National Implementation

29 Feb - 25 Mar 2016
Go back to 2016 ECOSOC discussion – Implementing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development
  • How can the SDGs be effectively mainstreamed into relevant national sustainable development policies and programmes, while preserving countries' policy space to pursue national priorities? How can the UN development system best support this?
  • What are key areas for making progress on and building national and sub-national capacities for sustainable development, and how do they differ across country contexts (e.g. least developed countries, middle income countries, high-income countries, countries in situations of fragility etc.)? When and how can partnerships effectively contribute to capacity building and sustainable development?
  • What steps are necessary to ensure that all stakeholders, including the government, private sector and civil society can readily exchange information and experiences? How can "peer exchange" be established and nurtured?

 

Moderator's Message

Dear Colleagues,

A very warm welcome to Thematic Window II, “National Implementation”, of the 2016 ECOSOC e-discussion that will take place from 29 February to 25 March 2016. This e-discussion is a unique opportunity for the broader development community to provide critical policy guidance and recommendations for the 2016 ECOSOC session on “Implementing the 2030 Agenda: moving from commitments to results.”

2015 was a landmark year for development as UN Member States reached historic agreements that will guide development priorities for the coming years. Member States have committed to eradicate poverty, fight inequalities, build peaceful, inclusive and resilient societies, and secure the future of the planet and wellbeing of future generations. Now, in 2016 we begin implementation of the bold 2030 Agenda.

The 2030 Agenda calls for transformational change in every country. It will require ‘landing’ the global agenda at national and sub-national level, in according policies, programmes and budgets, to achieve the ambitious SDGs. This will be determined by national priorities and capacities—The UN Development System stands ready to assist countries in this endeavour. In doing so, it acknowledges the imperative of national ownership, with actions of support firmly determined by country needs and national capacities. UN efforts must be flexible to adapt to country contexts.

We strongly encourage participants to share concrete national, subnational or local experiences so as to effectively guide recommendations for implementation over the coming years. I look forward to a lively and rich discussion in the next few weeks!

Best regards,
Pedro Conceicao

Comments (61)

Sushanta De • Secretary at The Young Explorers\' Institute for Social Service from India

The population of the youths in India is the higest in the world. They ar vibrant,logical and practical in their action. They required some resources where they can explain their thought in their own language. Keeping in this mind our  civil society planned for a series of programmes such as competitions at Kolkata to be held at State Central Library of Government of West Bengal. The details are available at https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/05Z1RB

This society planned to donate books to 39 Higher Secondary & Secondary Schools in West Bengal. At least 39000 students will be benifited out of that.

Noor (not verified)

SDGs are really well directed for development, however, implementation in case of my country (Pakistan) seems next to impossible. Here policies are developed lots of public money is used on that but the implementation has not taken place. We could not meet the MDGs targets and with present indifferent politicians, selfish and non professional civilian and military bureaucracy cannot do anything but can fail the efforts and make things worse so that external funding must be continued and their bank accounts keep going high and high. I am very much worried that the way government is handling the things the targets of SDG 4 will not be achieved. On the other hand the mushroom growth of NGOs in Pakistan have also their own ways, they say, write and report very good but what they do is very different. As far as education is concerned , there are lots of villages, towns and localities in Pakistan where there are no schools at all and there is 100% illiteracy, however, to fight illiteracy and the government agencies and NGOs are opening more and more schools in the same areas where schools are already functioning. same children are enrolled in 2 to 3 schools just to play the number game and earn money. I am sure this is neither their ignorance nor innocence but they ultimate agenda is not education but they have other bearings. I know the UNDP or other bodies of UN work in collaboration with government and many times with some NGOs, but by doing so the impact will be very thin. I suggest to find out the ways where the UN itself should take more responsibility at least in the sates where the governments are irresponsible and take ill-informed decisions.

Dr. Abdalatif Hassan • Economic Analyst at UNDP from Sudan

Abdalatif Hassan

Most of developing countries (Africa in particular) are politically instable with tribal conflicts and civil wars that resulted in IDP and refugees. Consequently, the bulk of the international aid in these countries is in a humanitarian nature which could hinder the achievement of the second goal of SDG for these developing countries. In my home country (Sudan), according to the  results of the 2015 Multiple Cluster Survey (MICS 2015), and despite the good progress in some indicators, Sudan will not meet the targets of the MDGs and there are some Key challenging issues are such as Decrease in measles immunization coverage and high prevalence of diarrhea (Khartoum State has the highest diarrhea prevalence: more than 2 in 5 children), stagnant improvement in malnutrition, Limited use of both improved water sources and improved sanitation, out of school children, Prevalence of violence against children, orphans, FGM among women, and early marriage and child mortality.

Rogers DHLIWAYO • Economics Advisor at UNDP

The United Republic of Tanzania is among the various countries now strategizing and working on devising the best effective ways to localize and implement the 2030 Agenda.  In Tanzania, efforts will be made to localize agenda 2013 by strategically mainstreaming the SDGs into national and local plans. 

