cross-sectoral multi-stakeholder partnerships, and how can these be addressed?

Jessie Henshaw:  The “whole system” approach expands the “nexus” idea to the limit, seeing “development” not as a list of projects at all, but as a way of supporting the growth of human cultures by self-determination, inspired and aided by the UN vision and programs, but to achieve their own ends, the securing of their homes and fulfillment of their own way of life.   This new way of interpreting the SDG’s, as for inspiring and enabling the cultural growth, development and security of human societies, in effect conceptually turns “inside out” the statement of the UN SDG plan, which had been described as being for promoting targeted interventions in struggling societies, to push and prod them to achieve certain “targets”.     

 It makes each culture’s own growth in seeking its own way of life, the “nexus” of every single one of the SDG goals and targets.

The real “nexus” of any successful economic or social development is always the success of the developing culture’s ambitions itself, making the role of all the goals, targets, outside governments and organizations secondary.  Their principal job in fostering the SDG’s would be to condone, respect and give heartfelt support to each society’s own culture’s self-fulfillment.

The most natural way to do that is to recognize the natural “nexus” of each developing culture as a whole.   “The real “nexus” of any successful economic or social development is always the success of the developing culture’s ambitions itself, making the role of all the goals, targets, outside governments and organizations secondary.  Their principal job in fostering the SDG’s would be to condone, respect and give heartfelt support to each society’s own culture’s self-fulfillment.

3.       How can multi-stakeholder partnerships involving the United Nations be more transparent and accountable?

Jessie Henshaw: Learning to act in a way that is transparent to other actors, and to the cultures within which one is acting, is a rather tall order.   So far all the expert measurement groups in the sciences and at the UN that I’ve tried to work with, actually seem to have rebelled against starting to be transparent regarding the actual scale of cultural and ecological impacts we are responsible for as a result of using money.   It’s a highly solvable accounting problem, based on how we keep track of money and use it so widely to organize so much of society.   So given that, a very simple principle of accounting for “average” cases can be also adjusted for “exceptions”.

“Average shares of benefits of a whole system for producing them has average shares of responsibility for the costs.”   

No one wants to do it though, as it would mean “internalizing all externalities” of the economy in a very visible way.

In effect it would sweep out all “the elephants from under the carpet” we’ve been storing up, hiding all the side effects of altering the earth in ever bigger ways ever faster... as if saved for some  future day.  The scientific purpose would be to just have an honest accounting of what we are choosing to do with our financial decisions.  I think we’d quickly find that with a holistic view of what clearly measurable costs to our future our spending is accumulating today…  we would realize every dollar is making lasting changes to the earth.  We’d be still glad to have them, but would become cautions and in a stepwise fashion begin to think much more carefully what we do with them.

There are other kinds of transparency too.   It’s hard for different organizations to be transparent with each other, as they all think differently, for one thing.   Most of the time the standard of “truth” people use is what I call the “economic standard”, presenting things in the most profitable way to the presenter.  There is another kind, the  “trust standard”.   The trust standard is to be “not-misleading”, as an offer to correct or clarify if what was said turns out to be misinterpreted.   It’s oddly the standard practice in designing computers, that any message sent is checked to see if it was received, to not be misleading.    If organizations agreed to the “trust standard” they’d quickly learn they could challenge anyone who, as is common practice today, effectively “telling the biggest fib they can get away with”, using the “economic standard” of the truth.   

4.       How can the UN improve its due diligence, monitoring and review of its partnerships that contribute to the implementation of the 2030 Agenda?

 

Jessie Henshaw: If the objective is not to serve the UN, per se, but to serve the growth and development of each culture being inspired and enabled to seek its own purposes, it would seem to greatly complicate the monitoring.  It could be seen as very usefully dividing the job in two.   There’s 1) the communicating to and getting feedback from the culture being served, then 2) the internal accounting of agencies for how well they themselves think they used their resources.   That may indeed greatly simplify the task in the end.

Lanre Rotimi (not verified)

Thanks. Jessie's points simply underline points we consistently make. The 306/193 Member States as well as the UN System including WBG and IMF have Central Role to Play. Yes, they need External Technical Support but either or both Categories of Stakeholders have to MOVE FIRST before Stakeholders in the 3rd Category - MGoS Member CSOs/NGOs' and Non MGoS Member CSOs'/NGOs can Move in the work towards achieving incfreasing convergence between National Goals aligne dnad harmonized with Global Goals Vision Intention and Reality and by 2030 Target Date.

Best wishes.

Lanre Rotimi (not verified)

Dear e-Discussion Facilitator from Brazil,

Further to points made in yesterday's Post,  as the Facilitators on the Three Themes are expected to send UNDP and UNDESA Report on e-Discussion 2016 Outcome to ECOSOC that are expected to focus on action-oriented recommendations for steps and measures to close remaining gaps, meet challenges and accelerate implementation, to be taken by Governments, relevant intergovernmental bodies, mechanisms and entities of the United Nations system and other stakeholders" we wish to make the following recommendations:

  1. Promote immediate selection of One Worldwide Approach, Whole of the UN System including WBG and IMF Approach
  2. Promote immediate Shift from silos to synergy and fragmentation to Multi Stakeholder Partnership, MSP
  3. Promote Innovative Use of Science and Technology
  4. Promote Innovative Use of Monitoring and Evaluation for Result
  5. Promote Innovative Use of Finance for Development Result
  6. Promote Change and Modernization in the UN System including WBG and IMF to become Fit for the 21st Century and to become more cost effective and deliver better.
  7. Promote Attitudinal, Behavioural and Cultural Change within the UN System including WBG and IMF
  8. Immediately address the current lack of clarity with regard to an overall point of integration to synthesize and oversee the implementation effort in its entirety.
  9. Immediately address all How To(s) and Know How(s) within (1) – (8)

To DO this Stakeholders need more detailed information that we have set out in UNDP and UNDESA e-Discussion 2016 Focused Points Paper Series, Papers 1 - 4.Papers 1 - 3 have been Posted.Paper 4 attached herewith, has been produced from UN Chief Executives Board fro Coordination, CEB November 2015 Summary of Conclusions.We await your response to specific questions asked we yesterday's Post.Best wishes,Lanre RotimiDirector GeneralInternational Society for Poverty Elimination /Economic Alliance Group andDirector NEHAP (New End Hunger and Poverty)

Lanre Rotimi (not verified)

Dear e-Discussion Facilitator from Brazil,

Thank you for welcoming our contributions. We have read the UNDESA article. It’s simply a type of Summary of the Discussions and invitation to those who may not be aware to join the Discussion and contribute their own quota, if they have the competences to do so. This Invitation does not apply to us as we are already contributing.

On additional comments, we have done this in Part 4 and Part 5. Just as you responded to Part 2 and Part 3, we await your response to Part 4 and Part 5 and even the earlier Part 1.

We urge you and other Stakeholders to please recognize that all good ideas and pertinent suggestions made in Part 1 – Part 5 are Cross Cutting and so Part 1 – Part 5 should be taken as One.

Best wishes.

Lanre Rotimi (not verified)

Dear e-Discussion Facilitator from Brazil,

Further to points made in yesterday's Post,  as the Facilitators on the Three Themes are expected to send UNDP and UNDESA Report on e-Discussion 2016 Outcome to ECOSOC that are expected to focus on action-oriented recommendations for steps and measures to close remaining gaps, meet challenges and accelerate implementation, to be taken by Governments, relevant intergovernmental bodies, mechanisms and entities of the United Nations system and other stakeholders" please find attached Focused Points Paper 5.

We urge Stakeholders to please recognize that the detailed information that we have set out in UNDP and UNDESA e-Discussion 2016 Focused Points Paper Series, Papers 1 - 5 need to be taken together for Best Results.Best wishes,Lanre RotimiDirector GeneralInternational Society for Poverty Elimination /Economic Alliance Group andDirector NEHAP (New End Hunger and Poverty)

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your contribution. In your paper "ISPE - EAG - Focused Points for ECOSOC e Discussion 2016 - Part 3", you mention 3PCM (integrated approach to Project/Program/Policy Cycle Management) as "probably the most advance such One Worldwide Approach in the World today". Could you share examples on successful application of the 3PCM approach in your country? In your opinion, what are the main obstacles to achieving such a unified approach worldwide?

Lanre Rotimi (not verified)

Dear e-Discussion Facilitator from Brazil,

Thank you for welcoming our comments. The Co Creators of 3PCM in 2009 are Dr Hellmut Eggers (German) and Mr. Lanre Rotimi (Nigerian). 3PCM is Merger of Mr Rotimi's 3PCM and CSR (focused on entire Development Cooperation Process) created in 1993 and Dr. Eggers PCM (focused only on Evaluation) created in 1987. PCM is the Most Widely used Evaluation Approach in our World today. But it is doubtful if many Professionals using PCM know that it was created by Dr. Eggers. However, it is clear that the PCM they are using is not Original PCM but some adultration of it because NONE of them know the 3 Principles, 3 Instruments corresponding to each Principles and 3 Practices of PCM. We CHALLENGE anyone anywhere in our World today that claim to be using Original PCM to tell us what these 3 Principles, 3 Instruments corresponding to each Principle and 3 Practices of PCM are.

3PCM has 4 Principles, 4 Instruments corresponding to each Principle, 4 Practices and a Database. 3PCM is sufficiently Robust - All Inclusive, All Embracing and Ambitious to serve as the "One Worldwide Approach" called for in the SG Synthesis Report 2014, in the UN CEB Summary of Conclusions November 2015 and similar UN System Entities Documents. What Gets Measured Gets Dome and What Gets Licensed Gets Regulated. Should National Leaders and World Leaders adopt 3PCM as "One Worldwide Approach" many of the Challenges of National and International Development Cooperation they are grappling with from Village to Global levels will simply fizzle out and the remaining will be much easier to tackle.

3PCM has been tried and tested extensively in Nigeria, the Biggest Test being in the Nigeria Postal Service, NIPOST between 2000 – 2001, the Golden Age of NIPOST where letters were delivered anywhere in Nigeria within 72 hours. NIPOST at the time was One of the Bigges Public Services in Nigeria with over 45,000 Staff. many of whom passed through our Re-orientaton Program that was a Key Component of the NIPOST Productivity and Qualitty Improvement Program or NIPOST Re-engineering Program.

3PCM is based on “Living Strategy” so it continues to improve over the yearsfrom 1993 to date.

“In your opinion, what are the main obstacles to achieving such a unified approach worldwide?” The Main Obstacles are two sides of the same Coin - Putting Special Interest before National Interest at the National Level and Special Interest before Global Interest at the Global Level AND Unwillingness to Muster required Political Will on the part of relevant Policy Makers and Decision Makers at National / Global Level.

It was the Willingness of the then Post Master General, PMG, now late, to Lead NIPOST Executive Management to Muster required Political Will that created the necessary Political, Economic, Financial, Social and Cultural Space to achieve the AMAZING Transformation in Record Time that the Re-engineering Program achieved in NIPOST.

It was putting Special Interest over National Interest by the then PMG that led to putting the NIPOST Re-engineering Program on Technical Suspension in 2001. The Technical Suspension was not lifted until he died in 2005. After he died the ag PMG and substantive PMG that took over from him did not lift the Technical Suspension again because they put Special Interest over National Interest.

Sometimes in 2002 or thereabouts the Dutch Postal Administration was engaged as NIPOST Technical Adviser. They did not achieve anything near what we achieved before the contract was ended or terminated. NIPOST has been sliding over the years from 2001 to date. Delivery Trucks bought in 2000 under our Re-engineering Program, now rickety are still in NIPOST use today. Can you imagine what could have happened if the Re-engineering Program was not truncated by the Technical Suspension? The Technical Suspension was our reward for helping the Late PMG get Confirmation of his Appointment in record time through exceptional success achieved by the Re-engineering Program.

You said UNDP and UNDESA Report on e-Discussion 2016 Outcome will be presented to ECOSOC. It will be recalled that we asked in earlier Post that you please tell participants, if this presentation will be at a specific ECOSOC Event or as soon as the Official Copy of the Report is ready? If at a specific ECOSOC Event which One?

The UNDESA Article appears to shed some light. It now appears that the Report that will be submitted to ECOSOC will no longer be one prepared by UNDP and UNDESA but an SG Report. We perceive that this is an Upgrade to give weight to the quality of good ideas and pertinent suggestions harvested from this Global Consultation.

It will be recalled that 2014 IEAG on Data Revolution produced a Draft Report that was commented upon before a Final Copy SG Report on Data Revolution – a much more improved Document was released by the SG in November 2014 but not in the 6 UN Official Languages; that  4 December 2014 Synthesis Report First and Final Draft was produced in 6 UN Official Languages on 31 December 2014 without first taking comments on the Draft. Our suggestion that comments be taken to improve the Final Copy even if release in 6 UN Official Languages had to wait till 15 January 2015 was ignored.  Regretfully Member States IGNORED this SG Synthesis Report. Could the outcome have been different had our suggestion that comments be taken beofre release of Final Copy been accepted?

To avoid these past mistakes, now that this Global Consultation is to produce an SG Report, we once more suggest that a Draft Report be circulated for comments before a Final Copy in 6 UN Official languages is submitted to ECOSOC.

It will be recalled that in this Paper Series we have called for Simultaneous Review of SG Report on Data Revolution and SG Synthesis Report alongside ongoing Review of SG Report on Follow Up and Review and that all these Reviews should focus on finding correct answers to How To(s) and Know How(s). It is our hope thst this suggestion will be accepted.

Best wishes.

Lanre Rotimi (not verified)

Dear e-Discussion Facilitator from Brazil, 

As this Global Consultation accelerates to a close in the next few hours, we wish to share some closing remarks:

  1. You have been a Great Pilot. You demonstrated Competences in analysing comments and coming up with appropriate follow up How questions has undoubtedly enriched Interaction between Facilitators and Participants on this Theme. This is very commendable. There is a need to Profile these Competences and ensure that all Facilitators in Physical and Virtual Interactive Meetings on Activities within Global Goals - AAAA, SDG, COP21, Agenda 21 organised by any UN System including WBG and IMF Entity meet minimum certain levels of the Profiled Competences and that you are meaningfully involved in Training Facilitators to acquire these Competences.
  2. We are concerned that the Global Consultation Component of a High Level Thematic Debate on Achieving SD being convened by PGA on 21 April 2016 is Duplication of this UNDESA and UNDP e-Discussion Global Consultation. This is Diversion and Distraction that is Avoidable Drawback in the work towards achieving Global Goals Vision Ambitions by 2030 Target date. All Motion without Movement and taking 1 Step Forward and 3 Steps Backward that occurred in the Past must Stop in the New Dispensation. Otherwise this Global Consultation is either Farcade or Deception.
  3. If this Global Consultation is to be Motion with Movement, it Must Produce SG Report that is Vision and Words with ACTION and the IMPLEMENTATION of its Recommendations must demonstrate and be seen to demonstrate Business Unusual and Change for Best starting from OPGA, EOSG, UN CEB, UNDESA, UNDP and ECOSOC Office and expanding rapidly to all other UN System including WBG and IMF Entities. To Kick Start this, we suggest:-

a)      One Worldwide Approach as Robust as 3PCM should be selected immediately.

b)      Global Coordinating Internal Consultant should be appointed immediately.

c)      Global Coordinating External Consultant should be appointed immediately.

d)      Master MSP that is Multidisciplinary Professionals Community of Practice on Poverty Elimination and Environmental Sustainability that each of the 306/193 UN Member States accord Official Status should be established immediately.

e)      First Draft SG Report on this UNDESA and UNDP e-Discussion 2016 and ISPE-EAG Focused Points for ECOSOC e-Discussion 2016 Papers Part 1 – Part 5 should be circulated as Background Papers to all Organizers, Presenters and Participants at ECOSOC Partnership Forum 31 March 2016.

f)       Final Copy SG Report on this UNDESA and UNDP e-Discussion 2016, ISPE-EAG Focused Points for ECOSOC e-Discussion 2016 Papers Part 1 – Part 5 and ECOSOC Partnership Forum Outcome Document should be circulated as Background Papers to all Organizers, Presenters and Participants at PGA convened High Level Thematic Debate on Achieving SDG 21 April 2016.

g)      Co-Facilitators appointed by PGA to review SG Report on Follow Up and Review could consider reorganizing their Global Consultation to meet Standard set by this UNDESA and UNDP e-Discussion. They could circulate Final Copy SG Report on this UNDESA and UNDP e-Discussion 2016, ISPE-EAG Focused Points for ECOSOC e-Discussion 2016 Papers Part 1 – Part 5, ECOSOC Partnership Forum 31 March 2016  Outcome Document and PGA convened High Level Thematic Debate on Achieving SDG 21 April 2016 Outcome as Background Papers to all Organizers, Presenters and Participants. The point we are making is that all future Global Consultations must build on the outcome of past Global Consultations in the New Dispensation to avoid Duplication, Diversion, Distraction, Drawback that were the case in the past up to the present time.

h)      Measures for full Implementation as well as effective Monitoring and Evaluation of the Implementation of all Recommendations and Provisions in Global Consultations Outcome Reports should be established immediately. These Measures should ensure that all whose ideas and suggestions are included in Global Consultations Outcome Reports are meaningfully involved in the practical Implementation of these ideas and suggestions. There is no way, those who were not part of generating these ideas and suggestions, can make better success or indeed any success than the Originators / Creators of these Ideas and Suggestions. This accounted for the flaws and failures, recorded in the implementation of past Global Consultation Outcome Reports and is Mistake that must be avoided in the New Dispensation.

i)        UN CEB First Session April 27 and 28 2016 needs to make clear Statement on ways and means UN System including WBG and IMF Entities should in the New Dispensation proceed in the work towards finding correct answer to Global Goals AAAA, SDG, COP21, Agenda 21 How To(s) and Know How(s) within the Statutory Responsibility, Mission and Vision of each UN System including WBG and IMF Entity.

j)        The Task to Make UN System including WBG and IMF, that is UNO, WBG and IMFG Entities Fit for the 21st Century is a Task That Must Be Done.

 

4.   The implication of (3) is that fundamental issues of OH3A2T2LRSP - Ownership, Harmonization, Alignment, Accountability, Attitude, Transparency, Transformation, Leadership, Learning, Results, Stakeholders Participation should be effectively addressed in the First as well as Final Draft SG Report on this UNDESA and UNDP e-Discussion 2016. Invited we are glad to share our thoughts on way forward in this regard.

5.    As the SG rounds up his tenor, he would be leaving Lasting Legacies in the Empowerment and Unification of Citizens within and between each of the 306/193 UN Member States, if the Final Copy SG Report on this UNDESA and UNDP e-Discussion actually answer How To(s) and Know How(s) questions.

6.    To operationalize in practice (1) – (5) in each UNO, WBG and IMFG Entity Fit for the 21st Century, there is a need for National Leaders and World Leaders on 306/193 UN Member States and UN System including WBG and IMF sides to appreciate that just as in Healthy Living: Your Food is Your Medicine and Your Medicine is Your Food, also in Productive Reforms: Your Policy, Program, Project Interventions, 3PIs is Your 3PIs Training and Your 3PIs Training is Your 3PIs. This is what makes correct answer to How To(s) and Know How(s) questions essentially issue of DOING – Action and Accomplishment whereas correct answers to What questions essentially issue of SAYING – Talking and Thinking.

7.    The work towards achieving increasing convergence between National Goals aligned and harmonized with Global Goals is a DOING Matter and not a SAYING Matter. UN CEB November 2015 acknowledges that UN Member States are looking up to the UN System including WBG and IMF for help to achieve the Global Goals by 2030 Target date. The Summary of Conclusions provides Evidence that the UN System including WBG and IMF themselves need help before they can be in a position to help Member States. This UNDESA and UNDP e-Discussion 2016 has shed light as to where this help could come from. The Ball is in the Court of National and World Leaders .....

Best wishes.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your fruitful contribution to this e-discussion. The Week 4 report should be published soon and participants will be allowed to comment on it for its improvement.