 

The SDGs are coming into force at an opportune time coinciding with key medium term national planning activities, and this provides room for SDGs to be mainstreamed into national and local plans. In Mainland Tanzania, the Government is in the process of formulating the Second Five Year Development Plan 2016/17-2020/21 (FYDP II). The forthcoming plan which has the theme “Nurturing Industrialization for Economic Transformation and Human Development” will come into effect in July 2016. In Zanzibar, the Revolutionary Government of Zanzibar is also formulating the successor development strategy to MKUZA II which is anchored on structural transformation for human development.

 

The SDGs are therefore pertinent to the country’s development aspirations and should be mainstreamed in these development frameworks and the same applies to the unfinished business of the MDGs. It is therefore pertinent that the UN support this mainstreaming process including gap analysis of the data requirements that will be needed for monitoring progress on the SDGs. This support should entail going through the development frameworks and scrutinizing the 17 SDGs and associated 169 targets with a view to

 

(a)   Delineating potential high impact interventions in terms of having potential to producing the intended structural transformation with human development outcomes;

(b)   Delineating interventions with potential to have high  impact in realising multiple goals and targets,

(c)    Devising ways to appropriately and strategically prioritize as well as sequence interventions pertaining to SDGs into the development frameworks

(d)   Mainstreaming the SDGs in local and sectoral plans and budgets

(e)     Strengthening M&E systems and evidence based policy making

(f)     Suggesting coordinating institutional arrangements for SDGs implementation and monitoring

(g)   Suggesting alternative financing mechanisms of the SDGs

(h)   Scaling up some successful MAF interventions on MDG 1

 

See also link to the Localization of the Post 2015 Agenda in Tanzania Report below

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/21215576/Localizing%20P2015/Consultations%20Report%20on%20Localising%20the%20Post%202015%20Development%20Agenda%20in%20Tanzania%2018%207%202014.pdf

 

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/21215576/Localizing%20P2015/Consultations%20Report%20on%20Localising%20the%20Post%202015%20Development%20Agenda%20in%20Tanzania%2018%207%202014.doc

Dr. Abdalatif Hassan • Economic Analyst at UNDP from Sudan

Since 65% of the population in Sudan lives in rural agricultural areas which are mostly rain feed, the country should make big strides in countering Climate Change, otherwise people livelihood will be negatively affected and Sudan will not be able to meet the goals of the SDGs.

Mamadou Lamine (not verified)

We believe that in implementing it’s essential now that the United Nations continue to encourage governments to enhance and mobilize the customary or religious community leaders and other opinion leaders to appropriate the SDGs and contribute to public awareness so that they understand and take ownership. Community mobilization seems to be the key to the success of the implementation and achievement of SDGs.

BNEIJARA (not verified)

Bonjour Tous,

Tant que les populations des pays et les Gouvernement ne sont pas conscient qu’ils sont les premiers responsable de leur développement le monde ne va jamais changé et le fossé se creusera de plus. Si vous voyez les montants que les pays developpés investissent dans l'aide publique au developpement sans aucun guichet de financement pour la societé civile locale les interventions serviront d'autres nations et non les africains car ils ne sont pas encore mature. Prenons le cas de l'urgence au Sahel aujourd'hui chaque pays envoi ces ONG et elle deviennent recpiendaire des financement d'urgence parfois au detriment même des agence onusienne. L'emploi, la production; les finances rurales sont des rêves pour tout un continent qui n'arrive pas à decoller. Cette aujourd'hui attise l'accaparement des terres l'extremisme, les conflits etc...... On ne peut implementer que se que nous maitrisons si nous prenons le cas des engagement des gouvernant sur les 10% du budget sur l'agricultures  (Maputo) les aprtenaires auraient une tache importante de soutenir les efforts de la SC locale pour faire respecter les engagements.

BNEIJARA (not verified)

Bonjour

Si l’aide au développement a pour but de contribuer à une amélioration significative et durable des conditions de vie des populations, elle doit se traduit en premier lieu par l’assistance destinée à renforcer les capacités nationales et aux autres partenaires du pays afin qu’ils puissent concevoir et mettre en œuvre de manière efficace les programmes et les projets. Cela  doit obligatoirement passer par le renforcement des capacités permettant  aux institutions nationales d’améliorer la planification, la gestion et l’exécution des priorités nationales de développement pour une prise de décision en connaissance de cause et pour assurer un contrôle national important des plans de développement et de la gestion des ressources.

Le développement de ces capacités par le biais du renforcement des institutions nationales (OSC et communes) est indispensable à l’obtention de résultats durables en matière de développement.

Prenons un exemple concret la Mauritanie notre pays aujourd’hui ne dispose d’aucun mécanisme de financement de ces institutions nationales et locales.

Chaque partenaire développe son plan d’intervention et il est approuvé et exécuté sans aucune forme d’appropriation (les structures nationales sont tellement faibles). Nos partenaires étant plus forts que nous (OSC et communes) et notre Gouvernement deviennent facilement nos tuteurs ce qui posera à l’avenir des véritables contraintes à cela il faut ajouter les changements climatiques et l’augmentation de la population.