Lanre Rotimi (not verified)

Dear e-Discusssion Facilitator from Brazil,

Thanks for welcoming our contribution. As UNDESA and UNDP prepare the First Draft SG Outcome Report of this e-Discussion 2016 that is Robust Synthesis of all harvested good ideas and pertient suggestions, please take a critical look at points make in Article on link below, which underline points we consistently made during this Global Consultation and could encourage the Drafters of the SG Report to ensure it is indeed Vision and Words with ACTION that is sufficietly All Inclusive, All Embracing and Ambitious to help all Village to Global Stakeholders on 306/193 UN Member States; UN System including WBG and IMF; MGoS Member CSOs'/NGOs'; Non MGoS Member CSOs'/NGOs'; Academic Institutions; Traditional, Religious and Community Institutions and Media Institutions sides achieve increasing convergence between National Development Plans aligned and harmonized with Global Goals - revised AAAA, SDG, COP21 Outcome, Agenda 21, ECOSOC Retreat Outcome, e-Discussion 2016 Outcome, UN Retreat on MSP Outcome etc Vision Intention and Reality and by 2030 Target Date.

http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/sue-unsworth-s-upside-down-view

We do look forward to commenting on the improvement of the First Draft SG Report after it is released.

Best wishes.

Fathin Faridah • from Indonesia

Implementation of the agenda in 2030 still need to be reviewed. In Indonesia, where in a developing country, the development of technology can actually trigger clashes between groups of people. As was busy discussed, disputes between public transport with transport-based online lead anarchist demonstration in the capital.Sustainable development is very important, because the lack of rigor of law enforcement for the burning of tens of thousands of hectares of forest in Indonesia by palm oil companies. Habitat destruction host of wildlife that make them endangered also continue to occur.However, technological advances have made Technopreneurship sector in Indonesia has increased sharply. It should be noted in support of economic growth.Instead of talking to the real action, some of the points on the agenda in 2030 still need to be fought in order to be applied in developing countries, my country as an example.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your contribution. The technopreneurship sector can also contribute to the achievement of the SDGs, both for the solutions it can create fos sustainable development and its contribution to the economy.

Susan Roylance

Acknowledge that the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development is “grounded in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights” which states that “The family is the natural and fundamental group unit of society," and the World Summit for Social Development and twenty-fourth special session of the General Assembly state that the family “plays a key role in social development" (Social Summit, 26-b and twenty-fourth special session of the General Assembly, para 25 and 56).

As we empower the family unit to achieve the SDGs millions of groups will work togther to accomplish the important goals and targets.  If government on ly treats people as individuals, the burden is on government to produce.  As the government empowers family units, the burden on government is reduced, and the result is sustainable development!

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. How do you believe families can be mobilized to support the process of mainstreaming the SDGs into national policy/strategies?

Susan Roylance

Please acknowledge that the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development is “grounded in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights” (paragraph 10-13) which states that “The family is the natural and fundamental group unit of society," and the World Summit for Social Development and twenty-fourth special session of the General Assembly state that the family “plays a key role in social development" (Social Summit, 26-b and twenty-fourth special session of the General Assembly, para 25 and 56).As we empower the family unit to achieve the SDGs millions of groups will work together to accomplish the important goals and targets. If government only treats people as individuals, the burden is on government to produce. As governments empower family units, the burden on government is reduced, and the result is sustainable development!

Mohammed Eid

Speaking about making progress on and building national and sub-national capacities for sustainable development, and how can partnerships effectively contribute to capacity building and sustainable development;  

I think its very critical to take into consideration the advocacy issue, less people are involved due to the lack of proper advocacy. Speaking of one the UN agencies where I work, at the UNRWA many of the programs are doomed to fail due to lack of involvement. Only few people are aware of the goals and aims, and I can certainly confirm that many of the stakeholders has not heard of 2030 agenda and its sub-goals We need to put the people in the driving seat, we need to involve them more often in a way that will inform them more often about the main goals and the sustainability plans.  Programs should not be cut out of the context, and help should be sought from the media to keep the people informed about the plans, the agenda and the progress made so far.

 

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. Some of the other participants in our e-discussion have mentioned the role of media, such as radio in rural areas, as a tool to keep people informed and further discussions/actions on the SDGs. What do you think are the main obstacles to stakeholders to put forth proper advocacy on the 2030 Agenda? How can the stakeholders overcome such obstacles?

Priscilla (not verified)

Though not directed to me this question, in that we experience the same problem , I will respond with what I have observed to be the obstacle. Starting with the basics , being lack of clear communication strategy , clarity on whom the target is and the message we want to pass. At most the technical people in any field do not simplify their technical words and thus most of the audience who are not in that field loose interest, however good the technical document is if the target group cannot understand it then it looses interest and this has been one of the problems in our advocacy and especially to policy makers, thus you end up communicating to your group only. Thus the rules of having an advocacy strategy and for technical staff ensuring communication depts are fully part of the process will be important among ourselves if simply I put SDGs is ok but to someone else this abbreviation just locks him/her out. Let our advocacy have clear strategy of what. Whom to,How and when we want to advocate. 2nd is on use of data, putting on so much.with no clear interpretation. Let's get into habit of involving the communication people's to proof read in particular documents to external readers and always ensure the data used if any is minimal just for enhancing the information provided. Thank you.Priscilla

Rita Luthra

Please remove my e-mail from your mailing list

 

Thank you

 

 

Rita Luthra, MD

President

Women's Health and Education Center (WHEC)

NGO in Special Consultative Status with Economic and Social Council of the United Nations

Editor-in-Chief of e-Health Publication

http://www.WomensHealthSection.com

 

From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org] Sent: Saturday, March 26, 2016 11:06 AMTo: rita@womenshealthsection.comSubject: [World We Want 2030] Priscilla DRR Programme Officer from Kenya commented on the Discussion "National Implementation"

 

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. Improving advocacy can further engagement and ownership.

Jessie Lydia Henshaw • Senior Scientist at HDS Natural Systems Design Science from United States

My thoughts are in the answer to these four questions:    My consulting credentials are in the attached resume'.

1.       What does it take to galvanize new cross-sectoral partnerships?

Jessie Henshaw: Partnerships are like families, everyone having the same and separate agendas, the cohesion from an ability to work as a whole, making decisions for the whole, different parties making differing independent contributions.  This same principle of “whole system design” applies to the world societies and cultures the SDG’s are designed to serve.  In the nature of whole systems, it becomes whole system development that moves the real welfare of any part.   So for the SDG’s, the goal of all partners should be to contribute to the development of the whole, leaving no constituency out, in each one’s different way.   

Case A: For example, UN monitored and regulated partnerships are needed to assure the system as a whole remains faithful to the UN mandate, and that the distribution of support makes the most use of it.   Just as in a family, those “top-down” partnerships need inspire and serve the “bottom-up” partnerships that will had more direct local understanding of the needs and abilities of societies as they seek to pull themselves together to grow and prosper as a whole.  

Case B: The nature of whole family or culture growth and development is a matter of discovery and sharing, from new points of view, often arising from seemingly ‘alien’ sources.  So everyone become a “knowledge worker” in that sense, alert to possible meanings of unfamiliar change and potential, much more of a “search process” than a “power play”.   So using what is called “big data” to locate interesting or surprising patterns, social, technological, institutional, like emerging trends of either “things working” or “things failing”, and having vital conversations everywhere, is needed to feed the genius of the cultures and letting it flow to where it’s needed.   It might very well be facilitated by a “knowledge extension service” in every region (i.e. mobile librarian perhaps, connecting local groups with knowledge resources) or other kinds of innovations, to make better use of the human creativity available from near and far.

2.       How can the UN system strengthen coherence and coordination of UN-led multi-stakeholder partnerships? What are the additional challenges involved in ensuring the transparency and accountability of cross-sectoral multi-stakeholder partnerships, and how can these be addressed?

Jessie Henshaw:  The “whole system” approach expands the “nexus” idea to the limit, seeing “development” not as a list of projects at all, but as a way of supporting the growth of human cultures by self-determination, inspired and aided by the UN vision and programs, but to achieve their own ends, the securing of their homes and fulfillment of their own way of life.   This new way of interpreting the SDG’s, as for inspiring and enabling the cultural growth, development and security of human societies, in effect conceptually turns “inside out” the statement of the UN SDG plan, which had been described as being for promoting targeted interventions in struggling societies, to push and prod them to achieve certain “targets”.     

 It makes each culture’s own growth in seeking its own way of life, the “nexus” of every single one of the SDG goals and targets.

The real “nexus” of any successful economic or social development is always the success of the developing culture’s ambitions itself, making the role of all the goals, targets, outside governments and organizations secondary.  Their principal job in fostering the SDG’s would be to condone, respect and give heartfelt support to each society’s own culture’s self-fulfillment.

The most natural way to do that is to recognize the natural “nexus” of each developing culture as a whole.   “The real “nexus” of any successful economic or social development is always the success of the developing culture’s ambitions itself, making the role of all the goals, targets, outside governments and organizations secondary.  Their principal job in fostering the SDG’s would be to condone, respect and give heartfelt support to each society’s own culture’s self-fulfillment.

3.       How can multi-stakeholder partnerships involving the United Nations be more transparent and accountable?

Jessie Henshaw: Learning to act in a way that is transparent to other actors, and to the cultures within which one is acting, is a rather tall order.   So far all the expert measurement groups in the sciences and at the UN that I’ve tried to work with, actually seem to have rebelled against starting to be transparent regarding the actual scale of cultural and ecological impacts we are responsible for as a result of using money.   It’s a highly solvable accounting problem, based on how we keep track of money and use it so widely to organize so much of society.   So given that, a very simple principle of accounting for “average” cases can be also adjusted for “exceptions”.

“Average shares of benefits of a whole system for producing them has average shares of responsibility for the costs.”   

No one wants to do it though, as it would mean “internalizing all externalities” of the economy in a very visible way.

In effect it would sweep out all “the elephants from under the carpet” we’ve been storing up, hiding all the side effects of altering the earth in ever bigger ways ever faster... as if saved for some  future day.  The scientific purpose would be to just have an honest accounting of what we are choosing to do with our financial decisions.  I think we’d quickly find that with a holistic view of what clearly measurable costs to our future our spending is accumulating today…  we would realize every dollar is making lasting changes to the earth.  We’d be still glad to have them, but would become cautions and in a stepwise fashion begin to think much more carefully what we do with them.

There are other kinds of transparency too.   It’s hard for different organizations to be transparent with each other, as they all think differently, for one thing.   Most of the time the standard of “truth” people use is what I call the “economic standard”, presenting things in the most profitable way to the presenter.  There is another kind, the  “trust standard”.   The trust standard is to be “not-misleading”, as an offer to correct or clarify if what was said turns out to be misinterpreted.   It’s oddly the standard practice in designing computers, that any message sent is checked to see if it was received, to not be misleading.    If organizations agreed to the “trust standard” they’d quickly learn they could challenge anyone who, as is common practice today, effectively “telling the biggest fib they can get away with”, using the “economic standard” of the truth.   

4.       How can the UN improve its due diligence, monitoring and review of its partnerships that contribute to the implementation of the 2030 Agenda?

 

Jessie Henshaw: If the objective is not to serve the UN, per se, but to serve the growth and development of each culture being inspired and enabled to seek its own purposes, it would seem to greatly complicate the monitoring.  It could be seen as very usefully dividing the job in two.   There’s 1) the communicating to and getting feedback from the culture being served, then 2) the internal accounting of agencies for how well they themselves think they used their resources.   That may indeed greatly simplify the task in the end.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your participation. The questions you addressed will be further discussed during the 2016 ECOSOC Partnership Forum “From commitments to results: Leveraging partnerships for the 2030 Agenda”, qhich wil be held at the United Nations Headquarters on March 31st, 2016. For more information on the 2016 ECOSOC Partnership Forum, please check: https://www.un.org/ecosoc/en/node/355639.

Ruzanna Tarverdyan • Founding President at The Geneva Consensus Foundation

The economist as such does not advocate criteria of optimality. He may invent them. He may discuss their pros and cons, sometimes before but preferably after trying out their implications. But the ultimate choice is made…by the procedures of decision making inherent in the institutions, laws and customs of society. A wide range of professional competences enters into the preparation and deliberation of these decisions. To the extent that the economist takes part on this decisive phase, he does so in a double role, as economist, and a citizen of his polity: local polity, national polity or world Tjalling Koopmans, Nobel Memorial Lecture, 1975

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. Considering that a "wide range of professional competences enters into the preparation and deliberation of these decisions", how do you believe that the SDGs can be effectively mainstreamed into relevant national sustainable development policies and programmes, while preserving countries' policy space to pursue national priorities?

Ruzanna Tarverdyan • Founding President at The Geneva Consensus Foundation

We submit that the solutions for Sustainable development in the interconnected Global world- two multiple dimensional phenomenon, entail a significant paradigm shift towards systems analysis and matrix thinking to address inter-temporal effectiveness-efficiency-equity challenges for future generations.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your contribution. Could you tell us more about how the frameworks you shared were designed? Do you believe their use can support the mainstreaming of the SDGs and also further stakeholders engagement in the national implementation of the 2030 Agenda?

Reza Muhammad

Countries those who ratified the convenan on ECOSOC and Supporting the declaration of related rights (e.g right to water and sanitation) should make a progress report, national and International communities should work to push for it. Otherwise governments will manipulate the resources management reports to hide in the artificial crisis (crisis by design). Without such efforts, SDGs will be used only to involve private sector without maximum efforts by the government.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. You mentioned that national and international communities should be involved in monitoring and pushing for the implementation of public policies on the 2030 Agenda. What do you believe needs to be done to ensure the participation of all stakeholders in the national implementation and progress monitoring for the SDGs?

Marcotulio Humberto Cardona

Los ODS deben integrarse en los planes quinquenales de los gobiernos nacionales, municipales, locales, para que las politicas publicas funcionen y cumplan con los objetivos, hay varios objetivos que tienes que ver con la salud, con el medio ambiente, acabar con la pobreza, la educacion, una educacion gratuita y publica, derecho al agua, que haya paz que las instutuciones funcionen, que se cumpla la justicia, lo que faltaria es que haya dialogo y comunicacion entre los gobiernos y la sociedad civil y los movimientos sociales, que se velen y se respeten los derechos de las minorias, como son los adultos mayores, mujeres, jovenes, niños y niñas, migrantes

E-discussion Facilitator

Gracias por su participación. Usted ha sugerido que los ODS "deben integrarse en los planes quinquenales de los gobiernos nacionales, municipales, locales". Qué cree que es necesario para que los gobiernos, en todos los niveles, efectivamente incluyan los ODS en su planificación?

Además, has mencionado que, para que los derechos de las personas sean alcanzados, "lo que faltaria es que haya dialogo y comunicacion entre los gobiernos y la sociedad civil y los movimientos sociales". Qué hacer para que la sociedad civil, el sector privado y las demás partes interesadas participen activamente de la formulación de políticas públicas?

Salma Zaki Nashef • Assistant Professor at The Private University for Medical Sciences from Jordan

Hi..

As concern question number 2 (key areas for making progress on and building national and sub-national capacities for sustainable development) I can say that the most important key area is EDUCATION, by education & it's reform we can change a lot , knowledge, values & attitudes which is the most important of the people personality & skills which is also very important in preparing people for better future with a profession to help economically.

 

Another key element is the JUSTICE everywhere & in every aspect in order for other values to take it's place like tolerance & human rights. And most important for Justice is for women to take her role in leadership or work in general.

 

A third key area is helping the surpass person especially women to give the benefits of her capabilities to others by providing the healthy environment for her to be adopted & give her the chance to work .

 

4th key is to change the attitudes of leaders & decision makers about their way of chosing people for senior positions in the country tword abilities of person , capabilities, knowledge & experiences & not to rely that on "Wasta" & favoritism. 

 

For the other part of the question ( how do they differ across country contexts (e.g. least developed countries, middle income countries, high-income countries, countries in situations of fragility etc.) the difference is in the degree of implementation  & not in the elements involved.

 

For the last part of the same question (When and how can partnerships effectively contribute to capacity building and sustainable development?) I can say that partnerships can effectively contribute to sustainable development nationally & internationally when they asked for that formally from responsble persons & given the suitable reinfrocement & motives.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. Regarding the role of partnerships in capacity building for development, you suggested that effective contribution can be offered when partners are formaly invited and motived by those responsible. Who/which organizations do you believe is/are responsible for furthering partnerships? How can "formal" partnerships be established in countries so as to effectively contribute to capacity building for development?

Hans Friederich (not verified)

Dear Moderator

INBAR has prepared the attached briefing notes for its 41 Member States to guide them in incorporating bamboo and rattan in their development plans for the future.  Bamboo and rattan are no solutions in isolation, but they should be included in the full spectrum of development options, as they can help achieve several SDGs.

Thank you for your attention

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your contribution. In the briefing note you shared, the International Network for Bamboo and Rattan (INBAR) suggests how the production of bamboo and rattan can contribute to the achievement of several SDGs, from SDG 1 (end of poverty) to SDG 11 (Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable). The briefing note is good example of how partnerships can support knowledge and experience sharing. Could you give us more examples on how organizations such as INBAR can contribute to capacity building that supports the achievement of the SDGs?

Nadya Dobretsova (not verified)

Key drivers of development in any country, including the Kyrgyz Republic - are the state, business and public sector. Sustainable development in the interests of people becomes the result of balanced and effective interaction of the mentioned three drivers. Moreover, each party must have clear goals, objectives, motives and mechanisms for participation in the development process. Each party must have clear understanding of each other’s roles and contributions to the development, which is impossible without a clear framework for cooperation and an enabling environment for operation of each of the parties with maximum efficiency. By 2016 the Kyrgyz Republic has a situation when the roles, contributions and enabling environment are formed only in respect of the state (to a greater extent) and business (to a lesser extent). The state establishes rules of the game, adopts laws, performs other functions understandable to everyone. The business produces values, creates jobs and pays taxes. With respect to the public sector and the most proactive part - civil society – there is no formed clear and meaningful vision of its role, contribution and favorable environment. Neither the state nor the business does not fully understand the role and objectives of the public sector, why its existence and level of development are not less important. At this stage it is meaningless to speak about the causes of this situation, it is wiser to take it as an evolutionary and objective reality and to address the challenge - to form the frameworks comprehensible to all parties for the contributions, roles and enabling environment for the public sector in order to ensure sustainable development of the Kyrgyz Republic taking into account the balanced contribution by the three leading drivers in the development. However, it requires much effort from the civil society itself - to create its contribution to sustainable development, find and publish indicators that demonstrate the accountability of civil society to its beneficiaries. Unfortunately, a common world practice on civil society accountability does not exist. That would be great to have a system to measure the contribution and accountability of the public sector.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your contribution. You argued that, for partnerships to foster sustainable development, both a "clear framework for cooperation and an enabling environment for operation of each of the parties" are necessary. You also suggested that the civil society in your country needs to make an effort not only to define its vision and role in the national development, but also to develop accountability mechanisms. What do think needs to be done for civil society to get organized in the Kyrgyz Republic so as to actively contribute to capacity building for development? What do you believe other stakeholders, such as the government, private sector and the UN can do to support civil society?