Kader Lawaly

Je pense que l'aide au développement aux payx pauvres est toujouirs la bienvenue, mais faut-il que cette aide soit bien utilisé pour le bien être de nos populations nécessiteuses. C'est pour cela qu'un changement de comportemet et de mentalité s'impose à tous et à toutes, notamment à nos Gouvernants. Donc il est plusque nécessaire d'oeuvrer pour le renforcement des capacités de nos dirigeants dans le domaine de la conscientisation et de la bonne Gouvernance en vue d'un plus grand engagement citoyen.

BNEIJARA (not verified)

Bonjour,

Les ODD ou le nouveau système de développement mondial est une nouvelle approche de qui dépendra l’avenir du monde.  A l’instar de tous processus de développement son efficacité dépendra de la : la Planification – la Programmation-Budgétisation et  le Suivi évaluation.  Il urge que le forum politique de haut niveau pour le développement durable des Nations Unies soit représenté dans chaque pays et institution régionale pour appuyer ce nouveau processus des ODD sous l’égide des nations unies qui on mandat de veiller sur la gouvernance mondiale, les NU doivent assumer leur responsabilité.

Les indicateurs de développement durable à l’horizon 2030 doivent être définis à l’échelle mondiale par le FPHN, c’est ainsi qu’il reviendra à chaque gouvernement appuyé par un représentant national du FPHN  de fixer ses propres indicateurs  nationaux pour répondre aux ambitions mondiales tout en tenant compte des spécificités nationales du pays. Chaque pays aura son plan de développement durable validé par le FPHN il mettra en place les structures nécessaires. Le FPHN national aura à veiller à l’alignement des partenaires encore sur le plan national de développement durable du pays garantissant ainsi l’efficacité de la coopération en matière de développement

Séverin SINDIZERA

In national implementation, It is very good for internationnal NGOs to carry out their projects in partnership with the indigenous peoples NGOs closely because if they work in direct with our group of Batwa it is problem. Their personnal burundians do not know the culture of our community Batwa for development of this indigenous peoples community and sometimes it is also difficult to know if the Batwa are satisfied of  the grant through the burundians who are not indigenous peoples.

Yvan Trésor (not verified)

Hello dear friends,

For me the SDGs can be integrated into national sustainable development policies and relevant programs, while preserving the policy space of countries to pursue national priorities based on systems and development programs already underway, we can agree that all UN member states do not need to achieve these 17 objectives on the same order of priority, this can be measured by the level of development of each country. For these  SDGs can be integrated into national policies without interfering in their policy areas, I believe we must rely on organizations, communities, associations and individuals who already works for the proper development of the welfare of their country providing support and a clear vision on the agenda in 2030 for sustainable development by conducting practical programs of sensitization.

For example in my country BURUNDI, we still torn between the need to move forward and fear of a political crisis that could result in a civil war, in which case the urgent need of the population is the return of good governance, freedom of expression and to be the return of civil and political refugees and the promotion of a free and peaceful society commit to the development of the country and no for its destruction.

The United Nations development system could support it based on his experience and influence by implementing activities and programs to restore harmony and respect between the people and the leaders, ensuring the commitment everyone to get involved in their own development and that of the agenda 2030 for sustainable development.

Séverin SINDIZERA

About implementation in national level for indigenous peoples, we need to set up the specific policies of this community in the governement and in the UN agencies. The second, the partnership I say is important between the indigenous peoples NGOs and international NGOs as the UN agencies to carry out together the action plan of SDGs. The copacity building in the mitigation, adaptation and technologic transfer  of climate change and in other areas of SDGs

Mustafa Bakuluzzaman (not verified)

SDG Implemenation in Civic participation and monitoring

Is SGD only target implementating institute Government? If not, Government is key actor of SDG implementor. If Government Key implementor, what is the monitoring and reporting system for universal? Who can validate the data?  What is the participatory monitoring mechanism. What are the engagement process and role of civil society organization in SDG like as CBO, NGO, INGO, corporate and private sector? In the past experienced of MDG, we have seen limited access of civil society and there is no systematic process. The MDG was mainly target in government. In the lesson learning we have not fully success of MDG.  The MDG main absence was people’s participation and ownership mechanism for ensuring performance, accountability & transparency and targeted success. The User did not know all targets, active role and their function. So most of the work did not sustainable and continue. We do not see same repaid learning think MDG to  SDG. The highlist of SDG will be

  • Community participation and ownership mechanism can ensure community, civil society participation, performance, accountability, transparency, sustainability and targeted success of SDG. 
  • Participation model for Government, NGO, private sector, civil society parcice can solve progress and sustainablilty. 
Priscilla (not verified)

The SDGs being global indicators should be entrenched to the Regional bodies of which the various National states are members. These National level policies should be based on the Regional priorities, as this ensures closer follow up of actions in place, by a central organ. The UN, in that it has Regional offices should ensure these offices are linked to the Regional political administrative boundaries to for coherence and systematization of issues affecting the Region. Thus a UN Regional office should be aligned to a political Regional office to maximize the gains. The national level priorities in as much as possible should be towards the Regional goals unless for very specific issues which have no repercussion to the Region. I take the case of Burundi, as it has being mentioned below, the said conflict has an effect in the whole Region, thus it’s not only a Burundi issue, but a Regional one too and at the end may have an effect to the Regional economic growth .

A Regional approach should be sought after to enable the member states, the various organizations work towards a common closer, near home,  goal. I give an example of the Horn of Africa regional IGAD Drought Disaster Resilience Sustainability Initiative (IDDRSI- http://resilience.igad.int/)  of Ending Drought Emergencies,  the  8 Member countries of IGAD, have the country programming papers for this initiative(thus all countries are working towards a common goal and though all at different levels , the MS are all aware of what is required). This same initiative is supported by donors and international development partners, under the umbrella of the Global Alliance for Action for Drought Resilience and Growth, which was formed following the IDDRSI. The Global Alliance brings together relief and development actors and resources to take joint action in support of effective country-led plans, with an emphasis on building resilience and promoting economic growth in the Horn of Africa.  Though not yet there, having organizations meet for a common purpose is way in the right direction, and a clear partnership build for a clear common purpose. A regional approach, endorsed by the member states ,by itself is a motivation in that the states are too required to provide their progress, but this calls for a strong regional monitoring system to limit only state’s self-reporting. This is where I see the Regional UN supported by the national UN institutions added value to ensure equitable process in implementation and of ensuring strong accountable systems, which review the progress within a given time.  Thank you

Melaku Geleta Wakjira (not verified)

National Implementation

Dear Moderator,

This is very useful platform to the UNECOSOC & UNDP to get global reflections towards the UN global support in the context of a ground and national realities. I believe, within these contexts, practical examples would be forwarded in order to address the subject under discussions. My commentary and advices are spinning around such perspectives. Thank you very much for this early stage chances and e-discussions which I think are critically important to influence the SDG’s 2016-2030 directions.    

A Point from Moderator: How can the SDGs be effectively mainstreamed into relevant national sustainable development policies and programmes, while preserving countries' policy space to pursue national priorities? How can the UN development system best support this?

 

  1. We have to be very clear on a common ground should exist between countries national plan and the UN SDG’s, i.e. how each countries define SDG’s from their national sustainable development goal perspective is critically important. It is clear that the SDG’s crafted with full participation UN member states. It is clear that the finally approved SDG’s endorsed by full participation of all member states. In order to effectively defining the roles of the UN in due courses of SDG implementation, we have to go out from businesses as usual approach. We have to ask key questions. Such as, what are the countries development models are focusing on? Growth model at work are dealing with? How relevant are they for SDG’s? Such questions have to be asked & get proper answers before go to SDG’s implementations. The UN country programs must come up with a transformative operational strategy as well to compliment the national plan. And the UN country programs should propose innovative solutions for unfinished MDG businesses and transformative, new social, economic and political direction compatible to the 15 years ambitious global development goal. Countries must be prepared to see 360° in to their national policies, strategies and detail action plans emanated from the growth and development model they owned at UN general assembly. I proceed to my comments from these angles. 

 

  • For example “Ending extreme poverty in all forms by 2030” is a very broad goal. This would be achieved mainly through having vibrant development model, inclusive by its approach, nondiscriminatory by its applications, multicultural by its nature. Above all, it has to address all strides of human life. It has to be very sensitive for invisible class formation related risks. As some studies indicate, the implementation of the MDG has affected some community groups. In some areas there were differences between the qualitative and quantitative achievements of the MDG. In fact the realty was varying from country to countries, from continent to continents. This time countries must work for the qualitative levels of achievements. We have to be very clear that there is a big difference between ending poverty and ending extreme poverty. The extreme poverty is all about the fulfillments of three basic needs, food, shelter and closing. It is the country’s development model that would determine the achievements of these needs. This is primarily an assignment for African and Asian continents. The challenges with these two continents are mainly related to absences of good governess, democratic governments, employment opportunities, corruptions and peace and security. A country under such stranded condition can’t deliver in qualitative term on SDG’s. One has to note that, the remaining 17 SDG’s are extensions for the achievements of “Ending extreme poverty in all forms by 2030”.   