Kim Gleeson

Dear Colleagues,

I am concerned by the effectiveness of accountability mechanisms, the ownership of public goods and who will in fact benefit from the engagement of private sector actors in the realization of the SDGs and Financing for Development. There appears to be a keen focus on Private Public Partnerships (PPP) in the realization of these goals, with the reference to the shortfall of funding requirements. Whilst I note that many participants highligh the important role of civil society actors and a free media in the process,  I am concerned by what I perceive to be divergent relations of power and influence in real world settings. National and community ownership, a central role in the decision making process for representative community actors I believe is foundational to advance the SDGs. Co-operative and community ownership structures should be accorded equal status in any and all development financing projects. The process in my view must not create a situation where essentail public goods for example water utilities end up being owned and controlled by private sector actors. Similarly health, education, essential public infrastructures.. et el. There is a global movement towards the ever increasing privatization of public services and goods. Recent new multilateral  trade deals have raised concerns over the arbitration of sovereignty disputes being settled by private sector courts, in disputes involving foundational health, environmental and minimum wage concerns. There already exists in my view a major imbalance of power to realize the public interest concerns of populations in most countries in the world, where inequality has been consistently highlighted as an ever growing reality. Elites exist, are real, and exercise power in every country.  Consultations not yeilding public interest results, supposed participatory mechanisms while the real power remains with elites, selective transparencies have seemed too often to predominant. Too often if there are any accountability mechanisms, they lack resources, staff, operate within very narrow regulatory frameworks,  lack effective enforcement mechanisms or offer tokenistic ones, and are led by management drawn from the pre-existing power relations status quo. For many in the private sector, a self-regulatory framework is the preferred option.  Such realities have led to illicit financial flows, tax avoidance, trade misinvoicing to the tune of hundreds of billions of dollars. This within the preexisting supposed legal frameworks. To address widespread poverty, inequalities and disadvantages truely effective mechanisms must be established to give power and ownership to the people.  So often the solutions offered are top down strategies that benefit most those advantaged by the existing unequal power relations. Bottom up, grassroots, local,  community ownership cannot be just jargon and minimalistic additions. They must be central to realization of all the strategies.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. You suggested that  in order to "address widespread poverty, inequalities and disadvantages truely effective mechanisms must be established to give power and ownership to the people". Can you give us examples of such mechanisms and share lessons learned with their creating? How to ensure community engagement in such initiatives?

Regarding the engagement of the private sector in the realization of the SDGs, the United Nations Global Compact is an important example of how voluntary initiatives guided by the UN system can ensure the implementation of universal sustainability principles and support UN goals through the private sector. More information on the Global Compact can be found at the initiative’s website: https://www.unglobalcompact.org.

Kim Gleeson

Dear E-discussion Facilitator,Thank you for your reply. I am aware of the UN Global Compact Initiative and its voluntary character and whilst I generally support the principles espoused I consider it to be ineffective in realizing its goals to be frank. There is substantial difference between intent and actions. This is a foundational problem, across too many sectors. For example, the Sustainable Development Solutions Network Director's report of the costs to realize the SDGs annually did not include any budgeting at all for social safety net programs, or social protection floor initiatives. Which to be frank beggars belief. When I raised this circumstance with the former director of the Sustainable Development Solutions Network Asia Pacific focal point, he advised for example that the Australian Government did not want to discuss socio-economic rights in the SDGs in our national settings. Similar views by Governments have been evident in other developed countries. Austerity budgeting according to economic rationalists programs advanced by international financial institutions and market orthodoxies have seen social budgets reduced worldwide, with potential further cuts to come. Levels unemployment increase, ongoing pressures to lower minimum wages, pensions falling across the board. The GFC and its consequences were a creation of the market. Companies associated with the Global Compact have also been implicated in offshore tax avoidance. Leading international corporations, from many countries advanced and developing economies, no one seems to have a monopoly on tax avoidance and minimalization schemes instituted by the world's leading financial and accounting firms . We are told shareholders are only seeking to maximize profits for their shareholders. Whilst I acknowledge the needs for funding, I remain alarmed at what I perceive to be the tokenistic regard accorded to any effective accountability mechanisms, the lack of independent oversight, and who indeed will be responsible for protecting the people's interests. I now am unmoved by the notion that career compliant bureaucrats, multinational corporations, and academics whose universities are increasingly dependent on corporate support and fee paying students will uphold the people's interests. I readily acknowledge there are also of course well intentioned, intelligent and many capable people across these arena's in specialized domains. I acknowledge the need to grow the economy and the role of business and the private sector. But the brutal reality of private sector involvement is self interest, profits for shareholders. Whilst lip service will of course be paid to humanistic concerns. The more profits the better is of course the ideal circumstance. Who then exactly will be responsible to balance the ledger in the peoples interest. National Governments, desperate for investment? Ministers, members of parliament looking to their future careers in the corporate sector? The thousands of corporate lobbyists seeking to optimize commercial advantages? My observation is in fact  many good people with sound intentions exist but are marginalized when there's money to be made. The most compliant will work within the systems to seek incremental change, whilst profound structual inequities remain. I do support the SDGs, I have reported on their development for a number of years, as I did with regards to the MDGs. I have actively sought to advance respect and regard for the Universal Declaration of Human Rights for some 20 years. There are many others in many states guided by a commitment to advancing the well being of others, not their own personal self interest or for the profit of shareholders. We work at the coal face so to speak - in community sector agencies, in schools, hospitals, universities. We are the workers, not the factory owners.  We are the ones who will realise the changes the SDGs seek to realise. We need the support. Not business, not politicians, not bureaucrats. Yes of course we must have their support, involvement, commitment. But they cannot be in the drivers seat to trickle down the benefits of economic growth. If there's to be investment in public assets it must remain 51% nationally owned in the public interest. Why can't superannuation, pension funds, banks lend to community owned public infrastructure entities, at a reasonable rate of return, with the ownership retained by for the people? Why is it proposed for such entities to be privatizatized? Why are UN agencies shepharding such developments? The UN Charter, starts with "We the People", let the 2030 Agenda actually be in the people's interests. I understand there are many dimensions and aspects to the 2030 Agenda. However, I am choosing to focus on one particular dimension on this occasion.

----- Original Message -----From: comment@unteamworks.orgTo:<kgleeson@netspace.net.au>Cc:Sent:Thu, 24 Mar 2016 21:21:22 +0000Subject:[World Humanitarian Summit] E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil commented on the Discussion "National Implementation"

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. Fighting corruption has been recognized by participants of our e-discussion as a pivotal area for improvement if countries wish to successfully implement development agendas. Creating effective accountability mechanisms, as you have mentioned, is a crucial step towards that goal.

Kim Gleeson

 Yes fighting corruption is essential and its a multi-dimensional reality, and that includes addressing corporate and regulatory capture of all levels of Governance - international, regional, national, state, sub-state and local.

----- Original Message -----From: comment@unteamworks.orgTo:<kgleeson@netspace.net.au>Cc:Sent:Mon, 28 Mar 2016 01:20:02 +0000Subject:[World Humanitarian Summit] E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil commented on the Discussion "National Implementation"<

Rita Luthra

Please Remove my e-mail from your mailing list

 

Thank you

 

 

Rita Luthra, MD

President

Women's Health and Education Center (WHEC)

NGO in Special Consultative Status with Economic and Social Council of the United Nations

Editor-in-Chief of e-Health Publication

http://www.WomensHealthSection.com

 

From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org] Sent: Sunday, March 27, 2016 9:19 PMTo: rita@womenshealthsection.comSubject: [World We Want 2030] E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil commented on the Discussion "National Implementation"

 

Kim Gleeson

UN rights expert urges Liberia not to hand public education over to a private company

GENEVA (22 March 2016) – It is completely unacceptable for Liberia to outsource its primary education system to a private company, said the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the right to education, Kishore Singh. “This is unprecedented at the scale currently being proposed and violates Liberia’s legal and moral obligations,” he stressed.  Liberia’s plan is to privatise all primary and pre-primary schools over the next five years. Public funding will support services subcontracted to a private company - the Bridge International Academies. “Public schools and their teachers, and the concept of education as a public good, are under attack,” the expert cautioned.

“Such arrangements are a blatant violation of Liberia’s international obligations under the right to education, and have no justification under Liberia’s constitution,” the Special Rapporteur stated. “This also contradicts political commitments made by Liberia and the international community to the fourth UN Sustainable Development Goal which is on education and related targets.”

“Provision of public education of good quality is a core function of the State. Abandoning this to the commercial benefit of a private company constitutes a gross violation of the right to education,” emphasised Mr. Singh.

The human rights expert noted that “it is ironic that Liberia does not have resources to meet its core obligations to provide a free primary education to every child, but it can find huge sums of money to subcontract a private company to do so on its behalf,” he said.

“These sums could be much better spent on improving the existing system of public education and supporting the educational needs of the poor and marginalized,” suggested the Special Rapporteur.

Mr. Singh called on the Government of Liberia to approach the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) for technical assistance and capacity building, instead of entering into such partnerships with for-profit providers in education, “devoid of any legal or moral justification.”

“Before any partnership is entered into, the Government of Liberia must first put into place legislation and policies on public private partnerships in education, which among other things, protect every child’s right to education,” Mr. Singh said.

“There also needs to be an independent body or institution established to receive complaints of potential violations of the right to education that might result from this development,” he added.

The Special Rapporteur emphasised that “education is an essential public service and instead of supporting business in education, governments should increase the money they spend on public educational services to make them better.”

- See more at: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=18506&…

http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=185062… Rights expert urges Liberia not to hand over public education to a private company.Can you please add this to my last post on the 2030 Agenda. National Implementation. I have been having problems with email or adding onsite. My apologies for any multiple correspondence. I have 'mysteriously' now having problems corresponding..RegardsKim Gleeson. Director, Universal Rights Network

----- Original Message -----From:comment@unteamworks.orgTo:<kgleeson@netspace.net.au>Cc:Sent:Thu, 24 Mar 2016 21:21:22 +0000Subject:[World Humanitarian Summit] E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil commented on the Discussion "National Implementation"<

Valerie Terry Ellis • Member of the international Board of Directors at Creative Educators International Network (CEIN)

Valerie Ellis, NGO based in Washington, D.C.Creative Educators International Network, Inc. is committed to the role of education in uniting stakeholders and nations toward the accomplishment of AGENDA 2030. Ultimately, it will be the power of the world's people with their immense storehouse of energy, wisdom and creativity that will solve the problems facing us. This is not a top down process. It is our firm believe that education weaves together the many threads of the SDGs. In each of the 17 areas, education will play a crucial role. By education, I mean the empowerment and dignity that it offers, and that will drive the work that needs to be done. Our three programs: International Peace Education, Value Creating Gardening and Sustainable Community Education embody what we believe is most important in education: that it be directed toward the most basic foundation necessary for a sustainable future. Peace and the commitment to resolve conflict without violence. Our relationship with nature, particularly food. And Community engagement. This type of education is a lifelong process. It begins from even before a child is born, and continues until death. Our world is characterized by constant and rapid change. The world's people all need ongoing opportunities to refresh their understanding of the times and strengthen their ability to contribute throughout their lifespan.

Salma Zaki Nashef • Assistant Professor at The Private University for Medical Sciences from Jordan

I agree totally with what Valerie Ellis wrote, I can stress the point of  positive values & attitudes since there is a lot missed in our societies such as truth , love to read, love to write, tolerance, respect others, respect time, justice, apreciation of other's skills, abilities, capabilities & experiences, respect age ..& many others, this concentration in one way or another on the practical side can reduce violence.

Another point I'd like to stress is the quality of teacher & the ethics of teaching profession which is a reflect of an authentic teaching - learning process.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. Several of the participants of our e-discussion have commented on the role of inclusive education and training in building capacity to promote sustainable development. I recommend you to check Syeda Hamid's post on teacher education.

Could you share with us what Creative Educators International Network have been doing in order to unite "stakeholders and nations toward the accomplishment of AGENDA 2030"?

Valerie Terry Ellis • Member of the international Board of Directors at Creative Educators International Network (CEIN)

Creative Educators International Network, Inc. based in Washington, D.C.The other important element which we believe is extremely important as far as implementation and coordination is how we evaluate the work being done, based on its contribution toward reaching the SDGs. Traditional methods of measuring sustainability have value, but also have limitations. Over the course of a year, I searched out and reviewed dozens of different measurement tools offered by a variety of NGOs and various public or private entities around the world, and passed this information on to the chair of our Sustainable Communities Education program. Using her skills as a PhD expert in human potential and synergetics, she developed a tool that evaluates the existing Balance of Forces that pull against or push forward sustainability in a community, whether a classroom or a neighborhood or a local government. We are currently piloting this tool, and will begin scaling up its use in 2017-18. We realize that evaluating progress already is a critical aspect that has been addressed already in the planning for implementation. This dialogue needs to to continue, and more critical thinking should be directed at the quantitative and qualitative changes going on among individuals and communities when they play a direct role in planning the steps and then evaluating the progress they are making toward realization of the SDGs. The tool we have developed facilitates both of these aspects: Realizing where you and your community stands, and where you and they can best take the first steps, and then the next steps, etc. Evaluation with self-generated feedback! This is another way to empower people as the engine of change.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your contribution to our e-discussion. Do you believe that the tool your organization has developed can help communities to push for the inclusion of the SDGs into national development policies and strategies?

Asela • from Sri Lanka

Interesting to see the e-discussion. Global Parliamentarians Forum for Evaluation (GPFE) https://globalparliamentarianforum.wordpress.com/ promotes National Evaluation Policies and systems at country level. GPFE works with parliamentarians, government representatives and VOPEs (Voluntary Organizations for Professional Evaluations) to promote enabling environment for evaluation including SDGs. We have conducted a global study on national evaluation policies and found out that only about 20 countries have formal NEPs. http://www.pfde.net/index.php/publications-resources/global-mapping-rep… Also we have documented case studies of NEPs from selected countries. http://www.pfde.net/index.php/publications-resources/2014-02-28-19-08-54 Also I would like to share the resource on "National evaluation policies for sustainable and equitable development" http://www.mymande.org/sites/default/files/files/NationalEvaluationPoli… In this year we have launched a webinar series called "Meet a parliamentarian" and also a video campaign with parliamentarians to promote evaluation of sustainable development https://parliamentariansforevaluationcampaign.wordpress.com/ Happy to share more on this platform. 

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. Many of the participants in our e-discussion have brought up the role of parliaments in both mainstreaming the SDGs at the national/local levels and monitoring the implementation of national policies/programs for sustainable development. What are your thoughts on the issue?

Sameera

when a country is fighting with corruption due to the mismanagement of the funds , lack of professional people in government, how would be possible to mainstream the SDGs in National development policies ? When the roof of the home is spoiled how the family will live in that home ?Therefore First of all the Government of the Less Development countrie should be in priority to spend on the capacity building of the governance people, and let them know well about the SDGs, as they may not know much about and not be aware of the SDGs yet even, & whenever Gov is well educated about SDGs , later they will be able that how to mainstream the SDGs in national Development strategy.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. Other participants of our e-discussion have posted comments that agree with your suggestion that capacity building for government officials and the dissemination of the SDGs within the government are essencial to achieving progress on the SDGs. What do you believe would be the role of the UN in that process?

SYEDA HAMID

I suggest, if one developed country should adapt (by keeping aid/funds in own custody) at least three poor countries and fully support their education system especially Teacher Education (TE) for the true implementation of the 2030 Agenda for SD.

Why education system and why focus on TE because the teacher education (TE)? see the answer

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. In the file you share, you highlight the role of teachers as leaders and catalysts of sustainable development by suggesting that "peer-exchange can be nurtured at grass root level through the teacher education (TE)". How do you believe teachers can be organized so as to push for all the changes you recommend in your contribution? How can partnerships with other stakeholders, such as the government itself, private sector, civil society and the UN provide teachers with the necessary capacity to promote change?

Salma Zaki Nashef • Assistant Professor at The Private University for Medical Sciences from Jordan

Dear SYEDA HAMID

I agree with what is written in your document especially what is concerned with teachers.

Salma Zaki Nashef • Assistant Professor at The Private University for Medical Sciences from Jordan

Hi all..

As concern the 3rd question:

What steps are necessary to ensure that all stakeholders, including the government, private sector and civil society can readily exchange information and experiences? How can "peer exchange" be established and nurtured?

1. It is necessary to have a well experienced & educated coordinator between the three parties, the government, private sector and civil society in order to plan , sum & facilitate implementation, this may be a huge work & may need assistance from other persons, but it is necessary in my opinion.

2. Arrange meetings with each one of the three parties on different dimensions to ensure dessimination of information & in return collect the desired & suitable ones.

3. Choose representatives from each 3 parties according to the meetings conducted.

4. Conduct meeting between him & the representatives to discuss different necessary  issues.

5. Write recommendations according to step number 4.

6. Distribute the required recomendations to the required part of the three in order for implementation.

7. Perform different meetings with each part for follow up, feedback & results

8. Evaluate what is done & what it doesn't .

9. Remedy according to diagnose took part in 8.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for you contribution to our e-discussion. In your opinion, what needs to be done to ensure that all stakeholders will engage in the partnership process you have suggested in your post?

Salma Zaki Nashef • Assistant Professor at The Private University for Medical Sciences from Jordan

Dear E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil,

This is a huge & complex task because it is not related only to one part , person or element, it combines a lot of variables but the most important thing to ensure the engagement in the partnership process is to be careful about the kind & quality of persons to be chosen, they must be responsible, motivated, hard worker, honest , faithful & srerious .

 

On the other hand there should be continious supervision , guidance, feed back & follow up through different means like meetings, discussions, questionairs & observation which should lead to  immediate correction before going to the next step of work.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. Providing training and feedback to all stakeholders involved in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda will certainly contribute to the achievement of the SDGs.

Salma Zaki Nashef • Assistant Professor at The Private University for Medical Sciences from Jordan

Question:3

Peer exchange can be nurtured by trusting them & providing them with different kinds of reinforcement & motives

Karol Arámbula • from Mexico

How can the SDGs be effectively mainstreamed into relevant national sustainable development policies and programmes, while preserving countries' policy space to pursue national priorities? How can the UN development system best support this?

Through the establishment of inclusive partnerships for the continuing revision of national and local targets and goals in the short term. These inclusive partnershops should include all stakeholders in sustainable development, particularly Civil Society Organizations. Mechanisms should be adopted at the national level to encourage not only stakeholders' participation, but also citizen participation in revision and follow-up processes. The momentum built upon the construction of the 2030 Agenda since 2012, must continue with the same energy and involvement of all social actors at all levels. The United Nations can serve as the ideal process to continue with this process in the short term. Communication efforts will be key for the success of this process. 

What are key areas for making progress on and building national and sub-national capacities for sustainable development, and how do they differ across country contexts (e.g. least developed countries, middle income countries, high-income countries, countries in situations of fragility etc.)? When and how can partnerships effectively contribute to capacity building and sustainable development?

Member States of the United Nations should promote local and national capacity-building strategies at all levels. This will be the best way to ensure state and local efectiveness becomes a real enabler of community involvement in the 2030 Agenda, as well as a stimulating tool for local participation in public affairs and decision-making processes. The key areas for this are the creation of efficient, effective, transparent and accountable mechanisms at the local and national levels for the adequate follow-up process of the agenda, responding to everyone's needs and development priorities. 

What steps are necessary to ensure that all stakeholders, including the government, private sector and civil society can readily exchange information and experiences? How can "peer exchange" be established and nurtured?

Ownership, transparency and trust in the policy-making process of the 2030 Agenda should be the first key effort for the involvement of all stakeholders. Particular attentio to inequality and marginalized communities is fundamental for the overall advancement of the agenda. We must be able to communicate the 2030 Agenda more efficiently to all social national actores, especially to local stakeholders and individuals. Local governments play a key role in linking stakeholders in regional development and the exchange of best practices, without their involvement the agenda will not have the expected impact. In this agenda, all stakeholders should have a defined and active role, placing emphasis in ownership and engagement, making them all feel part of the implementation and revision process. 

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. In your post, you suggest that "Mechanisms should be adopted at the national level to encourage not only stakeholders' participation, but also citizen participation in revision and follow-up processes." Can you give us examples of such mechanisms and how they can be best implemented? Also, what do you think should be done to actively engage "inequality and marginalized communities" in the partnerships for development?