 

  • If we look in to the second goal, it is all about “Ending hunger, achieve food security, improve nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture” This is very basic goal to transform a society to other levels of life. This goal is mainly focusing on a sector where countries GDP are coming from. Having sustainable agriculture is paramount importance to assure food security at country and household level. Because of so many structural and nonstructural problems, the agriculture sector in Africa, Latin America and Asia is becoming less resilient for seasonal shocks and disasters usually caused by climate changed. The climate change phenomenon is showing a continuum. Unless developed countries choose suitable development model, they will continue suffering from structure and nonstructural sectorial problems. The required emancipation for the sector fall on the shoulder of the type of economic model the country follows. The question must be raised is, are we in a visible food insecurity situation? Do our agriculture sector is resilient for climate change happening globally but affecting us locally? If the answers are yes for both fundamental questions, therefore, it is time for the countries (mainly for the developing & non industrial nations) to think about innovation and technology transfer need for the sector. This is basically important to bring both structural and nonstructural rapid changes. In addition, in the process of transiting from agrarian to industrial or agro industrial economy, the required human development must be considered. It is the quality of the human development packages can decide the yield of the sector. Therefore, ending hunger is the results of the balance between the supply and demand parts including the surplus production must be available at national level. In this case the purchasing power of the society has to be significantly improved in order to stimulate local markets and purchasing power of the society.  The multi-faceted achievements of the sector, such as improved food security, improved agriculture and improved nutrition are possible if the agriculture sector structural and nonstructural problems are well addressed under the growth and development model of that specific country.  Countries like Latin America, Africa and Asia must work hard to transform the sector to other levels of achievements. These nations must look back. They have to conduct qualitative assessments to see all achieved developments of the sector. This is the age of climate change. The sustainability of the agriculture sector by far becoming out of human hand.  Especially for developing countries the challenge is a triple fold. Hence, national level SDG’s implementation means for the sector is all about how to address the need for food security at household levels. In this regards, to this sector the issues of natural resources governance,  inclusive developments and land use & management policies are critical areas has to be addressed under 2016-2030 SDG’ implementation. The need for land for commercial faming versus problems related potentially poor community members, marginalization’s needs to be carefully consider. The national land use strategy is critically important in order to promote sustainable agriculture under agriculture, agro-pastoralist and pastoralist livelihood contexts. Especially this is recommendable for agrarian society who are getting more than 50% of GDP. 

 

  • The health sector was another broad focus area for the year 2016-2030 SDG.  It is widely believed that a society free from extreme poverty with sustainable income is usually had standard heath care services and insurances. Such thinking seems outdated & needs to be re-revised according the changing socio- economic situations of the world. In this case governments are primarily responsible bodies to provide there people a standard health care & health insurances services. Regardless of the society economic and social strata, citizens should be granted appropriate health care services. This must be taken as one aspect of citizenry rights. When we say standard health services, it has to cover all ranges of human life cycle, including pregnant mothers and children in their mother wombs too. The role the government must be focused on how to insure equity in the process of resource distribution and allocation to the sectors across all levels of societal classes. There is no ways for citizens to get standard and basic health services where the social and economic gaps are broaden year after year unless the government commitments are significantly enhanced during the SDG implementation years. As indicated under the overall SDG’s, “assuring good health is all about health life and promotion of well- being to all at all levels”. In this case, the goal will be achieved only through huge investment for the health sector. The investment would ranges from infrastructure expansions to human resource development including assuring high levels public participation in the fields of health extension and promotion.   

 

  • Similar to the above SDG’s there are detail and strategic areas require attentions for the education sector, countries should go beyond a mere language saying national education program coverage. This time the education policy of each UN member countries should focus on; Provision of quality education at primary, secondary, tertiary, college and vocational centers. The education policy must focus on how to go beyond national capacity building. The possibility to export trained and competent professionals to other nations with limited human capacity is new areas of opportunity to the sector. The education sector future strategy must focus on attaining professional Excellency; promote innovations and trans-boundary researches where finally investment in education sector would be considered as international business. This would bring the importance of transnational alliances and corporations to bring expected Excellency in the sector. If education policy and strategy working on this directions, issues of unemployment will significantly reduce. Because the global workforce and demand is still unbalanced. In addition to the above points, because of the absence of qualified and trained workforces everywhere in our planet, very simple challenges are sustaining without being solved. As a result the responsibility of this sector is becoming critical towards achieving the SDG’s during 2016-2030.

 

  • The education policy and strategy that we mentioned above has to be designed in a way the education system and the curriculum would empower women for a batter contribution to the global economy & aspired world. The attitude of seeing women empowerment as only for women benefit must be changed. We have to accept that they have critical contribution in changing our world, shaping the future & above all promoting the untapped skills and potentials for innovation and change. I most cases these were undermined for so many centuries. If we proud for what we have achieved to this date, i.e. in the absences  of women participation or biased gender understanding or  ascribed roles, this time we must explore the unexplored on for our betterment. The need for gender equity begin with the education system, grow to the employment and work sector, proceed to social, economic and political fields.

 

  • The issues of provisions of clean water and sanitation should not continue as an issue of simple service provisions. Under this goal each countries national plan should clearly indicate the meaning of access, affordability & quality water from practical and technical point of views. The goal for this sector for 2016-2030 should show to what extent governments are committed to assure the provision of access, affordable & quality water to their nations. Undisclosed reports from the past MDG’s shows that most of the developing countries were reporting achievements on access for water indiscriminately as for affordability and quality. However, that was not the realty. As this sector is a critical sector for achievements of most the SDG’s, governments should take appropriate measures to allocate significant investment for affordable & quality water access.  In addition, it is clear that the development pace of all nations may not be on the same page at same levels. In some cases, the development in the urban areas different from what has been achieved the rural areas. In some cases, the development in agriculture livelihood context exceed from what has been achieved in the pastoralists and agro-pastoralist contexts. Given these and similar other preconditions, government’s strategy and plan for affordable and quality water access must be free from systematic and unnoticed marginalization. On similar stances, the issues of access, affordability and reliability can be discussed under energy sector.  In the provisions of these basic services we should make sure that any parts of the nation are not discriminated and left behind from the national benefits. The governances system recommended for the remaining sectors should be considered for the water and energy sector too. Governments should notice that, unless a resource allocation & national and local level investments for the energy and water sector are based on the principles of resource equity, the life standard discrepancies between livelihoods, economic classes, and geographical locations will remain as it is throughout 2016-2030. 

 

  • We can summaries about the rest of SDG’s as follows. In general, the practical implementation of the ambitious SDG 2016-2030 is in the hands of world leader in general, each nation in particular. The commitment time is already passed. Now actions are started. Each country needs to be very honest about the future of its nation in particular and our world in general. There are times where we are sharing collective responsibilities. There are times where we are individually accountable for our actions. Both individual and collective accountabilities are applied interchangeably as required as needed in the entire implementation time of the SDG’s. Most of the developing nations are implementing their national development plan through FDI and development aids. The implementation of SDG’s requiring huge financing. This would be covered from own resources, development aids, loan from financial institutions and bilateral governments supports and sometimes from humanitarian assistances. If governments failed to properly plan appropriate national strategies, polices and plans, they obviously have planned to fail. In this regards the following critical points needs to be examined in the due courses of the implementation of SDG’s;

 

  1. All national plans, strategies and programs must be emanated from the democratic governance principles i.e. by the people, for the people & with the people. In other words, they have to respect human rights; human dignity ultimately should work for human development and decent life on our planet. 

 

  1. Corruption and good governances are the two most important elements to be considered for the success of SDG’s 2016-2030. If a country is well known for corruption no way to deliver on SDG’s. I am mentioning multifaceted types of corruption. Corruption is not only taking public resources, the most dangers one it will get power for  false report production usually  misleading  the others. Hence, in the absences of good governance, there is no guarantee if the resources allocated for SDG’s is used for the unintended purposes and again no way to check the credibility of the delivery. If a system based corruption existing, it is very difficult to fight it. Therefore, the importance of good governance is mandatory to deliver on SDG’s accountably, responsibly with shared responsibility and controlled system.

 

  1. Countries must be clear about the development model they have at national level. They have to make sure if their national development plan is in line with all UN declarations, principles, their national laws, sub-regional and continental agreements & protocols. They have to carefully refer these all international and national covenants while developing or adopting any development models. These international, national and regional documents are prepared to make sure collective and individual accountabilities are met. The documents are referring what must be done and do not. They are giving directions on how to realize a safe world or contribute towards safe world. The documents are human centered, nature centered, equity centered, standard centered, quality centered, principle centered, law centered, politics centered, culture centered, economy centered, protection centered, quality centered, peace and security centered etc. It talks about today, forewarn about tomorrow and envisage for the future.  The ultimate goal of SDG’s is” no one left behind”. If our development model serving some part of the nation and affecting the others, or deviate from the principles of inclusive development, no way to deliver on SDG’S. A sustainable development will examine all contexts. SDG’s are predestined to the principles of sustainability.                       

 

A point from Moderator: What are key areas for making progress on and building national and sub-national capacities for sustainable development, and how do they differ across country contexts (e.g. least developed countries, middle income countries, high-income countries, countries in situations of fragility etc.)? When and how can partnerships effectively contribute to capacity building and sustainable development?

  • One of the UN expert level supports to the member states is building of the national capacity of a member states for program execution. The implementation of the 17 SDG’s goals is requiring professional,   technical, financial, and thematic and program supports from the UN. To me by now all UN agencies should finish the preparation of specialty areas capacity building packages for SDG’s execution. If not yet, this must be prepared in the coming months or years. It is this support that keeps a balance between UN and member states in the entire SDG’s implementation life time. During the preparation of the capacity bundling packages, it would have been very good if all UN documents thoroughly referred to set standards, qualities, measurements, procedures, rules and regulations in line SDG’s thematic areas (declaration, standards, protocols, principles etc.). This would help to put UN at the position of a partner of choice. In additions, these will help to the UN to look beyond the conventional and traditional delivery realm.  As capacity building work is not one time work, through peer reviewing process, joint learning opportunities, there will be a room for periodical capacity gap identification to take a required action.     

 

A point from Moderator: What steps are necessary to ensure that all stakeholders, including the government, private sector and civil society can readily exchange information and experiences? How can "peer exchange" be established and nurtured?