Regarding your comment of “communicating the 2030 Agenda more efficiently to all stakeholders", I recommend checking Mohammed Eid's post on advocacy:

Mohammed Eid Operations Coordinator from Palestine (State of) *yesterday at 05.15 pm

Speaking about making progress on and building national and sub-national capacities for sustainable development, and how can partnerships effectively contribute to capacity building and sustainable development;  

I think its very critical to take into consideration the advocacy issue, less people are involved due to the lack of proper advocacy. Speaking of one the UN agencies where I work, at the UNRWA many of the programs are doomed to fail due to lack of involvement. Only few people are aware of the goals and aims, and I can certainly confirm that many of the stakeholders has not heard of 2030 agenda and its sub-goals We need to put the people in the driving seat, we need to involve them more often in a way that will inform them more often about the main goals and the sustainability plans.  Programs should not be cut out of the context, and help should be sought from the media to keep the people informed about the plans, the agenda and the progress made so far.

Fwanshishak Daniel • from Nigeria

“Education’s Role in Reducing Child Brides” (Goal 4 & 5)

 

So much is taken for granted when education is considered an end in itself and as a solution to life issues; in this particular instance to the problem of early marriage and child brides. There is so much “evidence” and so much “data” supporting the correlation between more education for girls and improve social standing and empowerment for girls. Education is imbued with the almost magical power to “lower maternal mortality, improve children's health, lower birth rates and help women to find jobs – which in turn boosts economies”. And whenever such data and research are quoted, the experts are careful not to mention the rising rates of unemployment, underemployment and the gross inequalities and corruption that belie the situation of girls and women in at risk countries like Nigeria.

 

It is important that all stakeholders acknowledge the role of poverty and absence of opportunities especially in education, agriculture and other economic activities and link these issues to the unfortunate perpetuation of early marriages and child brides. The crisis we face is not only in the education sector. These girls, their parents, their husbands and their communities and our country are all victims and there is the need to work towards ending the economic waste and continued infringement of their rights and humanity.

 

Other sectors of the economy and the society will have to prioritise education to girls as crucial to their respective endeavours and part of their sustainability plans. Lack of education is not just hurting girls; but because agriculture, health systems, small scale businesses, justice and government systems, and education all fail, girls are mostly the opportunity cost in the short term. In the long run, their lack of education is what is responsible for such huge system failures. So it is in the end a self-reinforcing circle.

 

Our society should refocus attention on education of girls and for all, not as an end in itself, but as a system-support and strengthening process focusing on investing in agriculture, healthcare delivery, business and economic activities and justice and governance. These sectors have to invest in education not in the current traditional sense of the word like building more classes and toilets or in training more teachers or even in school feeding schemes – but in opening up more opportunities for employment and investment to clear the existing glut in the labour market and give actual material value to education.

 

Expanding opportunities in employment and investments will directly benefit education and the society in many ways including in ensuring that previous investments in education do not go to waste and also strengthening and increasing the yield and productivity of the economy. Doing this will guarantee more revenue and resources for further investment in education and improve on the quality of life and health of individuals and their community. It could also deescalate tension and eliminate conflicts and war and provide opportunity to measure the quality of education and suggest ways/areas where there is need for improvement.

 

Other benefits would include the narrowing of the gender gap in communities and other traditional forms of inequality. It will further lead to a significant reduction in diseases and improvement in health care delivery. It will enhance international peace and strengthen capacity for global partnerships and make a new world possible.

 

Making this happen does not require extra investment in education, at least, nothing more than what is currently being poured into desperate education interventions that do not seem to be yielding corresponding results. There will simply be the need to form a coalition of stakeholders in education to look into a new areas of expanding employment and business opportunities as direct investment in expanding education delivery. For example, current businesses and philanthropic investment in education can be channelled towards providing remedial training and skill acquisition for job placements (for women).

 

Community health interventions should invest more in training local women and equipping them with skills and knowledge to manage community health issues rather than recycling existing manpower in the civil service and who do not reside in the intervention communities.

 

Food and other relief interventions in conflict areas must explore ways of establishing viable agricultural and economic opportunities in conflict areas and train (refugees/displace persons) beneficiaries to work in these areas as part of their sustainability and resettlement plans.

 

Companies and multinational corporations can pay their taxes in “employment slots” for women and other disadvantage groups; this will increase their production and open up opportunities down the chain for education.

 

Agro allied companies that import raw materials for local production can sign contracts with local/rural communities and farmer cooperatives to produce and provide the needed raw materials. The additional revenue local farmers get from these opportunities can be used to provide education for their children, support their families, reduce over dependence on government interventions; it can also be taxed by the government to support the education sector. The industries and the government will also save a lot on foreign exchange and importation.

 

Government education departments and agencies, international development partners and other stakeholders interested in education can work with other economic sectors to focus on investment opportunities and employment drives as central to the goal of providing education which is a strategy for eradicating early marriages and child brides, as well as for conflict management, improving community health care and ensuring justice and good governance.

 

For education and literacy to succeed and make sense to the already disadvantaged groups in the society, it must be seen to be directly related to economic empowerment, justice and equity. Once this is done, societies will embrace education not as an end in itself but as a way to promoting the choice of good values as well as for the opportunities it provides them.

 

This will continue to improve until people are educated enough to want education and literacy as an end in themselves and respect for the rights of girls and women become the norm. Unless clear opportunities are made available, child marriage and child-brides might just continue to grow.

 

Fwanshishak Daniel, Abuja

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. You gave some examples on how civil society, governments and the private sector could act to provide jobs and education. What do you believe can be done for all stakeholders to engage in those partnerships?

Peter Head (not verified)

My Charity The Ecological Sequestration Trust rently facilitated, with UNSDSN,2 high level workshops at Bellagio Rockefeller Centre to create a Roadmap 2030, an action plan for a smart partnership between national governments, municipal governments, private sector and communities to implement the SDG's and Sendai risk framework and outcome of COP21. This takes the form of a background description and then an action plan for collbaoratve action drawn from recommendations of around 80 current studies. It is effectively an integrated action plan for bringing public-private finance together for implementation.

The approach is an open-source online resource for everyone to use and if you could help facilitate comments we will update it over the next 2 months. It is designed also to help the Habitat III process.

The approach in the Roadmap will be demonstrated in Ghana and in the city of Accra,starting this year ,and Ghana is willing to help others to follow.Here is the link to the Roadmap 2030 which includes a downloadable PDF. 

http://ecosequestrust.org/roadmap-for-habitat-iii/

We are open to supporting demonstration in other countries and the hope is that each country will get a regional demonstrator going by 2018 and create a scaling RIIF fund for all regions of each country to be investing in SDG's to meet the 2030 deadline.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your contribution. Could you tell us how your organization is preparing to engage stakeholders in sharing infromation and experiences using the online platform you created?

Patrick MC CARTHY • Programme Specialist at UNDP

Thank you for the opportunity to contirbute to this discussion.  

I would just like to make one small technical point regarding a key resource that is available to help suport national implementation of SDG Targets 16.1 (violence reduction) and 16.4 (reduce illicit arms flows).  

UNDP and UNODA (Office for Disarmament Affairs) lead the UN system in developing International Small Arms Control Standards (ISACS) - <www.smallarmsstandards.org&gt;.  Already 13 international standards are available providing practical guidance on such issues as small arms stockpile management, marking and recordkeeping, collection and destruction, etc.  Application of these standards—which are achievable by all States, including those affected by conflict—help to strengthen national controls over the full lifecycle of small arms and prevent their leakage into the illict market where they can be used to fuel further violence and conflict.  

UNDP and a number of other UN agencies and missions (e.g. UNODA, UNODC, DPKO/UNMAS, UNSOM, CTED, UNIDIR, etc.) are already using ISACS to good effect in more than 80 countries to help reduce illicit arms flows in accordance with SDG 16.4.  This is a key enabling tool that should be promoted in the context of achieving this target.  UNDP manages the ISACS Inter-Agency Support Unit that provides assistance across the UN system on the use of these standards - support@smallarmsstandards.org | www.smallarmsstandards.org 

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment on the role of international standards to achieve the SDGs.

Rita Luthra

Please Remove my e-mail from your mailing list

 

Thank you

 

 

Rita Luthra, MD

President

Women's Health and Education Center (WHEC)

NGO in Special Consultative Status with Economic and Social Council of the United Nations

Editor-in-Chief of e-Health Publication

http://www.WomensHealthSection.com

 

From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org] Sent: Sunday, March 27, 2016 9:19 PMTo: rita@womenshealthsection.comSubject: [World We Want 2030] E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil commented on the Discussion "National Implementation"

 

Francesca (not verified)

Dear all,

 

First of all I appreciate this e-discussion, a unique opportunity to the broader development community to provide critical policy guidance and recommendations for the implementation of the 2030 Agenda. It definitely leads the way to result-oriented actions.

 

The Foundation I work for has a focus on disability–inclusive development, extending its field of action beyond Italian boundaries, so we are particularly committed to implementing the disability-inclusive SDGs.

In this direction we promote Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR) projects at grassroots level in communities, promotes and strengthens local Disabled People Organisations (DPOs) in rural and isolated areas abroad, and monitors the implementation of CRPD at field level by collaborating with national CRPD monitoring systems.

 

Nationally, we consider the two listed below the most efficient tools so far to land the global agenda at national and sub-national level :

- The International Conference Including Disability “Development Cooperation: Experiences of collaboration between Governments, NGOs and DPOs” promoted by UNDESA

- The interaction with the National Observatory on the condition of persons with disabilities

 

So we are looking forward to and committed to create more best practice exchange occasions in a Sectoral and Cross-Institutional perspective.

 

We encourage the national UN office to replicate this e-discussion at a national level and persevere in its challenging approach/facilitator role to collect data and publish reports and statistics.

 

An analysis of the current national development strategies is the good foundation to implement the 2030 Agenda nationally!

 

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. Can you tell us how your organization engages stakeholders in developing and implementing your Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR) projects?

Fiona Bradley

Regarding Question 1 and 2, At IFLA, we are encouraging our members in each country to take up conversations with policy makers and ensure that libraries, as institutions providing access to information and ICTs, are represented in National Development Plans. We created a Toolkit: http://www.ifla.org/publications/node/10156 to help libraries and library associations to understand the 2030 Agenda and bring themselves into a relevant conversation with their national agencies. Libraries are institutions that can bring significant capacity to the realisation of the 2030 Agenda in a national and international context.

Libraries provide an established, trusted network of local institutions that effectively reach new and marginalised populations. When libraries are included in development plans and as partners to support delivery at the national and local level, they can make a valuable contribution to reaching the aims of the 2030 Agenda.

It is important to take advantage of existing infrastructure to realise the 2030 Agenda. Worldwide, 320,000 public libraries and more than a million parliamentary, national, university, science and research, school, and special libraries ensure that information and the skills to use it are available to everyone – making them critical institutions for all in the digital age. Libraries provide information and communication technology (ICT) infrastructure, help people develop the capacity to effectively use information, and preserve information to ensure ongoing access for future generations.

IFLA and its members welcome the opportunities for civil society to participate in shaping and implementing the UN 2030 Agenda at all levels. Libraries are proven, cost-effective partners for advancing development priorities, and are already making an active contribution to development planning in many countries. Many countries have designated libraries as UN depositories, making them an important venue for information about the UN and the SDGs. Through a diverse range of programmes and services tailored to the needs of their community, libraries are already supporting progress toward the SDGs.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. Libraries can have a catalyst role in what regards sharing information and engaging stakeholders, which can help advance the 2030 Agenda.

Adinda Ceelen

Herewith the multi-stakeholder Task Team on CSO Development Effectiveness and Enabling Environment wishes to offer suggestions on steps to ensure stakeholders can readily exchange information and experience. The 2030 Agenda is grounded in the principle of partnership, which stems from a recognition that governments cannot be the sole agent for development. Indeed individual institutional efforts and joint collaboration of various stakeholders – each with their own resources and comparative advantages – are needed to tackle the complex challenges the 2030 Agenda seeks to address. Meaningful and effective stakeholder engagement that includes exchange of information and sharing of experiences is crucial to realize the SDGs. This can be operationalized through the establishment of institutionalized multi-stakeholder spaces for dialogue where the voices of multiple stakeholders can be heard in the design, implementation and review of national-level development policies and plans for the 2030 Agenda.

Another way to facilitate stakeholders exchanging information and experience is through multi-stakeholder engagement in follow-up and review. The Secretary General calls for such a multi-stakeholder approach in his Report on Follow-up and Review. In terms of the ‘how to’ of conducting multi-stakeholder follow-up and review, the Task Team recommends looking at the monitoring framework of the Global Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation (GPEDC). This monitoring framework can be used as a source of inspiration in light of its emphasis on multi-stakeholder engagement and mutual accountability across stakeholders in reviewing progress at country-level. Like follow-up and review for the 2030 Agenda, the GPEDC’s biennial monitoring exercise is voluntary and state-led. As such, it offers a complement to follow-up and review of the 2030 Agenda that would not create an additional reporting burden on the many participating GPEDC governments.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. Regarding partnerships for development, the UN will hold the 2016 ECOSOC Partnership Forum “From commitments to results: Leveraging partnerships for the 2030 Agenda”, which wil be held at the United Nations Headquarters on March 31st, 2016. For more information on the 2016 ECOSOC Partnership Forum, please check:https://www.un.org/ecosoc/en/node/355639.

Rita Luthra

Please Remove my e-mail from your mailing list

 

Thank you

 

 

Rita Luthra, MD

President

Women's Health and Education Center (WHEC)

NGO in Special Consultative Status with Economic and Social Council of the United Nations

Editor-in-Chief of e-Health Publication

http://www.WomensHealthSection.com

 

From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org] Sent: Sunday, March 27, 2016 11:21 PMTo: rita@womenshealthsection.comSubject: [World We Want 2030] E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil commented on the Discussion "National Implementation"

 

Gemma AGUADO

Lessons learned from the MDGs showed that no development Agenda can be successful without an effective localization; this involves concrete mechanisms, tools, innovations, platforms and processes to effectively translate the development agenda into results at the local level. There is also increasing recognition of the importance of LRGs’ involvement in international development cooperation, which is instrumental in achieving development results, democratizing development effectiveness and promoting inclusive ownership. During the UNDG-mandated Dialogues on Localizing the Post-2015 agenda, promoted by UNDP, UN Habitat and the Global Taskforce of Local and Regional Governments in 2014, numerous governments and actors expressed the need to be informed and equipped with concrete strategies and mechanisms to translate the key outputs of the process into substantial development plans.

Localization refers to the process of defining, implementing and monitoring strategies and policies at the local level for achieving global, national and subnational sustainable development goals and targets. It should not be seen as a translation of global policies within local contexts, but rather as a way of establishing a coherent continuum, and as a process based on the empowerment of local stakeholders, through a territorial approach aimed at making sustainable development more responsive and therefore relevant to local needs, aspirations and lives. 

Upon the request of the Dialogues participant, and building on the forged alliance, the three partners (UNDP, UN Habitat and the GTF) have started working on the elaboration of Toolkit for localizing the SDGs, aimed at supporting local and regional governments (LRGs) and other local governance stakeholders in i) raising awareness and advocating for the active role of local actors in the SDGs’ localization (advocacy); and ii) making their decisions coherent with the SDGs’ attainment in support of a better quality of life for all citizens (implementation). The toolkit will therefore offer a set of instruments and mechanisms that can facilitate the localization of the SDGs; it will have a consistent but flexible approach to be adaptable to different contexts, including peacebuilding. It will be built upon already-existing local development and local governance (LDLG) practices and tools, and will look at crucial areas that need to be addressed in order to successfully implement the Agenda at local level, such as the integration of the three pillars of sustainable development within local development systems, inclusiveness, multilevel governance, monitoring and accountability, and the role of territorial partnerships, among others. The stocktaking exercise to elaborate the Toolkit has already started, with a wide number of partners - such as LRGs and associations thereof, CSO, International Organizations, Research and Academic Institutions, and other LDLG practitioners and experts- contributing through stakeholder workshops and discussions. The process is open to all actors interested in participating; an online platform will be launched soon, to provide the opportunity to interact with other peers about the challenges related to the SDGs’ localization.

 

The toolkit is also fully in line with the overall UNDG MAPs strategy, which aims at providing effective and coherent implementation support through mainstreaming (landing the new agenda at the national and local levels), acceleration (targeting national resources at priority areas) and policy support (making UN development system skills and expertise available). The MAPS provides a shared resource for the UNCT’s substantive engagement with governments and partners on the SDGs, paying special attention to the crosscutting elements of partnerships, data and accountability.

Greetings from the ART Initiative - UNDP Brussels

Gemma Aguado

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. The development of the "Toolkit for localizing the SDGs" shows us the importance of localization for ownership of the 2030 Agenda at the national and sub-national levels and also sets a good example on how the UN can foster the localization of the SDGs.

GIULIANA VACA (not verified)

Para alcanzar como meta el desarrollo sostenible sin importar la capacidad económica de los gobiernos de los distintos países alrededor del mundo, es fundamental empoderar a los jóvenes en cuanto al desarrollo de proyectos.

Es importante que los jóvenes profesionales de las muchas carreras que se ofrecen a nivel unversitario desarrollen proyectos sociales que involucren a jóvenes menos afortunados en ideas que colaboren a cambiar la visión económica hacia el desarrollo de fuentes alternativas de empleo, que sean viables y sostenibles a nivel económico, social y ambiental.

Los proyectos que se realicen deberán ser dirigidos a trabajar en los tres niveles antes mencionados de manera simultánea y sería un éxito si se cuenta con el apoyo de municipalidades y otros niveles de gobierno o de organizaciones nacionales e internacionales.

Por ejemplo: Un grupo de jóvenes universitarios, asesorados por sus maestros podrían desarrollar un proyecto de reciclaje de materiales en una comunidad, para ello buscarán establecer conexiones entre empresas y jóvenes de la comunidad que se empleen en el proyecto y que logren establecer comercio con las empresas; con ello, se trabaja en el ámbito del desarrollo social pues se emplea a jóvenes de la comunidad, se desenvuelve el aspecto ecónómico pues se emprende comercio entre empresas y comunidad; y en lo ambiental, pues se gestionan los residuos de mejor manera. 

Cada región del mundo tiene una realidad distinta y problemas enfocados a diferentes sectores, y de acuerdo a dichas realidades los proyectos deben enfocarse en cubrir las necesidades existentes y de esta manera unir la brecha entre los ámbitos socioeconómico y ambiental. 

Apoyo a las opiniones del resto de participantes en el foro en cuanto que el sistema económico mundial limita la igualdad de los sectores de la población mundial y pienso que las estrategias que se den en la Agenda 30 deben ser acciones plasmadas y no solamente palabras sueltas.

E-discussion Facilitator

Gracias por su participación. Usted ha resaltado la importancia de capacitar a los jóvenes para que elaboren proyectos sociales que cambien la visión económica hacia un desarrollo sostenible. En su opinión, qué es necesario hacer para que los jóvenes se involucren en la discusión de la Agenda 2030 en sus países, además de ofrecerles capacitación? Qué herramientas/estrategias utilizar para que la juventud se interese por el tema y comparta experiencias con los demás stakeholders del proceso de desarrollo?

Sylvia Beales • Head of Strategic Alliances at HelpAge International

 

Life expectancy on the rise everywhere. Today’s youth is fast becoming tomorrow’s age bulge. Two thirds of older people live in developing countries; almost half of  people over 65 will also have disabilities.

The Stakeholder Group on Ageing believes that implementation Agenda 2030 in full requires political will to drive national policies and investment to highlight and tackle the social and economic impact of ageing and clear commitment to end the high levels of poverty, exclusion and social isolation in older age.[[1]]

National measures to deal with these challenges include opening up aaccountability and governance mechanisms to be inclusive of all people, including older people. Participation is essential as are opportunities for voice, opinion and inclusion in implementation mechanisms’. Discrimination and invisibility based on age, gender and ability as well as on other factors has no place in national programmers to implement the SDGs.  It is at the national level that full implementation must be judged. Reports from governments must demonstrate that they are moving away from averages to show how specific cohorts are being reached with programmes and budgets to match.  Specific measures will need to be adopted to show how all people across the life course are being heard, reached, who are missing, and who are invisible and unheard. 

Improved data collection and analysis nationally are the key to progress. Investment in capacity and systems is essential to strengthen the statistical and reporting systems to disaggregate data by age, gender and disability. Current understanding of what disaggregating data by age means is inconsistent and insufficient. As the Stakeholder Group on Ageing has noted [[2]] critical data is missing to measure progress on a range of issues of fundamental importance to those who are ageing, many of whom have disabilities. Progress requires improved data collection and analysis on age and disability that includes separate age cohorts from 60 years and above.

In many national fora the experience of older women and men is that they can be amongst the most marginalized people in consultations and negotiations. Yet older persons and persons with disabilities must be seen as a valuable asset, rather than a burden on resources. All people regardless of age, gender ability and so on have a voice and opinion. Together with others their  contributions to the achievement of the goals should be assessed and measured. The Stakeholder Group on Ageing supports the articulation of concerns about age and the  inclusion of older people in the process, and also joins hands with others who are trying to reach those hardest  to get to. We believe it is essential to articulate the connections and intersect between different age groups, persons with disabilities, genders and ethnicities.

Experience of working with others on inclusion include participatory research with older persons and persons with disabilities to assess their situation in localities in Bangladesh and Tanzania, and shared policy recommendations.  Helpage experience of listening to and acting on recommendations of Older Peoples Associations in Tanzania and Myanmar brings better health and wellbeing across generations.  

Key recommendations :  

  • Visible, substantial and sustainable increase in funding and policies aimed at older people and people with disabilities to “leave no one behind”.
  • Global support to effective, efficient and coherent funding modalities for the design, implementation and extension of social protection floors and Universal health coverage to support existing mechanisms and based on country-led practices.
  • Specifically include and support contributions from older people and people with disabilities in budgets, plans, training and response mechanisms for humanitarian, national disaster management and climate policies.
  • Ensure transparency and accountability of member states to their older citizens and persons with disabilities to guarantee the equitable environment for people of all ages and abilities to be active contributors and participants in development.
  • Substantially and visibly increase investment and capacity to strengthen global and national statistical and reporting systems to disaggregate data by age, gender and disability.

 

Roseline Kihumba - Interview #DataForumKE: https://t.co/S1DDdv9tCL via @YouTube (https://twitter.com/PASGR_/status/702128359543848960)

 

 

 

[[1]] Professor Nora Groce, Disability and ageing, in Facing the Facts, Age International 2015

[[2]] Stakeholder Group on Ageing March 2015 statement on indicators 

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. You have highlighted the need for the elderly and people with disabilities to be engaged in policy elaboration and monitoringin order for national development plans to reflect the Agenda 2030 in full. You have also emphasized the importance of "improved data collection and analysis nationally... to progress", thus advocating for "investment in capacity and systems... to strengthen the statistical and reporting systems to disaggregate data by age, gender and disability".

In your experience, what needs to be done to ensure the participation of the elderly and of people with disabilities in mainstreaming the SDGs into national policy?

E-discussion Facilitator

Global online discussion for delivering results toward the SDGs22 March 2016, New York

A global online discussion was launched on 29 February and runs through 25 March as part of the 2016 session of the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC). The co-organisers of this e-Discussion—UN DESA and UNDP—hope to engage users from around the world on their ideas and recommendations for implementing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, which includes the sustainable development goals (SDGs). This is in line with the 2016 theme of the Council, “Implementing the post-2015 development agenda: moving from commitments to results”.

The e-Discussion provides a unique opportunity for the wider development community to formulate critical policy messages and recommendations for ECOSOC, engaging experts and others working “on the ground” and in a wide variety of contexts with the discussions taking place in New York. The contributions will inform the report of the Secretary-General on the ECOSOC theme in support of the Council’s deliberations on the theme, leading to the adoption of the Council’s 2016 Ministerial Declaration in July.

Having just completed its third week, the e-Discussion has generated over 300 comments. A majority of the participants are from the Americas, followed closely by Europe, Africa and Asia. Participants have provided concrete examples and suggestions on a wide range of issues related to implementing the 2030 Agenda.

Regarding the need for inclusive development, Lal Manavado, global health expert, highlighted the dangers of “remote-controlled” (top-down) development plans that do not take into consideration the impact of large-scale development projects on indigenous populations and environments. He cited the negative impact on the livelihoods of nomads and environmental stability as the result of a large-scale damming project in Central Asia. The damming project was intended to supply water for other development purposes, which shines light on the need for States to take into account the three dimensions of sustainable development when making policy choices.

On the need to mainstream the SDGs at the national level, Moa Westman, Regional Programme Adviser UNDP-UNEP Poverty-Environment Initiative Africa from Kenya highlighted the importance of building capacities and ensuring inter-sectoral and –ministerial coordination within government.

The contributor stated that the case of Mozambique demonstrated “the catalytic role that the UN and other development partners can play in stimulating integrated approaches by providing evidence and supporting the development of mainstreaming tools, thereby grounding poverty-environment mainstreaming in practice.” This will be essential for successful implementation of the 2030 Agenda at the national level.

In terms of critical elements for follow-up and review, Adrian Hassler, Danish Institute for Human Rights, emphasized that the “backbone of the follow-up and review architecture” would be inclusiveness and transparency at the national level. National and local capacities and processes need to internalize inclusiveness and transparency in how progress is measured and monitored. At the global level, follow-up and review can support these efforts by establishing norms and guidance on measuring progress and bringing countries together to exchange experiences and knowledge on their sustainable development efforts.

There is still opportunity to contribute to the ongoing discussion and have your voice heard as part of the 2016 session of ECOSOC. You can join by visiting https://www.unteamworks.org/ECOSOC-2016

Source: https://www.un.org/development/desa/en/news/ecosoc/e-discussion-on-sdgs…

Dr. Abdulghany Mohamed • from Canada

On Youth Leadership and Engagement

Dear Moderators,

First of all, thank you very much for the summaries and remarks.

I would like to build on your contributions and participants’ inputs by focusing on and re-emphasizing the need to meaningfully engage the youth in implementing the SDGs. As an educator, an ex-youth myself, (i.e., age-wise! although still young at heart) and development practitioner I believe in the positive role youth can play and have indeed contributed to development endeavours. Specifically, I would like to suggest that the UN system (among others) endeavour to impress upon national leaders to initiate/institute regular (e.g, semi-annually) broad-based and widely/geographically distributed/organized youth leadership training/coaching (at local national and international levels) in planning, implementing and evaluating SDG-centred projects/programs as well as in ethics, community outreach, coalition building and teamwork, entrepreneurship, creativity and innovation (both social and economic/business).

Moreover, I believe that support for such an endeavour (by national and local leaders/organizations coupled with intellectual/moral/financial resources (e.g., from the bodiew such as ILO, World Bank, WHO, UNICEF, UNESCO, UNDP, EU, etc) would go a long way in ensuring that our youth are productively/fruitfully engaged – presently and in the future to come.

Thanks again to all for you invaluable contributions.

Sincerely,

Dr. Abdulghany Mohamed

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your contribution. Several of the SDGs targets address children and youth, recognized as one of the main channels through which broad participation would be facilitated in UN activities related to sustainable development. For more information on stakeholders engagement, please check the SDGs website: https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/majorgroups.

Gabi Spitz (not verified)

Dear Pedro, thank you for moderating this discussion on the national implementation of the SDGs. It is a very rich discussion in which many interesting points have been raised. As you request concrete experiences and examples, I would like to share some from the Netherlands. At Kaleidos Research, research institute for global issues, we have just published two studies on the implementation of the SDGs in the Netherlands. The first explores the role of Dutch CSOs and the second focuses on the localization of the SDGs through local governments. A third study, on the role of the private sector (in particular SMEs) will be published in April.

 

Below are some of the most relevant findings on the role of Dutch CSOs and Local Governments in relation to the nationale implementation of the SDGs. I hope they can be useful for others working on the inclusive national implementation of the Agenda2030.

 

Current state of implementation

Similar to most other European countries, there is no formal implementation framework or a ‘national strategy’ in the Netherlands yet. Efforts have been put in place to take stock of existing frameworks and policies that could be aligned with the SDGs. A clear example is the analyses of policy targets in the field of the environmental SDGs, executed by PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency. Netherlands Statistics (CBS) has explored how the new agenda could be monitored and plays an active role in the international process of developing indicators for the SDGs.

At the national level, a SDG ambassador and SDG coordinator were appointed, as well as focal points within various ministries in order to stimulate involvement of various ministries and to increase policy coherence. In this exploratory phase the Ministry of Foreign Affairs has been leading.

 

The roles of CSOs and Local governments

The research finds that both CSOs and LAs see several roles for themselves. Local governments mostly expect to contribute to the implementation of the SDGs as facilitator, by leading by example (in own policies and abroad) and as communicator (towards specific relevant groups, not the community at large). CSOs mostly see their role as watchdogs, carrying out relevant activities abroad and working in partnership with other stakeholders.

 

It should be mentioned, that both the national government as well as local governments and CSOs do not seem to embrace a top down approach that imposes a centralized strategy onto stakeholders. This reflect general developments in the Netherlands, where the national government is pulling back in many (social) areas; leaving more to civil society actors. As the SDGs are an agenda for all stakeholders, it seems that relevant stakeholders are now also getting quite some room to take incentive on the SDGs.

 

Nevertheless, in the exploration of their own roles, CSOs and LAs do voice the need for more clarity about the role of the government. Not only because they feel that the Netherlands should follow-up on their commitments to the Agenda2030, but also to determine their own roles in the implementation process. Furthermore, many stakeholders indicate that the SDGs are still mostly an agenda of the development sector and that, for the success of the SDGs, it will be crucial to also get the environmental sector on board. Other challenges that both CSOs and local governments face is a lack of funds for activities on the SDGs. The research also shows that leadership on the agenda from the national government as well as EU institutions, is needed to strengthen local support and legitimacy for the implementation of the SDGs. 

 

Good examples

In the Netherlands, several initiatives have been set up in which CSOs, local governments and/or the private sector are engaged. These include the Global Goals Charter; a multi-stakeholder initiative which was signed by over 70 Dutch organizations. The charter was already set up before the adoption of the SDGs and aims at developing and strengthening multi stakeholder partnerships for specific SDGs. A partnership on health has been set up dedicated to contribute towards SDG 3. Another partnership that is being developed focuses on Human Cities: SDG 11.

 

A broad consortium of public and private parties is also working together to develop a Dutch global goals website that brings together all Dutch initiatives and news on the SDGs. (Participating organisations include the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, multi-media platform OneWorld, the international cooperation agency of the Association of Netherlands Municipalities (VNG International), Partos, the Global Goals Charter, Earth Charter Nederland, Global Compact Netherlands and employer’s organisation VNO/NCW.) Besides a website, they are also organizing a series of public debates to raise awareness on the SDGs.

 

There are some other activities in which especially CSOs and LAs and their umbrella organisations Partos (for CSOs) and VNG international (for LAs) are taking the lead, which might encourage the engagement of other actors as well. Examples are the CSO-initiative “Ready for Change “(that focuses on coherence and the SDGs) and the global goals municipality campaign (an initiative of VNG International, the International Cooperation Agency of the Association of Netherlands Municipalities).

More information can be found in the attached discussion papers. 

E-discussion Facilitator

Thnak you for your contribution to our e-discussion. Your practical examples are certainly most welcomed and will surely enrich the e-discussion report that will be sent to UNDP and DESA.

Chris Murgatroyd

The experience of support to a small group of Member States on an initiative to pilot governance in the context of the SDGs is instructive on questions of national implementation.

 

During 2014 and 2015 the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) worked with five Member States – Albania, Indonesia, Rwanda, Tunisia and, at a later stage, the United Kingdom (UK) – to consider approaches to implement and monitor relevant national governance-related goals, with associated targets and indicators. The Pilot Initiative aimed to enhance the readiness of participating countries to integrate such goals and related targets into national planning processes, as well as to operationalise their delivery after the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in September 2015.

 

The Pilot Initiative was also expected to facilitate cooperation and exchange of knowledge and experience between countries and assist in identifying champions in each region, whose early start on this type of work could serve as an example for other countries to follow. To this end, global workshops were convened in Tunis in April 2015, and in Kigali in February 2016, to review challenges and lessons learned from the five countries undertaking the initiative, and to consider the transition from piloting to implementation, as well as putting activities into the context of the overall MAPS framework for implementation of the SDGs, and emerging work on localisation.

 

Emerging lessons and trends from the pilot countries’ experience include:

 

Collecting, identifying and prioritising indicators: Experience from pilot countries suggests that to get a full picture of governance-related issues in a country, several types of indicators – including administrative records and survey-based data, at both the input and outcome levels – should be used to cross-check results towards a single target.

 

Localising at the sub-national level, vis-à-vis universalisation and harmonisation of indicators: Experience from the pilot countries confirms the importance of balancing specific and contextualised indicators that capture the richness of information at the national and sub-national levels, whilst still being internationally comparable and capable of being harmonised across countries.

 

Reconciling an emphasis on indicators with appropriate policies and processes that lead to change: The need to link policies with practice and service delivery was identified by some pilot countries. Countries have also organized themselves in very different ways at the institutional level to address this interface, and begin the process of implementing Goal 16.

 

Working in partnership with multiple stakeholders: Experience from the pilot countries suggests that partnerships at all levels – through consultation in local communities, at the regional and provincial level, across government, and between government actors and stakeholders in oversight bodies, in civil society and the private sector – will be essential for progress on Goal 16.

 

In addition to highlighting the importance of planning, which will be a key theme of the MAPS approach, the Pilot work has also helped to emphasise that successful implementation of Goal 16 will be essential to ensuring subsequent progress on all other goals.

 

The Pilot work has also demonstrated the importance of initiatives to help localise Goal 16 targets, with regional and local Institutions, and further attention will be needed on this as part of SDG implementation.

 

Many thanks.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. Your description of the Pilot Initiative on implementing and monitoring relevant national governance-related goals certainly sets an example of how the UN development system can support the processes of mainstreaming the SDGs and implementing the 2030 Agenda at the national level.

Rita Luthra

Please remove my e-mail from your mailing list

 

Thank You

 

 

Rita Luthra, MD

President

Women's Health and Education Center (WHEC)

NGO in Special Consultative Status with Economic and Social Council of the United Nations

Editor-in-Chief of e-Health Publication

http://www.WomensHealthSection.com

 

From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org] Sent: Tuesday, March 29, 2016 1:37 PMTo: rita@womenshealthsection.comSubject: [World We Want 2030] E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil commented on the Discussion "National Implementation"

 

Henry Nnadozie Ekwuruke • Executive Director and Chief Consultant at Development Generation Africa International from Nigeria

How can women be partners in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda? DGAI asked on #IWD2016. We got reply from UN Women: Step it up for gender equality. On March 8, we installed six(6) women in Nigeria as Champions of Gender Equality and Women Empowerment. We also empowered the as "Torchbearers of #SDGs

May our works not be in vain. One of the awardees is a leader of women in Agriculture at National Root Crops Research Institute (NRCRI), Dr. (Mrs.) Nwanyieze Njoku - she want "consistency" with enabling rural women in agriculture get fertilizer and other suppliments." Another is Princess V. U. Anosike a woman champion in health at Ikwuano LGA, "women must be protected to give live births and provided with better opportunities." she said. Lady Cecilia Ekwuruke, my mother was also installed a "Champion." She will like local women traders protected and empowered to promote family futures" Another is Mrs. Chinwe V. Opara in ITF Awka, empowering young women through skill-based training and mentorship. Mrs. Temitope is the Operations Manager of GTBank in Umuahia, Nigeria. She is a 'little' afraid that gender equality is a dream too big. As a Young Champion, she accepted our challenge to mentor some three young girls going into entrepreneurship training supported by our organization as their "role model" We welcome the SDGs and celebrate with them! Prof. Mrs. Anozie encouraged women to speak up and thanked men for supporting them. She called 'silence' as death on the road to sustainability. Mrs. Ekwy Okezie-Ogbulafor is also our Torchbearer for sustainable development goals - they carry the lights we returned to Nigeria with from #UNGA70, she appreciates the work her bank - Heritage Bank is doing with young women!

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. Empowering women to perform as "SDGs champions" will certainly ensure sharing of knowledge, experiences and ideas so as to support the implementation of the 2030 Agenda at the national and sub-national levels.

Rita Luthra

Please remove my e-mail from your mailing list

 

Thank You

 

 

Rita Luthra, MD

President

Women's Health and Education Center (WHEC)

NGO in Special Consultative Status with Economic and Social Council of the United Nations

Editor-in-Chief of e-Health Publication

http://www.WomensHealthSection.com

 

From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org] Sent: Tuesday, March 29, 2016 1:37 PMTo: rita@womenshealthsection.comSubject: [World We Want 2030] E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil commented on the Discussion "National Implementation"

 

Yogesh Sharma (not verified)

Nothing and no policy can be implemented successfully if its not accepted whole heartedly by all the stake holders involved. The plicies shoud be made clear to all the authoriteis involded. They should also be shared with citizens.

The stakeholders should be assured safety, security and all help and assistance needed. The leaders and politicians need to set aside their personal differences and issues. National and Global progress should occupy the major place. 

The policies do not also see the success that they deserve and the hope that they are implemented is that they need to regularly audited and required changes should be made.

Lack of basic educationis one key issue people dont understand and accept the policies. Education to all is still only a dream. Basic education has to reach every single child on the planet.

Yogesh Sharma

President, Human Rights Sanrakshan Sansthaa

India

 

 

 

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. Political will is essential do policy coordinaton and implementation. Providing education that build people's capacity to understand the development agenda and to act on its behalf is also pivotal for the success of the SDGs.

Rita Luthra

Please remove my e-mail from your mailing list

 

Thank You

 

 

Rita Luthra, MD

President

Women's Health and Education Center (WHEC)

NGO in Special Consultative Status with Economic and Social Council of the United Nations

Editor-in-Chief of e-Health Publication

http://www.WomensHealthSection.com

 

From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org] Sent: Tuesday, March 29, 2016 1:37 PMTo: rita@womenshealthsection.comSubject: [World We Want 2030] E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil commented on the Discussion "National Implementation"

 

Patrick Kalas

Disclaimer: Personal opinion with reference to institutional approaches on effective capacity development approach of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

Smart and systemic capacity development for effective national implementation of the SDGs

Who will own and lead the national implementation process of the SDGs? In line with development effectiveness principles, the proposal is to take a smart and systemic human and institutional capacity development approach to enable effective and sustainable implementation of the SDGs. A smart and systemic capacity development approach interdependently strengthens individual capacities (e.g. knowledge, skills and competencies), organizational and institutional capacities (e.g. performance of organizations, cross-sectoral multi-stakeholder coordination mechanisms) as well as the systemic capacities (e.g. the enabling environment such as sound regulatory and policy frameworks, effective governance, institutional linkages, networks and enhanced political commitment and will).

Concretely, this means jointly with stakeholders (a) assessing capacity needs and priorities (b) define and design appropriate capacity development interventions and (c) define meaningful results and track progress. Practical tools, methods, approaches and experiences are available by a variety of development actors, including the FAO.

In sum, it will take “two-to-tango” for effective SDGs national level implementation- coherent and coordinated approach among development actors as well as capacities and commitment by developing countries. A smart and systematic capacity development approach in line with development effectiveness principles can make a tangible and meaningful contribution towards this aim. 

Many thanks for taking this into consideration. 

Kind regards

Patrick P. Kalas, Capacity Development Officer, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

 

 

 

 

 

Salma Zaki Nashef • Assistant Professor at The Private University for Medical Sciences from Jordan

Totally Agree

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank your for your comment. A systemic approach to capacity building can certainly foster the partnerships and prepare stakeholders for action on the 2030 Agenda.