  • As I already indicated above, the UN must go from traditional and conventional delivery focused program exclusion approach. In most cases the UN is shying away to comment the weakness of governments in development program implementation and other related business. It is widely heard that the UN would like to operate within safe zone. Some times reports are prepared to maintain such status quo. This tradition needs to be changed.
  • The governments are expecting the UN to serve as a “surrogate mother”. It is wrongly understood that UN is there to provide service with no right to question or to say no. This is totally against partnership principle for mutual accountability & for common goal.
  • The role of a private sector, civil society organizations engagements on UN-Government national program was significantly undermined in the past. It looks like UN and governments are playing on one side and the private sector & CSO are on the other side. 

 

  • In order to improve these challenges & for a better SDG’s implementation, the role and responsibilities of each sectors must be defined. The participation of the CSO and private sector is very decisive. Hence, to the interest of the implementation of SDG’s, to jointly monitor on its achievements and to periodically follow up on the  possible challenges , the establishments of peer reviewing platform is very important. Country offices should initiate the establishments of such platforms to start to exercise a joint SDG’s implementation monitoring in the coming years where they can capitalize and taping learning and experiences.       
Rita Luthra

Better information helps us to make better decisions. Investing in wireless Internet technology is the way forward to tackle maternal mortality and morbidity in the developing countries. E-learning is the most cost-effective way of transmitting evidence-based medicine to the developing countries. Imagine sitting in office or at home in USA or Europe, and by interacting with different cultures we will be able to understand different customs and learn to respect the diversity. Imagine students in developing countries and the United States simultaneously reviewing the same medical curriculum and learning from each other. This is e-learning at its best in an Internet classroom, and it is the goal of our initiative in Women’s Health and Development, title: http://www.WomensHealthSection.com; which was launched in collaboration with the United Nations is serving about 14 million subscribers in 227 countries and it is available in six official languages of the United Nations.

 

It is indeed my pleasure to submit to you UN Documents E/2015/NGO/2 and E/2014/NGO/53

Over the years, the United Nations, governments, civil societies, and individuals have put forth countless plans of action for reducing maternal mortality and morbidity. According to the World Health Organization, at least 1,600 women will die today from a complication of pregnancy and childbirth, most of them in developing countries. No technical or political approach – no matter how well intentioned – has ever conquered this enormous problem. What is needed is broader dissemination of medical knowledge. And Internet classrooms and initiatives such as WomensHealthSection.com, can help that goal.

 

Please join our efforts; we welcome everyone.

 

Thank you for this opportunity

Rita Luthra, MD

President

Women's Health and Education Center (WHEC)

NGO in Special Consultative Status with ECOSOC of the United Nations

Thura Aung • Executive Director at Radanar Ayar Association from Myanmar [Burma]

Most of country from developing world especially in Asia and the Pacific, my region still weak for the National level implementation and means. I may request and call to UN For strong support

Melaku Geleta Wakjira (not verified)

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: scope and implications

Melaku Geleta 

Dear Moderator,

This is very useful platform to the UNECOSOC & UNDP to get global reflections towards the UN global support in the context of a ground and national realities. I believe, within these contexts, practical examples would be forwarded in order to address the subject under discussions. My commentary and advices in the three pints flagged by you are spinning around such perspectives. Thank you very much for this early stage chances and e-discussions which I think are critically important to influence the SDG’s 2016-2030 directions;

  1. How can the guiding principle of 'Leave no one behind' be put into practice in implementing the 2030 Agenda in different development contexts (e.g. least developed countries, middle-income countries, high-income countries, fragile states etc.)?
  2. At the international level, what are challenges to ensuring policy coherence for sustainable development? What are some examples of best practice and/or who are the "trail blazers" leading the way to improved coherence?
  3. How could the UN development system provide coordinated and integrated support for the achievement of the 2030 Agenda?

 

  • Least developed countries: for these nations the “Leave no one behind” principle applied through working for inclusive development where the basic needs of the entire nations would to be fulfilled by taking forward the 17 SDG’s  and 169 specific activities. For these nations, having a development model striving for a middle income society must be a priority task. As we all know, under this category cheap labor and abundantly found NR is easily available. However, there is scarcity of foreign direct investments, most of the productions systems are yet at primitive level, technological advancement & opportunities for innovation are at infancy level, research and scientific discoveries are unthinkable, industrialization is not yet reached to the levels of full scale development and the economy is mainly dependent on foreign aid and high loan burden. In contrary to this, the available human and natural resources potential can be converted to economic use, to be tapped to improve the life of the multitudes. This shows that, the availability of a glimmer of hope for successful implementations of SDG’s during 2016-2030. What is required is, to have a clear vision working towards inclusive economic, political and social transformation, lead and guided by democratic political and good governance system. To this category, an inclusive development path is highly recommended because, the issues of marginalization, the rights of indigenous people, resource based conflicts, illicit economic/ financial flow, trans-boundary crimes, the impacts of climate change, population growth, radicalism and terrorism, absences of good governance and corruptions are mainly sourced from the absences of inclusive development approaches.  Unless these issues are properly captured in the due courses of utilizing the available NR and human resources,  followed by improving the life livelihoods of the nation, finally targeted to reach to middle income society , therefore, the vision for 2016-2030 'Leave no one behind' is inconceivable. The primary assignments of the least developing countries should be, first to be ready to provide inclusive and highly prioritized development plan to the nation, second get a national consent & endorsement of their people on the plan, third adhere to the democratic rules of law, fourth mobilize a required resources for the implementation, fifth do the implementation in accountable ways under established good governance system & monitoring & evaluation instruments.  