Rita Luthra

Please remove my e-mail from your mailing list

 

Thank You

 

 

Rita Luthra, MD

President

Women's Health and Education Center (WHEC)

NGO in Special Consultative Status with Economic and Social Council of the United Nations

Editor-in-Chief of e-Health Publication

http://www.WomensHealthSection.com

 

From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org] Sent: Tuesday, March 29, 2016 1:37 PMTo: rita@womenshealthsection.comSubject: [World We Want 2030] E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil commented on the Discussion "National Implementation"

 

Olga Saet (not verified)

Dear all,

Thank you for a very interesting discussion and the opportunity to contribute to it.

I would like to share some experience from Belarus on SDGs localization.

In October 2015, the UN in Belarus undertook a global best practice on rolling out and localizing the SDGs through the #UN70BelarusExpress. The unprecedented Initiative started in Minsk, where the President planted a Tree of Peace and Sustainable Development, mirroring the Belarus-led event held at the UN Headquarters in New York where the tree of Peace and Unity was planted. The day continued with the signing ceremony of the UNDAF, followed by the opening of a historical exhibition about 70 years of partnership between the UN and Belarus, and the departure of the UN Train. The train travelled to every Oblast (district of the country) bringing together more than 150,000 participants from 40 countries, including senior Government officials, parliamentarians, all the regional governors, 100 NGOs, 25 private sector partners, 30 embassies, students, journalists, religious leaders from all faiths, representatives of vulnerable groups, UN Goodwill Ambassadors and more than 250 staff from 12 UN agencies including regional directors and the SG’s Youth Envoy through more than 250 activities in 8 days.

The #UN70BelarusExpress for SDGS resulted in unprecedented visibility for the UN across Belarus and beyond (280 articles in international and national media; 75,500 reached on Facebook and 3,000 Tweets and retweets); multi-stakeholder SDG plans being developed nationally as well as commitments in each province of the country; numerous new partnerships in each region; and several resource mobilization opportunities from bilateral donors and private sector.

The UN in Belarus also organized a high impact advocacy campaign #InslusiveBelarus SDGs 4 All aimed at fighting stigma, raising awareness and empowering vulnerable groups. A 28 - day initiative was focused on the issues related to gender equality and domestic violence, HIV/AIDS, disability, migrants and refugees, youth and children. Within the campaign a 10-day Human Rights Film Festival and exhibition dedicated to human rights was  organized by the UN in partnership with 15 countries, Government and NGOs. The campaign touched the hearts and minds of thousands of people directly, while countless others were reached through media. This year we will bring #InclusiveBelarus SDGs 4 All at the local level through a large-scale regional campaign. A special emphasis will be placed on reaching the marginalized population, such as the poor, youth, senior citizens, women, people living with HIV, people with disabilities, refugees and migrants.

Capitalizing on the success of the #UN70BelarusExpress and #InclusiveBelarus, the UN developed a joint strategy to support the implementation of the 2030 Agenda – the 5 “A” Approach:

  1. Analysis of the national policies in order to evaluate the level of integration of SDG targets and indicators, identify data gaps in terms of integration and create a mapping of “excluded” targets and indicators.
  2. Awareness building aimed at achieving a similar level of understanding of the SDGs among different stakeholders and the UN Agencies.
  3. Advocacy on the new development agenda targeted at donors, Government and private sector through provision of evidence related to needs and efficient policies, as well as criteria of effective technical assistance.
  4. Application of the analytical data to the National Development Strategy 2030, national and regional Plans, the UNDAF, the new Country Programme Documents of UNDP, UNICEF, UNFPA.
  5. Accountability to ensure that citizens and all the national stakeholders have access to relevant information; and can provide feedback and influence the process of SDGs implementation; establishing a robust and transparent monitoring and reporting mechanism.
E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for sharing Belarus experience on SDGs localization. It certainly gives us practical examples on how to use advocacy and how to mobilize partners in support of the implementation of the 2030 Agenda at the national and sub-national levels.

Rita Luthra

Please remove my e-mail from your mailing list

 

Thank You

 

 

Rita Luthra, MD

President

Women's Health and Education Center (WHEC)

NGO in Special Consultative Status with Economic and Social Council of the United Nations

Editor-in-Chief of e-Health Publication

http://www.WomensHealthSection.com

 

From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org] Sent: Tuesday, March 29, 2016 1:37 PMTo: rita@womenshealthsection.comSubject: [World We Want 2030] E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil commented on the Discussion "National Implementation"

 

Prabhavathy Ramakrishnan • Probationary Officer at Canara Bank from India

Scarcity of resources leads to conflict at all levels. It can be actual or because of the mismanagement and sub optimal utilization. In the world, several factors contribute to violence and conflict. Scarcity of resources and opportunities is one of the key factors. The lack of opportunity to free thinking, speech and exploration really cripple human spirit and leads to divide at many dimensions, be it on the basis of wealth, colour, race, religion, caste, gender or sexual orientation. 

Because of this divide, be it in the name of anything, we are stuck somewhere between our urge for a better world and our own conditioning. 

Let us take the first goal- to end extreme poverty everywhere. Why there is poverty? Like everybody thinks, poverty is not the lack of money. It is purely,the lack of opportunity. Lack of opportunity to get energy to sustain our body and mind In a working condition. Lack of opportunity to live in an environment where air is pure, water is fresh, habitat is not contaminated. Lack of opportunity to have minimum standards of sanitation facilities. Lack of opportunity to sustain a healthy life by accessing better healthcare system. Lack of opportunity to enrich our intelligence with better learning experiences that not just job providing but gives us courage and opportunity to explore new horizons. Lack of opportunity to justice, participation, and decision making. ..It is all about opportunity. Since money can buy opportunity, we overemphasize the role of money. 

Why poverty? Because there is wealth and its accumulation and maximization. It is a bitter truth.

There is abundance of resources in nature to fulfill everyones needs but not for everyone s greed.  Resources are not wealth. Wealth is resources processed and privatised. Let us take an example. Air, our primary need. If it could have been owned and privatised and sold in the market, there would have been air stations and bottled fresh air.Likewise in the case of sunlight. In the case of water it is being done to some extent but not completely succeeded. But I am afraid, in the near future, it can completely be privatised ( here privatisation doesn't mean just by a corporation but by any individual).

Resources which can be owned and substituted can easily be marketed. 

Market means profit. From where does the profit come? Profit comes from the unequal upward flow of resources and downward flow of value. Organizations need profit to sustain and grow. As a management graduate and also working in a related position, I support the profit motive. Firms need growth and expansion. But it is the'how' that matters. Next question is 'how much'

What is the connection between poverty and profit. Well, they start with p. I mean the 'people'. Every organization or every activity needs some effort, intellectually or physically. From where does this effort arise. People. I dont believe that millions of people classified as extremely poor by international agencies sit back and are enjoying their status of being poor. They are making every possible effort to come out of this abyss. Some work hard in the fields without proper technology or guidance or support system. We grab the results of their efforts with negligible cost and procesed or without processed when it reaches the formal markets, its price becomes 500 or600 per cent increased. 

Example: in season the price of tomatoes in Tamil Nadu when it is directly purchased from the farmers, is 40 paise/kg (1 indian rupee= 100paise). But when it reaches the adjoining state Kerala, it becomes 40 rupees. And the price of dairy milk chocolate is 10 rupees in both states.

Some work in the mine fields without proper security cover or insurance and without interval. In most hazardous situations, they work for years and when they retire, what they own is a an amount which is no way a match to what they have given, and an additional bonus of a bunch of chronic diseases. 

Some work in the construction sites and struggle from early morning to midnight, even they bring their children to the work site and leave them there without proper monitoring or force them to work.

The situations and sectors are not exhaustive. In every sector more or less this happens. The level of severity varies.

And some unfortunate people who don't get even this opportunity, becomes beggars in the street, thieves in the shadowed allies of city, get attracted to underworld crimes, drug trafficking and abuse, and finally to extremism and terrorism.

Now it becomes  somewhat clear. The origin of profit and poverty. The extra normal maximization of profit and the extra normal dip in the standards of living of people. 

So goal no 1 to end extreme poverty everywhere is quite achievable if there is an order for everything. I mean, we need a radical transformation in every sector. The way we consider our people, the way they are being treated, the way they see themselves. I think, the change should come from the bottom line. The united nations can become a facilitating agency in this. I don't that you have all the resources to fund the goal no 1. It is primarily the responsibility of the respective governments to take action. But the governments' role is mainly regulatory. And the resources should come from where all these profit go. The industry should come forward and draw the fine lines between growth and abnormal growth and should avoid all such unethical and inhumane activities that leads to abnormal growth and extreme poverty. I urge United Nations to take up the matter with the corporate world and with the much larger informal sector.

But in the case of agriculture sector, we don't have an organization or consortium to take up the matter. This sector is loosely organized and where to speak I don't know.

I think that information is the key to the awareness. If the people know that they  can live a life with dignity, this is not their fate but a forced choice, they will ask for it. We have witnessed many such uprisings that turned violent and sometimes into a civil war. We have seen many dictators fleeing and many governing systems collapsing. But I still believe in the power of such an uprising. We need the potential of a global uprising, that is peaceful, creative, intelligent, constructive and equitable and sustainable. We need a revolution that doesn't shed a drop of blood, that aims the heart of people and transform.

I haven't touched yet the remaining 16 goals. But I think, if we achieve this goal by 2030 then it is like we have done somewhat all the goals to some extend. I haven't also touched the solution part very much. I think that I can mail it to you.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank your for your contribution to our e-discussion. Erradicating poverty is a fundamental achievement for the success of the 2030 Agenda and is recognized as such once, in its preamble, the 2030 Agenda stress that "eradicating poverty in all its forms and dimensions, including extreme poverty, is the greatest global challenge and an indispensable requirement for sustainable development" (Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, available at: https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/post2015/transformingourworld). The 2030 Agenda also calls for action on the issue by emphasizing that "We are determined to end poverty and hunger, in all their forms and dimensions, and to ensure that all human beings can fulfil their potential in dignity and equality and in a healthy environment".

For more information on the issue, please check the UN's Secretary-General 2014 report: "The road to dignity by 2030: ending poverty, transforming all lives and protecting the planet", available at: https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/topics/povertyeradication.

On the economic alternatives for poverty erradication, you can also check the "Sustainable Development Issues Briefs" issued by UN DESA, available at: https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/resources/sdissuesbriefs.

Rita Luthra

Please remove my e-mail from your mailing list

 

Thank You

 

 

Rita Luthra, MD

President

Women's Health and Education Center (WHEC)

NGO in Special Consultative Status with Economic and Social Council of the United Nations

Editor-in-Chief of e-Health Publication

http://www.WomensHealthSection.com

 

From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org] Sent: Tuesday, March 29, 2016 3:39 PMTo: rita@womenshealthsection.comSubject: [World We Want 2030] E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil commented on the Discussion "National Implementation"

 

Sylvia Briggs (not verified)

Successful implementation of the 2030 agenda at the National and sub-national levels requires legislation considerations and actions to support the process.

This involves (among others):

  • Ammendments to a number of existing laws that are critical to the actualization of this 'bold' ambition.
  • Passage of pending legislations that are aligned to this global agenda at the National and sub-national levels.
  • Consideration and enactment of new legislation to directly enable the implementation of the SDGs. 

This calls for sensitization on the domestication of the 2030 agenda and innovative advocacy strategies for legislation considerations and actions to support the implementation. 

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. A revision on national and sub-national legislation can surely facilitate both the mainstreaming of the SDGs into public policy and its further implementation.

Rita Luthra

Please remove my e-mail from your mailing list

 

Thank You

 

 

Rita Luthra, MD

President

Women's Health and Education Center (WHEC)

NGO in Special Consultative Status with Economic and Social Council of the United Nations

Editor-in-Chief of e-Health Publication

http://www.WomensHealthSection.com

 

From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org] Sent: Tuesday, March 29, 2016 3:39 PMTo: rita@womenshealthsection.comSubject: [World We Want 2030] E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil commented on the Discussion "National Implementation"

 

Bishwa Tiwari • Programme Specialist at UNDP

National Implementation of the SDGs

SDGs is much more ambitious than the MDGs as it has a huge coverage, spanning much beyond the traditional domain of social sector, with enhanced focused on economic dimension and a larger coverage of environmental dimension.  Based on my experience in MDG localization and the implementation of the poverty reduction strategy papers (PRSPs), I would like to make the following observations for the effective implementation of the SDGs at the national level:

  1. Localization of the SDGs. This means different things to different people. It’s also because the definition of the localization has been expanding over time. In the beginning of the MDG era, it has been thought as anchoring the MDG targets at national plan. However, overtime it moved beyond to national level, and thus localization has started been treated as the anchoring of the MDGs targets both at national and sub-national levels. But there has been one issue that could not get resolved – this is about whether the sub-national units which are lagging behind more in a target than the other sub-regions should set a higher target in their annual plan?

    The concept of localization moved beyond the content (such as targets) to the process which is mainly because unless we create ownership of any plan it is difficult to achieve. Given the magnitude of the SDGs, I understand that localization should refer the wider context -- both the process and content as well as localization both at national and sub-nation levels.

    But there is another question, i. e. localization at what sub-national level of units?  Several countries have several tiers of administrative units such as country, province/state, district, blocks, and villages. In such a situation it becomes difficult to reach at the last tier of the localization unless there is adequate data and information. Therefore, it’s good to start the localization first from the national level and then gradually moving to the next tier.

  2. Effective localization of SDGs depends on availability of adequate data. Generally, there is lack of adequate data in developing countries on higher level or outcome level of indicators at disaggregated level because these type of data generally collected through household surveys which becomes much more expensive if they are to give representative values at much disaggregated level. Therefore, unless the institutional system of administrative data is strengthened it becomes difficult to localize at the sub-national level. However given the higher resources and larger population, cities have better data availability which could help localize the SDGs at the larger city level.

  3. The effective implementation of the SDGs requires that the national plan and programmes are backed up by adequate resources. With the localization of SDGs into national planning, the number of interventions seems to be increasing that would result in thin distribution of resources and thus project interventions may lack adequate resources so as to produce much desired impact. In view of this, perhaps it is necessary to choose/prioritize programmes and projects which have higher coverage, impact and sustainability so that the selected ones have a higher pay off and impact.

  4. More importantly, availability of data is necessary not only for planning but also for effective implementation of the SDGs. However, given the large number of indicators (230) it seems difficult to many developing countries to monitor all the global indicators, let alone the other national indicators. Therefore, unless development partners extend their support beyond the planning and programming, it will become a difficult venture for the developing countries.

  5. However, a sustained tracking and monitoring of indicators as well as enhanced coordination between various partners requires a detailed monitoring framework which outlines indicators, sources of data, responsible agencies, institutional framework for monitoring and tracking indicators, and feeding the monitoring results into planning. But many developing countries have a fragmented national level monitoring and evaluation system. Though there is provision of M & E framework at project level, it is also necessary to have an overall national framework to look into how various programmes and projects contribute to the achievement of the national goals. Therefore, the very first step in the process of improving monitoring of SDGs and/or national plan is to develop an M & E system.

  6. But more importantly the need is to institutionalize the M & E system. Many countries developed and/or have a national level M & E framework but they aren’t effective because they lack proper institutionalization in the government system. Among others, the institutionalization also requires adequate budget allocation for M &E in various government ministries and departments. In fact, as M & E is also a measure of enhanced transparency and accountability, very often it is not of high property in the government radar.  Therefore, in the face of inadequate resources, the M & E does not appear fully operational in several developing countries.

  7. Finally, we should not create a parallel planning and monitoring structure in the government system with the localization of the SDGs. In fact, both the planning and monitoring of the SDGs be embedded in the government systems. Unless it is done so, it is difficult to achieve SDGs. After all the government is in the driving seat and is the most responsible of all the national stakeholders.

    I look forward to receiving further insights on my observations.

    Bishwa Tiwari Inclusive Growth & Sustainable Development

UNDP Bangkok Regional Hub

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your contribution. You have raised important issues in what regards localization of the SDGs, from its concept to the need to set up proper structures to monitor and evaluate the SDGs at the national and sub-national levels.

Rita Luthra

Please remove my e-mail from your mailing list

 

Thank You

 

 

Rita Luthra, MD

President

Women's Health and Education Center (WHEC)

NGO in Special Consultative Status with Economic and Social Council of the United Nations

Editor-in-Chief of e-Health Publication

http://www.WomensHealthSection.com

 

From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org] Sent: Tuesday, March 29, 2016 3:39 PMTo: rita@womenshealthsection.comSubject: [World We Want 2030] E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil commented on the Discussion "National Implementation"

 

Appolinaire ZAGABE K

Achieving the Post 2015 UN agenda and the 2030 development goals depends on how local communities are given to opportunity to participate in the implementation. this means not rely or give much importance to International Organisation in activities but the local community is the key passing trough national and local civil society organisations.

 

Additionally, there are many areas where the development goals are never heard, there is a need of sensatisation  of the concerned population from the rural areas to towns,  

And also give developing countries that are much vulnerable to decide from where to start in stead of imposing them what to do as they know better their problems than everyone.

thanks

www.pepahumandignity.org

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. Several participants of our e-discussion agree with you in what regards the need to design proper communication and advocacy strategies as means to engage people from all sectors of society in the discussion and implementation of the 2030 Agenda.

Rita Luthra

Please remove my e-mail from your mailing list

 

Thank You

 

 

Rita Luthra, MD

President

Women's Health and Education Center (WHEC)

NGO in Special Consultative Status with Economic and Social Council of the United Nations

Editor-in-Chief of e-Health Publication

http://www.WomensHealthSection.com

 

From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org] Sent: Tuesday, March 29, 2016 3:39 PMTo: rita@womenshealthsection.comSubject: [World We Want 2030] E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil commented on the Discussion "National Implementation"

 

Priya Kanayson (not verified)

Effective implementation and the achievement of the SDGs and targets rests on the ability to monitor and review commitments and hold governments accountable, and the ability of governments to adapt the global goals and targets to fit their national context. At the forefront of this is the need for governments to adapt the SDGs with an integrated, ‘whole of government,’ approach. The interlinked and indivisible nature of the SDGs necessitates inter- and intrasectoral cooperation to develop comprehensive national strategies. It is important to note that adapting the SDGs to national contexts is not an allowance to prioritise the SDGs or treat the 169 goals as a menu of options. Governments must make progress towards all 169 targets, but in some countries, certain goals and targets must be acted on and progress made before others can be achieved. Good practice examples of platforms for multisectoral collaboration should be made available for Member States to adapt to their own unique contexts, for example in a designated online repository.

Capitalising on existing structures and mechanisms will help governments implement the Agenda, and to utilise existing untapped synergies. Multistakeholder and multisectoral partnerships and involvement is crucial for successful national implementation of the Agenda. As exemplified by the HIV/AIDS response during the MDGs, strengthening civil society and empowering communities are fundamental strategies to reducing inequities, improving prevention and treatment, and delivering results. Non-communicable diseases particularly require a whole-of-society approach to support health-promoting environments, as well as empowered community systems, civil society and patient networks to act as stewards and engines of change. Fundamental to this is the meaningful engagement of civil society in policy-making, decision-making and the implementation and monitoring of services.

BNEIJARA (not verified)

La mise en œuvre efficace et la réalisation des ODD et desobjectifs repose sur la capacité de surveiller et d'examen des engagements ettenir les gouvernements responsables, et la capacité des gouvernements à adapterles buts et objectifs mondiaux en fonction de leur contexte national. Poursoutenir le développement des pays africains il faut une transformationéconomique et structurelle, des innovations technologies, un développementhumain, des financements et de partenariats nationaux (Sud-Sud). Cela est d’autantvrai que tant que le gouvernement croit que les partenaires sont une tutelle etnon un appui le développement ne sera le problème de personne. Personne n’estLead…………. Dans notre pays la Mauritanieaucune structure inclusive ou mécanisme n’existent  pour aider  le gouvernement à mettre en œuvre des ODD. Lemanque de et de synergie constitue un un handicap majeur.

Si aujourd’hui  lerenforcement de la société civile et l'autonomisation des communautés sont desstratégies fondamentales pour réduire les inégalités cela n’est pas applicabledans notre pays ou les communautés et la SC ne sont la préoccupation depersonne.

2016-03-25 15:10 GMT+00:00 <notification@unteamworks.org>:

You can post a reply on Teamworks by replyi

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. Regarding partnerships for development, you should check the 2016 ECOSOC Partnership Forum “From commitments to results: Leveraging partnerships for the 2030 Agenda”, which wil be held at the United Nations Headquarters on March 31st, 2016. Additional information on the 2016 ECOSOC Partnership Forum is available at: https://www.un.org/ecosoc/en/node/355639.

Ednam Songhai

Bonjour, J'ai conduis la 2ème phase des consultations nationales post- 2015 approfondies au Togo, portant sur le «renforcement des capacités et construction des institutions efficaces» dans le cadre de la mise en oeuvre des ODD. Les consultations ont été organisées en août 2014 à l’endroit de différents acteurs dans le but de tirer les leçons du rôle des capacités institutionnelles dans la mise en œuvre des OMD et de dégager des perspectives sur les types de capacités critiques et d’institutions à développer pour améliorer la performance des objectifs de développement durable. Les capacités demeurent le défi critique pour la mise en œuvre et les performances des ODD. Il y a lieu pour les Nations Unies d'appuyer l’évaluation des capacités et d'aider, de conseiller les pays a identifier le types de capacités a construire. Cela depend du contexte de chaque pays. Il faut aider à construire le modèle d’efficacité institutionnelle. Je travaille à développer ce modèle à partir du développement local. Les collectivités locales sont le point de départ de la reussite des ODD. Elles sont le lieu de la participation qui comprend elle-meme l'identité, la norme, la contribution, la rétribution, le contrôle, et la redevabilité.C'est sur la base du modèle d’efficacité institutionnelle basée sur la satisfaction (les résultats), la participation et la redevabilité institutionnelle qu'il faut bâtir le modèle d'institution efficace à partir des capacités appropriées au niveau local.
Ednam Songhaï

E-discussion Facilitator

Merci pour votre commentaire. Construire l'efficacité institutionnelle a partir du développement local semble être une excellente stratégie pour les pays qui se préparent à mettre en œuvre l'Agenda 2030.

Terry Sloan

Implementing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development will require some step by step guidance with examples provided on how others may have already accomplished a working Sustainable Development program or agenda.   I think more specific questions could be asked by the U.N. for many to focus on, in other words maybe provide some recommended guidance. 

The goals for each State, municipality, village, Tribe and Indigenous Peoples will vary immensely.  Maybe taking a poll from various regions around Mother Earth may further help narrow specifics on what is needed or what needs to be focused on first.   Maybe general categories could be utilized like Earth, Water and Air.  From there build more detailed specifics, like land erosion, mining desecration, drought, farming growth or deterioration, permaculture; sea, lake and river health, inclusive of contamination prevention or response (i.e., superfund cleanup); collecting statistics Mother Earth wide on air quality levels where those with the worst can be targeted/prioritized to clean up first, those with good air quality can be studied as to how and why the air is good.  Identifying what contributes to good air quality based on the regions geography.   

The U.N. should also ask for companies and organizations throughout the World to submit their processes and techniques that accomplish Sustainable Development Goals, and create a “Directory” for the world to access.   The U.N. could promote this directory to entice organizations and companies to participate in the “Directory” development.  I believe a U.N. designation of some level would immensely benefit any organization/company. 

As part of the development process, a “Universal Manual’ with policies and procedures on proven Sustainable Development techniques would benefit the World.  Detail guidance is what is needed.  The U.N. could ask organizations to submit information in set formats that could be easily accumulated and organized for publication.   There are many accounting firms worldwide that work with policy and procedural development for all levels of government, public, private, non-profit, for-profit where specifics on what to do and how to do it are developed.  Such a mechanism could be tapped into that could further get worldwide ownership and SDG promotion at a corporate and media level as a by-product, further advancing the 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. Your suggestions will certainly help improve the role of the UN development system in supporting knowledge and experience sharing. If you do not already know, you should check the Sustainable Development Knowledge Platform (https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org) that DESA's Division for Sustainable Development manages. For further suggestions on how to improve the platform, you can contact the Division for Sustainable Development at: https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/account.php?menu=1727.

Rita Luthra

Please remove my e-mail from your mailing list

 

Thank You

 

Rita Luthra, MD

President

Women's Health and Education Center (WHEC)

NGO in Special Consultative Status with Economic and Social Council of the United Nations

Editor-in-Chief of e-Health Publication

http://www.WomensHealthSection.com

 

From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org] Sent: Tuesday, March 29, 2016 3:40 PMTo: rita@womenshealthsection.comSubject: [World We Want 2030] E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil commented on the Discussion "National Implementation"

 

Satishkumar Belliethathan

The following is a short list of some of points that address the three discussion points 

1.     How can the SDGs be effectively mainstreamed into relevant national sustainable development policies and programmes, while preserving countries' policy space to pursue national priorities? How can the UN development system best support this?

 

  1. The implementation of the Agenda 2030 should be led by the national development agency (wherever necessary in partnership with the agency that deals with Climate Change issues (leading to the synergy between the two). The implementation agency should set up a platform for interaction/engagement by all different sectors and at all levels. The agency to use the existing platforms wherever appropriate (fe in many countries there are already existing Sustainable Development Councils).
  2. The implementing agency should conduct a comprehensive assessments of the existing national policies and programmes, the synergies, overlaps, gaps etc viz a viz Agenda 2030.
  3. The assessment should also include experiences from the ground (also from countries with similar experiences), best case examples etc – which will provide concrete evidences feeding the effective policy processes.
  4. Outputs from the assessment to feed the comprehensive discussions on the national and sub-national policies and programmes with regards to the 2030 Agenda and the discussions should be organized involving all stakeholders (for different goals). Discussions should also include the issues and priorities at the regional level.
  5. With the existing demographic changes (in Africa) special emphasis should be given for the participation of youth and women in the discussions.
  6. The output of the discussions  to support the prioritization of the areas, extent and level of intervention so as to achieve the nationally contextualized goals and targets, which will be localized at the district level (with leverage to readjust as necessary at the local level).
  7. The support of the UN system is crucial for the implementation of Agenda 2030 more so in the mainstreaming process. The country team of UN to support the national governments in the process (also based on the experience through the ONE UN initiative). The support to be through technical expertise as well as through placement of UN staff/experts within the national planning unit to guide the processes.   to the national planning unit.

 2) What are key areas for making progress on and building national and sub-national capacities for sustainable development, and how do they differ across country contexts (e.g. least developed countries, middle income countries, high-income countries, countries in situations of fragility etc.)? When and how can partnerships effectively contribute to capacity building and sustainable development?

  1. The national coordination unit/ministry for Agenda 2030 implementation should undertake a comprehensive capacity needs assessment across different sectors and at all levels (egs. Ethiopia has undertaken such an assessment for the implementation of its Climate Resilient Green Economy Strategy at national level for effective implementation, UNITAR also supports the climate change capacity needs assessment through it UNCC Learn programme in several countries). This will support to enhance the synergy between different capacity building initiatives within the country.
  2. Based on the assessment  – a comprehensive capacity building programme should be implemented for various sectors and at various levels – targeted and need based (both formal and non-formal education). ICT/Web based platforms should support the capacity building initiatives (fe UNITAR courses etc).
  3. Special emphasis for capacity building should be given to youth and women
  4. A Transparent and accountable system to be put in place, which will drastically increase the implementation capacity of the nation states and avoid opportunities for misuse and mismanagement and work towards empowering the communities and stakeholders. The system could also be web based with sufficient mechanisms to allow rural communities to access at the district (lowest administrative units) level, considering that Internet penetration rates are extremely low in many countries.    
  5. Comprehensive advocacy programme should be implemented using various means including social media to build all relevant stakeholders. Considerable sections of population still have minimal information on Agenda 2030 and will hinder the successful implementation.
  6. Partnerships are very crucial for the effective implementation of Agenda 2030, including capacity building initiatives. The key features of an effective partnership would be the following (short list); should be need based, have long term plans with multiplier effect, should be mutually beneficial, incorporate adaptive management supporting course correction as and when necessary, should have a clear monitoring, evaluation and reporting obligations, scalable project etc.

3.     What steps are necessary to ensure that all stakeholders, including the government, private sector and civil society can readily exchange information and experiences? How can "peer exchange" be established and nurtured?

  1. The Coordination Unit within the implementation agency/ministry at the national level to establish a platform for stakeholder engagement (to utilize existing platforms where ever possible fe. SD Councils). The platform to be established to support the experience exchange amongst various stakeholders amongst other functions. The involvement of the private sectors especially through the Chamber of Commerce should be
  2. Existing indigenous method of governance and information sharing should be utilized to disseminate and collect information apart from information collection through formal associations etc.  
  3. Government offices at local level should have a mechanism to obtain information through various means including Internet based considering that they will implement a localized Agenda 2030.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. Your suggestions wil be added to the final report of this e-discussion and should help ECOSOC define how to best address implementation challenges of the 2030 Agenda.

S ann • from United States

Dear Pedro and Colleagues:

Implementation of environmental laws concerns both domestic and the international community.   All nations are responsible for the global activities that contribute to global warming, climate change, and other man-made environmental hazards.  The environment can no longer be neglected and ignored; saving and protecting the environment must be considered a priority to all nations.

International treaties shape national legislation with the intent of implementation. Due to the inaction of Member States, it is incumbent upon the United Nations to take a proactive approach by holding Member States accountable for their failure to implement environmental laws whether they are signators of treaties or not.  Member States’ failure to implement such laws adversely impact the whole international community.

Governments must be mandated to implement precautionary and sustainable development measures, to include requiring corporations and businesses to submit environmental impact assessments for licensing certifications and periodic reviews to ensure environmental protection.  Voluntary commitments are the best practices in implementing environmental laws.  The value of the commitments is significant to trade and investment relationships as the environment improves.  Implementation of environmental laws not only improves the environment; it is good for business.

Governments must also be required to make full disclosures through transparency, informing the public of environmental activities that may adversely impact the environment at all levels (local, national, regional, and international).   People have a right to know.    In addition, more funding is needed for research and education.   Education is very critical to the implementation process, as people must be educated in changing the way they live to reduce further harm to the environment.

I would like to add, my initial response above  speaks from an environmental stance, which five of the SDGs directly relate to.  The SDGs are quite ambitious and overlap with existing initiatives, agreements and treaties.  It would be more effective to link the goals/targets with existing initiatives, agreements and treaties.  Additionally, since the SDGs are not legally binding, without such mandate it is pretty much business as usual, except for the nations who are truly committed.  Another recommendation is for the UNDP to identify Member States who have actually implemented the goals and targets and share their strategies and results.

Renata Aquino Ribeiro (not verified)

Hello!

As a follow up to this discussion, it is important to acknowledge that national represention does have to be inserted in the larger context of international actions. A country may be representing itself as diverse and interested in the SDGs in international venues but its national leaderships in the organizations do not really translate these objectives into actions.

For a higher rate of success of national implementations, therefore, a continuous and broad dialogue between national organizations and international initiatives must happen. Criteria in national leadership must align with those of international initiatives, bringing in aspects such as gender diversity in leadership.

Only then and if then it is possible to consider national implementation successful, if the bridge remains with international initiatives and practice is modeled in fairness.

 

All the best

 

Renata

Becaye DIARRA • Economics Advisor at UNDP

One of the major challenge advanced by analyst on SDGs implementation is the fact that SDGs are "not a the same level". Some are very general, others are specific. But this could be a "good new" based on countries' context and experience, especially post-conflit countries. Indeed, it is possible to find one "Core SDG" which captures almost all the national objectives and priorities defined in national strategies; while other SDGs could be considered as "Prior SDGs" to cross before attaining the "Core SDG". To illustrate what we mean by "Core SDG" and "Prior SDG", let's look at the example of Mali, a post-conflic country with a Peace Accord and a nationa strategy named the “Strategic Framework for Economic Recovery and Sustainable Development":

In order to take the new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) into national strategies and to help prioritize, the government of Mali and UNDP adopted an approach based on a theory of change, which consists of:

  • Establishing the relationships between the main priorities and the validated SDGs;

  • Identifying the cause-effect patterns between the various objectives;

  • Defining a strategy to guide the change in the selected SDGs.

 

To illustrate this approach, the Peace Accord aims at creating in Mali, a peaceful society and foster national cohesion favorable to development initiative; this is in relation with SDG 16. The Peace Accord provides the setting up of a development area for the northern regions based on the Specific Development Strategy (SSD) meant to bring northern regions to the same level of development as the rest of the country, in a 10 to 15 year period. This calls for a decrease in regional disparities and socio economic inequalities (refer to SDG 10). In the next 15 years, Mali intends to alleviate poverty through a sustained economic growth already initiated in 2014 and 2015, with 7.2 and 5.8% (related to SDG 1 and 8), respectively. The goal is to consolidate the strong growth through the diversification of growth sources and economic transformation.

 

Therefore, the overall approach is to use the theory of change in order to shed more light on the rationale behind the interactions between SDGs as stated in the national priorities (the long term vision: Prospective Study “Mali 2025” and the Emerging Mali Plan).

To Recapitulate:

1. Identify the long term outcomes of the national Strategy

2. Identify the formulated SDG similar the this outcome, as "the Core SDG"

3. Identify the national medium-term objectives as "Prior SDGs"

4. Use the Theory of Change to build relationship on how "Prior SDGs" have to be "cross" to get into the "Core SDG"

5. Prioritize upon timing

6. Mainstream by revising the national strategy

7. Action Plan for Implementation.

Hope this is useful

 

 

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for sharing Mali's experience on mainstreaming the SDGs into national strategies.

Roberto Borrero (not verified)

Initiatives to mainstream the SDGs into relevant national sustainable development policies and programmes should emphasize multi-stakeholder partnerships that facilitate full, effective, and meaningful participation of all stakeholders, including Indigenous Peoples, in planning, implementation, and evaluation processes. In States where Indigenous Peoples make up a small minority, for example, it maybe tempting for policy makers to marginalize them as Governments at the national level could choose to develop programs aimed at larger groups to improve their national level results. 

 

With this in mind, a human rights based approach promoting universality and inalienability; indivisibility; inter-dependence and inter-relatedness; non-discrimination and equality; participation and inclusion; accountability and the rule of law is critical to moving these processes forward if the theme “leaving no one behind” is a priority. Additionally, in relation to Indigenous Peoples, SDG implementation and monitoring at the national level should be guided by indigenous peoples’ human rights, as enshrined in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and multiple other human rights instruments. For proper monitoring, rights related indicators and disaggregated data are critical.

 

It is important to note that while Indigenous Peoples are only specifically mentioned in two of the SDG targets, there is a huge potential to advance indigenous peoples’ rights through the SDGs – and to use UNDRIP and  other human rights instruments to guide SDG implementation and monitoring.

The adoption of indicators relevant for indigenous peoples under the 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda also has the potential to enable and support important community-based monitoring work by indigenous peoples relating to self-determination and sustainable development. Multiple sources of data from complementary monitoring systems, must underpin the evidence base needed for robust and participatory monitoring of the SDGs. Through the use of indicators relevant for indigenous peoples, a genuine partnership amongst United Nation agencies, governments and indigenous peoples can be forged, towards realizing respect and progressive realization of human rights for all, and ensuring no one is left behind.

Maik Duennbier (not verified)

Thank you for the opportunity to contribute to this E-discussion.

It's a privilege for me to share some input on behalf of IOGT International.

Concerning question 3: What steps are necessary to ensure that all stakeholders, including the government, private sector and civil society can readily exchange information and experiences? How can "peer exchange" be established and nurtured?

When engaging with the private sector, for the benfit of achieving the Agenda 2030, it is absolutely critical that governments safeguard against and try to eliminate conflicts of interest. Surely, the private sector has a role to play concerning some of the SDGs. But concerning other SDGs, like Goal 3, the presence of conflict of interest should mean that governments safeguard against undue influence of the private sector, to keep the integrity of the Agenda 2030 intact.

For example, the alcohol industry does not have a role to play in achieving the Agenda 2030 because as producers of alcohol, as marketers of their products, and as aggressive lobbyists to protect their business and their shareholders' interests, the alcohol industry has a fundamental conflict of interest. Sustainable development is dependent on the reduction of alcohol consumption, for alcohol harm to decrease; sustainable development is dependent on preventing an uptake of alcohol use in (for instance) Sub-saharan Africa or India - where the alcohol industry is doing everything they can to establish their brands, even if it means to target children and youth with advertising.

The alcohol industry is just one example for private sector and their affiliates being at odds with the spirit and the vision of the Agenda 2030. Steps are necessary to protect the UN in general and the Agenda 2030 from undue influence and conflict of interest with regard to corporate involvement.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your contribution to our e-discussion. On a UN forum held last September, the Secreaty-General highlighted that: “The SDGs are unprecedented in their ambition – but the fundamental ways that business can contribute remain unchanged”. Mr. Ban also stated that: “First, companies need to do business responsibly and then pursue new opportunities. In short, companies must not make our world’s problems worse before they try to make them better.”

In that regard, the SDG Compass was developed by the GRI, the UN Global Compact and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD), as a guide for companies on how they can align their strategies as well as measure and manage their contribution to the realization of the SDGs. For additional information on the SDG Compass, please check: http://sdgcompass.org/

GEORGES RADJOU (not verified)

Friends,

Please find a new document on the national implemenation attached. it is looking at Post 2015 SDG and national implementation barriers and opportunities trough the lens of Growth and the natural environment and the ownership of ecology through the lens of power and centralism versus people participation. Read more in the document. Thanks,

Georges  BIRD

 

Noella RICHARD • Youth Policy Specialist at UNDP

Dear Colleagues and Partners,

Many thanks for this opportunity to contribute to this timely ECOSOC e-discussion on the 2030 Agenda, the framework that will guide our development priorities for a generation. Interesting inputs have already been provided on stakeholders' engagement and the crucial importance of "leaving no one behind", but I would like to add some thoughts on the issue of youth engagement (inclusive and meaningful engagement) in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda.

Today’s generation of adolescents and young people is close to 1.8 billion (aged 10-24), more than at any other time in human history. They often represent the majority of the population in the developing world. Across the globe, youth are still experiencing interlocked forms of discrimination, limited political participation, high levels of poverty, and limited access to health, education and decent jobs.

 Young people a vital role to play in supporting the implementation of the agenda as well as the SDG monitoring and accountability for the following main reasons:

- Youth empowerment is a human rights imperative;

- Young people experience first-hand many of the issues the 2030 Agenda seeks to address;

- They  have relevant inputs to provide -fresh ideas, innovative solutions- and they have already shown, historically, that they can trigger social change and contribute to development in all its aspects; they can also mobilize today in an unprecedented way;

- They have already played an important role in shaping the 2030 agenda, at all levels, from the grassroots level, by participation in local consultations, to the global level, by participating in global fora meetings and dialogues, or even the post-2015 consultations themselves (e.g. Major Group of Children and Youth);

- Youth are at the very heart of the 2030 Agenda:  “The future of humanity and of our planet lies in our hands. It lies also in the hands of today's younger generation who will pass the torch to future generations.” (2030 Agenda, paragraph 53). In addition, although there is not a standalone "youth goal", 65 out of the 169 SDG targets reference young people explicitly or implicitly, with a focus on empowerment, participation and/or well-being.

- Investing in young people and their full potential will then ensure communities, institutions and societies are more inclusive, participatory and accountable and it will sustain development results.

UNDP’s approach to youth empowerment is founded on partnering with youth as positive agents of change across all dimensions of sustainable development and peace. We promote the empowerment of youth through programmes across its global network, which spans more than 170 countries and territories. We specifically partner with young women and young men as champions of the 2030 Agenda by:

- Supporting governments in mainstreaming youth, as SDGs are integrated into their national and local strategies, by promoting spaces for young people and youth organizations to engage and through a more systematic inclusion of young people in UNDAF and other related processes. Young people should be at the table in national consultations, the establishment of national youth engagement platforms should be encouraged, and young people should have a say when national/ local development priorities are being discussed. The implementation of the UN System-Wide Action Plan on Youth, endorsed in 2013 by the UN CEB, and the work of the UN national task teams/UNDG task teams/inter-agency teams on youth as well as the work of the global inter-agency network on youth development should be further encouraged.

- Identifying obstacles to make progress on SDGs and SDG targets, such as youth low level of participation in decision-making, youth discrimination, etc.

- Providing effective, demand-driven, context-specific technical assistance to enhance youth participation in governance, youth economic empowerment and youth participation in peacebuilding and resilience-building. We also support the alignment of inclusive national youth policies with the SDGs. UNDP will launch soon its first comprehensive global initiative to empower youth for sustainable development and peace (global, regional, national, gender equality windows).

- Encouraging and supporting young people’s efforts to produce and present quality data on progress made in the achievement of the SDGs. The participation of youth in the implementation and monitoring of Goal 16 in particular will certainly strengthen youth engagement overall.

- Partnering with young people’s organizations, academia and research institutes to produce fresh insights, on youth, peace and security, on financing for youth, on youth role in the prevention of conflict and of violent extremism, etc.

- Promoting the role of young people as SDG partners, supporters, ambassadors, champions in social media campaigns and advocacy initiatives.

The 2016 ECOSOC Youth Forum recently took place in New York and resulted in the issuance of a Presidential Statement (Ambassador Oh-Joon, Republic of Korea): http://www.un.org/en/ecosoc/president/statement_2016/youth_forum-presidential_statement_2016.pdf

For more information on UNDP’s work on, with and for youth: www.undp.org/youth (Fast Facts on Youth as Partners for the Implementation of the SDGs: http://www.undp.org/content/undp/en/home/librarypage/results/fast_facts/fast-facts--youth-as-partners-for-the-implementation-of-the-sdgs.html)

Thank you very much and looking forward to partnering with all of you.

 

 

 

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for sharing practical examples on promoting youth engagement as positive agents of change for the 2030 Agenda.

Rob Wheeler

Developing National and Sub-national Capacities for Implementing the SDGs and Mainstreaming Sustainability in National Policies and Programmes

 

If we want to ensure that sufficient action is taken at the national, regional and local level to fully implement and achieve the SDGs then it is essential that the United Nations and it’s Member States develop guidelines for implementing the SDGs at the National and Local level. These guidelines should include such things as: 

 

• Integrating planning and implementation both horizontally and vertically (thus across all goals, sectors, and issue areas and across all levels of the society and government)

 

  • Striving to achieve all of the other multi-national sustainable development agreements that have been made to date, along with the SDGs, and in a fully cross-sectoral, integrated and cohesive manner

 

• Adopting comprehensive national and state legislation for implementing the SDGs and 2030 agenda, based on the findings and input from Local, Regional and National Sustainability Councils and participatory multi-stakeholder processes 

 

• Establishment of an administrative and coordinating office within the executive or administrative branch of government

 

• Ensuring that government ministers are fully engaged in the process, along with the leaders from the business community and leading civil society organizations

 

• Establishment of multi-stakeholder cross-sectoral working groups or task forces

 

• Including the participation of the academic community and educational institutions in the planning and implementation processes - and particularly to participation of students at all levels in an age appropriate manner in these processes. 

 

• Basing the local and national planning and implementation processes on the Rio Principles

 

• Establishing sustainable development and the achievement of the SDGs as a basic operating principle of governance at all levels of government

 

The implementation processes must be based upon such pre-requisites for creating a sustainable society and economy as: transitioning rapidly to a zero waste, circular economy and extended producer responsibility; restoration of the natural environment; biological waste treatment and processes; restoring natural water cycles and soil health; adoption of renewable energy; eliminating toxic substances; etc. 

 

The guidelines and review processes must look into the extent to which each of the things mentioned above is being incorporated and done at a local, regional and national level. 

 

How the UN development system could provide coordinated and integrated support for the achieving the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs at the National and Local Levels

 

For each of the SDGs a UN agency should be tasked with managing or overseeing the work being done on that Goal and the accompanying Targets and Indicators. Each managing agency or division within DESA would be mandated to support the development of partnership initiatives to aid in implementation for that Goal area. An agency or also should be designated to coordinate and support partnerships that are multi-sectoral in nature and that address multiple targets and goals as well. 

 

Each of the UN agencies should also be mandated and authorized to designate a contact person/office or liaison to support the development of partnership initiatives, particularly those that focus on the mandates of said agency. Each UN agency should be tasked with considering, supporting and participating in those multi-stakeholder partnership initiatives that include a focus and that are oriented towards fulfilling the mandates of that agency and the relevant SDGs and their related targets - and particularly those that include the substantial participation of civil society organizations or are being organized by civil society organizations. 

 

Finally, resources must be made available through UN agencies to support capacity building and development (particularly for civil society and civil society organizations) such as was supposed to be included through  UNDP’s thematic trust funds after WSSD in 2002 before they were phased out. 

 

Rob Wheeler

GEN UN Representative

1-717-264-0957

skype: robineagle333

rob.wheeler@ecovillage.org

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for sharing your ideas on how the creation and implemenation of international guidelines can support the implementing the SDGs at the national and local levels.

Santanu Bhowmick

Dear

Sir/Madam

I am working in rural areas with rural adolescent and youth community. It need to emphasis that we all together need to take collective responsibility for reaching the 2030 agenda of SDGs. Therefore, it only possible when we can ensure the greater participation of youth and grass root level governance in our country. Again this participation must need to adddress the length and breath of the diversified area of Indian subcontinent.

Therefore, more and more youth specific intervention is required at the grass root level which may throw some light on the implementation of SDGs.

Regards

Santanu Bhowmick

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for sharing your ideas on how the youth and grassroot organizations can support the implementation of the 2030 Agenda.

Robert Ruitenbeek • Managing Director / Owner at iNVENTUR! from Netherlands

Dear All,

The principles of sustainable development is a principle of action concerning the whole of humanity and is officially accepted by virtually all decision makers in business and politics. This principle states:

We Humans must move towards the adoption of a lifestyle that can continue indefinitely

In this context we all are developing countries and therefore, through all available institutions, as one species we need to commit, engage & act upon the Sustainable Development Goals 2030 programme.

We Humans need to start right now (re-)educating and mobilizing all peoples in understanding and acting upon the SDG 2030 goals.

So far governments, as they are influenced by large economic entities (i.e. multinationals), have demonstrated to be ineffective (i.e. lack the economic leverage) in really taking the socio-economic-environmental changes forward.

If governments can't and multinationals won't then it's up to us! Now we need to understand that we Humans are the largest socio-economic-environmental entity involved and that we therefore do have the leverage!

Thus, the framework the DESA/UNDP/ECOSOC is looking for should, as opposed to top-down, be organized bottom-up and people-centric!

 

Moving forward to a sustainable lifestyle can be achieved through the following initial approach

1) Educate peoples worldwide on: a.  understanding, acknowledging and acting upon the ‘Universal Declaration of Human Responsibilities’ and the ‘Earth Charter’

b. The urgency to commit, engage & act upon the 2030 SDG’s using data from the Global Footprint Network 2016 accounts,  University of Oxford (PNAS) report ‘Analysis and valuation of the health and climate change cobenefits of dietary change’ and 350.org

c. Improving their bio-footprint (how to live, eat, dwell, work, leisure & travel in a sustainable fashion!) d. Availability of clean technologies for energy, water & transport (Solar, Wind, Tidal, Combined Wind/Water condensation turbines) e. Environmentally Sustainable Farming (without pesticides, herbicides & GMO) f. How to mobilize the socio-economic-environmental influence & Leverage peoples have e. Making choices which will influence nations and industries into sustainability (live, eat, dwell, work, leisure & travel green!)  2) Facilitate (local) governments in changing priorities to: a. Improve availability & accessibility of online knowledge infrastructures & education: b. Reduce bio-footprint through honest (people before profit) information on how to live, eat, dwell, work, leisure & travel accordingly c. Increasingly tax unsustainable products, services & industries (e.g. fast-food, fossil fuels) d. Subsidize natural healthy sustainable products, services & industries  (e.g. natural plant based food, electric engines)  e. Improve & accelerate availability & accessibility of clean technologies for energy, water & transport 3) Encourage nations & other macro-economic entities into becoming people-centric by: a. Turning the unsustainable Profit-before-People premise into an actual sustainable People-before-Profit premise in adherence with Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and ISO 26000 principles b. Adapting monetary systems & economics to support the People-before-Profit premise c. Setting up and applying (inter)national law against any form of (continued) profit-centric exploitation of earth’s resources, animals & peoples d. Supporting industries in understanding their environmental impact & related costs, adapting their business models from a People-before-Profit premise and rendering their products & services sustainable 4) Communicating using modern mobile web techniques we might just pull it off to get the programme forward in a faster pace and in a timely fashion in regard to the TWW2030 goals. For instance: >> DESA/UNDP/ECOSOC could first build an mobile TWW2030 Educational app containing the basics on environmental sustainability!  Secondly one could build an TWW2030 Operations app using the indicator framework for gathering input on Development Goal specific progress. Make deals with international TelCo’s and ISP’s on delivering this apps for free. Promote the availability through an international media campaign (go viral on the web). <<

 

 

 

With this approach we address the following challenges   

- To better the World as targeted by this UN body we Humans need to better ourselves!!

- We need to focus on restoring the balance from social, economic, environmental and systemic perspectives in favor off all nations and all peoples

- As long as 50 percent of global wealth is owned by 3 percent of the global population no real shift in balance is to be expected

- As long as 70 percent of all cereals are shipped and used as food for livestock for western markets no real shift in balance is to be expected

- As long as we allow meat/dairy industry and corporates to eradicate forests and erode more than 50 percent of globally available arable land no real shift in balance is to be expected

- As long as we allow corporates and financial institutions, macro-economic entities bigger than nations, to lobby for and dictate (buy) governmental policies on every aspect of our life no real shift in balance is to be expected

- As long as we allow capital, commercial propaganda to have preference over the wellbeing of Human Kind no real shift in balance is to be expected

- As long as we think that developing nations should do so using western nations as a template no real shift in balance is to be expected

- To have ended poverty, reduced inequalities significantly and reached a level of global sustainability within 15 years we need to start acting today

- Stop eating meat and help rebalance the availability of cereals to end famine- Stop eating dairy products and help rebalance the availability of water- Start eating plant based and help rebalance the availability of arable land for farming- Go vegan, use energy from sustainable sources, drive electric, reuse and end Global Warming

Better yourself and help restore a really healthy, save and sustainable global society!

 

Restoring the social-economic-environmental balance paves the way for final implementation of the Strategic Development Goals

 

Environmental Sustainability can be achieved mainly by implementing SDG 12 (Responsible Consumption and Production) wich in itself implements SDG 13 (Climate Action) as a result of worldwide dietary adaptions (developed countries), and SDG 2 (Hunger) as cereals formerly used as livestock feed comes available for human consumption, and SDG 14 (Life Below Water) and SDG 15 (Life on Land) resulting from a dramatic reduction in animal waste and related greenhouse gases.

Economic Sustainability can be achieved by reinventing our monetary and economic systems based on the people-before-profit premise. This is the one people-centric foundation for SDG’s 9 (Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure), SDG 8 (Decent work and Sustainable Growth), SDG 4 (Quality Education), SDG 10 (Reduced Inequalities) and SDG 7 (Affordable and Clean Energy).

Social Sustainability (SDG’s 6, 3, 5, 1, 11, 16) results from successfully implementing Environmental Sustainability and Economic Sustainability.

 

Kind Regards, Robert

Manuel castrillo • from Costa Rica

Gaining momentum from the grassroots that is from the "bottom up" is waiting for David to rise up against Goliath, and if it was in the past, the same could be expected today. They have the technological means, and even, advances will help the flow of information and knowledge increases. More important is the content of that message effectively to the many actors - people - in such vast cultural settings. The search for balance at national and local level, will be more likely to achieve that longed global consensus.

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. On the subject of grassroots participation in the 2030 Agenda, the UN recognizes that achieving "the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs in each country will depend on collaborative partnerships between governments and non-State actors at all levels, and at all stages of the programmatic cycle-planning, consultations, implementation, monitoring and reviews". Therefore, DESA's Division for Sustainable Development (DSD) "is in the processes of organizing multi-stakeholder consultations and workshops for national and local policy makers in a number of countries to support dialogue and cooperation between national authorities and relevant stakeholder groups. These capacity building events will aim to foster multi-stakeholder cooperation for accountability and transparency, and support national efforts to strategize future engagement with the implementation, follow-up and review of the 2030 Agenda." For more information, please check: https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/majorgroups/national-capacity-bui….

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for your comment. As you know, within the five P's in the 2030 Agenda (people, planet, prosperity, peace and partnership), people are the first in the list because the goals and targets proposed are, most of all, people-centred. Most of the "Major Groups" (nine sectors of society as the main channels through which broad participation would be facilitated in UN activities related to sustainable development) are "people groups", such as women, children and youth, indigenous peoples, workers and trade unions etc. For more information,on Major Groups, please check: https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/majorgroups.

Robert Ruitenbeek • Managing Director / Owner at iNVENTUR! from Netherlands

Dear All,

In addition to previous post I strongly advise to read the attached analysis on the interrelationships between Sustainable Development Targets and dietary change and reflect on how these insights effect the (to be localized) SDG priorities and approach.

Kind regards,

Robert

TCHARBUAHBOKENGO NFINN

Federation of Environmental and Ecological Diversity for Agricultural Revampment and Human Rights ( FEEDAR & HR ) 

P.O.Box 321 KUMBA Meme SWR Cameroon. 

Email : feedar97@yahoo.com, feedar.hr@gmail.com feedarsecretariat@yahoo.com 

Means of implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals Agenda 2030

NATIONAL LEVEL. 

Partnerships between Governments and Civil Society. 

The National means of implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals Agenda 2030 requires that both governments and the non governments work together in a more stronger partnerships to reach the entire 17 Goals by 2030 and beyond.  It has been proven that the government's can not do all the works of a country alone that is why the civil society is very critical to achieving the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals Agenda. I must first of all commend government ministries for their commitment to try to reach everyone in the geographical cycles. In the implementation of the Millennium Development Goals many were left out and many mistakes made.I think it is time informed decisions bring all on the platform so that no one is left behind.

The government's should consider working in strong collaboration with the Civil Society sector. That is to provide a non competitive grants to every Civil Society Organization recognised by the competent administrative authority.This running budget will assist Civil Society increase their capacities to reach their objectives and goals.  This would equally assist the Civil Society to extend their tentacles to secure other funding from other sources and create synergies and partnerships to implement the 17 Goals implementation. The civil society will provide report activities that explains how the budget support was used. This would be evaluated and progress monitored.

The various government ministries to work with the civil society organizations to reach out to everyone, impacting every social group. For example Ministry of Education , not only provides schools to communities but making sure the schools have the necessary basic necessities like enough school Teachers, Benches, rooms, space, library, Canteen, Drinking Water, Toilets and a first aid kit,  A School Bus or any Transportation services. And also constant supplies of learning materials like chalks , writing materials where necessary. 

B)  Partnerships Among Civil Society Organizations 

One of the most important aspects to meet the Agenda 2030 is the partnerships among the civil society groups. Providing a platform for effective approaching Civil Society issues and an environment of effective participation would achieve greatly the Sustainable Development Goals Agenda 2030. This is by involving the women, youths , students, unemployed, disabled, 

C) Other stakeholders including Business and Banks

Many little Businesses face a critical challenge of the inability to secure Loans and benefits from Banks. It therefore very important for financial institutions to laveraging opportunities for all and not only for the rich.

On  Regional Level (CENTRAL AFRICAN REGION ) csoscaregion@gmail.com,  csocaregion@googlegroups.com 

 

Thesame national approach above appliies to all countries in the region , however though the region is considered to be one of the richest in the world in terms of Natural and Mineral Resources it is still the poorest in terms of socio - economic and political paradigm. The standard of living is very poor among the majority of the population,  social security is completely off the table,  security is threatened daily as Conflicts,  Terrorism, Wars, Crime, Corruption and lack of democratic reforms on the rise, outward migration and internally displaced persons.

The formation of a civil society body that would enhance partnerships and efforts to the Agenda 2030 is what is fundamental in the region. In this light the Coalition of Civil Society Organizations in the Central African Region  (CSOSCAR) has created. The Coalition will increase coordination,  participation,  engagement,  implementation and monitoring progress of the 17 Goals in all countries and put in place decency where necessary. 

As a regional institution it will create new partnerships , merge with other regional bodies to the effective implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals Agenda 2030.

It will equally source funding,  interven in Humanitarian Crisis and in other emergency and would be able to  providing a regional reporting mechanism on the progress of the 2030 Agenda in all countries. 

E-discussion Facilitator

Thank you for sharing your thoughts on how civil society can foster partnerships for development at the regional level.

S ann • from United States

While I am grateful for having an opportunity to post a comment relative to the issue at hand, I do not want to receive everyone's comment via my email.  Please discontinue sending them to me.  I will view them on the website.  THANK YOU!S ann

Federation of Environmental and Ecological Diversity for Agricultural Revampment and Human Rights ( FEEDAR & HR ) 

-----Original Message-----From: notification <notification@unteamworks.org>To: eeops <eeops@aol.com>Sent: Tue, Mar 29, 2016 3:31 amSubject: [World We Want 2030] Federation of Environmental and Ecological Diversity for Agricultural Revampment and Human Rights (FEEDAR &amp; HR) commented on the Discussion "National Implementation"

Yelfigne Abegaz • national programme coordinator at UNWomen

Dear facilitators, can you please remove my name from this communication .

 

With advanced thanks,

 

 

 

Yelfigne Abegaz

National Programme Coordinator

UN Women

Kirkos Sub-City, Kebele 01, House NO 110

Next to Olympia Roundabout.

Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

(Office): +251-118-695020, +251-115170822

(Mob): +251-911-638494

E-mail:yelfigne abegaz@unwomen.org

 

       

 

From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org]Sent: Tuesday, March 29, 2016 10:32 AMTo: Yelfigne Abegaz <yelfigne.abegaz@unwomen.org>Subject: [Teamworks] Federation of Environmental and Ecological Diversity for Agricultural Revampment and Human Rights (FEEDAR &amp; HR) commented on the Discussion "National Implementation"

 

Adinda Ceelen

The 2030 Agenda is grounded in the principle of partnership, which stems from a recognition that governments cannot be the sole agent for development. Indeed individual institutional efforts and joint collaboration of various stakeholders – each with their own resources and comparative advantages – are needed to tackle the complex challenges the 2030 Agenda seeks to address. Meaningful and effective stakeholder engagement that includes exchange of information and sharing of experiences is crucial to realize the SDGs. This can be operationalized through the establishment of institutionalized multi-stakeholder spaces for dialogue where the voices of multiple stakeholders can be heard in the design, implementation, monitoring and review of national-level development policies and plans for the 2030 Agenda.

 

Another way to facilitate stakeholders exchanging information and experience is through multi-stakeholder engagement in follow-up and review. The Secretary General calls for such a multi-stakeholder approach in his Report on Follow-up and Review. In terms of the ‘how to’ of conducting multi-stakeholder follow-up and review, the Task Team recommends looking at the monitoring framework of the Global Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation (GPEDC). This monitoring framework can be used as a source of inspiration in light of its emphasis on multi-stakeholder engagement and mutual accountability across stakeholders in reviewing progress at country-level. Like follow-up and review for the 2030 Agenda, the GPEDC’s biennial monitoring exercise is voluntary and state-led. As such, it offers a complement to follow-up and review of the 2030 Agenda that would not create an additional reporting burden on the many participating GPEDC governments.