                

  • Middle-income countries: Take parts of  what has been said above from  least developed countries  and yet, within the middle income countries;

 

  • Improved and quality job creation is still what is required 

 

  • Improved & sustainable sources of income needed

 

  • Improved technology and full scale IT utilization for technological  advancement is very critical  

 

  • Improved,  resilient and diversified economic system must lead the pave to a rod of  high income countries is critical towards SDG’s implementations    

 

 

  • High-income countries: Everyone must be clear that no one can leave in isolated world without understanding the other corner of the globe. If we try, we are driving unsustainable boat may sink at some point or crash at some time. The developing worlds are very important to the existences of high income counties. In this case, the following points are highly recommended to this category;

 

  • It has to start with maintaining what has been achieved in the past and followed by having  a visionary plan for inclusive and sustainable world. There are issues becoming trans-national, trans-boundary, trans-economy, trans-culture, trans-religion that potentially threatening the sustainability of our planet including the high income society. The responsibility of the developed world is threefold compared to the reaming world in implementing SDG’s. This nation needs to improve their national population growth policy for sustainable national development. These nations are on missing of the middle age generation. There are two ways to sustain what has been done by their forefathers; improve their internal population growth policy or support the middle income society to have improved human development policy that strategically can be absorbed by the economy of high income society. Using the fully nurtured and practically proofed democratic system in the highly developed nations, the high income courtiers should support the development of the remaining world as they able to have secure and protected political and economic system. The more fragile stats we are having in the world, the less the international security existing. Improving this context would guarantee the strategic, economic and development needs & alliances of high income counties with other nations usually cross boundary alliances. The 17 SDG’s and 169 activities are effective instruments to practically exercising the above facts for the interest of both high & low-income countries.

 

  • Encourage international companies to go to the developing countries to promote foreign direct investments. This would strategically help the highly developed countries to decrease issues related to human trafficking, cross border crimes, illegal migrations, and terrorism. In additions, highly developed countries are equally responsible to decrease a climate change impacts in low income countries through supporting green economy initiatives. More than 50% of SDG’s agendas are crafted to address challenges directly related to climate change impacts which were primarily caused by industrialized world, keep suffering economies of poor world under chronic food and human security. The way the high income countries support the agenda should emanate from the global goal for having sustainable and safe world. Hence, the resources for investment, the strategic support expected for 2016-2030 SDG’s implementation must be injected from high income countries for mutual & global accountability.      

 

 

  • Fragile states; Most problems observed in fragile stats are resulted from failure to deliver on national security and needs for development. This failure is growing to another and a new religion-political ideology. Fundamentalism, radicalism, its associated impacts are becoming international concerns. Because of poor handling of the problems at early stages, so many crises flourished and affecting the world in many directions.  If we conduct a strategic impact inquiry in the fragile countries, we can see a critical association between politics, economy and religion (these have become inseparable ideologies). The SDG’s was announced where this agenda was reached at its pick in the failed states and already understood as global challenge. The fate of the implementation of the SDG’s is primarily falling on the shoulder of politics, tolerance, peace and security. The peace and security issues are still a problem for leaders of the fragile states to come together to have a national vision. Most of the failed state and potentially failed states leaders are motivated by attitudes of narrow nationalism & narrow economic interests. The national vision is secondary matter to them. They have failed to think inclusively. SDG’s begin with thinking’s of inclusive development with a motto saying “no one left behind” at the end of 2030. Inclusivity wouldn’t be achieved without national reconciliation. What can be done to implement SDG’s in the fragile states is that, the problems related to peace and security must get a full attention of the UN and its alliances. Once the fragile and potentially at margin fragile states leaders make a clear demarcation between ideologies, local interests and national interests, then, they will have a national vision which is a precondition to deliver on SDG’s. A practical role of the UN must be on assuring on how to bring stability through the participation of the local community and political vanguards of each failed & potentially failed states. But we should not forget that each year the number of countries on the borderlines failed sates is increasing. Unless the world able to manage the existing one, we shall have more fragile sates sooner or later. We are on the age easy communication of cross boundary crisis. We have a very a good lesson for the UN and it alliances to be taken as example. We all remember the Arab spring invaded so many countries in a very few months. All involved national are sharing certain things in common. We know what happing across those countries. Similarly, such cross country crisis could ignite any time in any parts of the world that could potentially invade so many countries. Therefore, in a context of fragile states, the chance for the successful SDG’s 2016-2030 implementation is based on delivering on required political reforms followed by provision of inclusive political and economic policies.

 Melaku Geleta Wakjira

UNDP Ethiopia 

DRR & LR Program Coordinator 

Lanre Rotimi (not verified)

Tried unsuccessfully to make posts yesterday. Encouraged to try again today because we recieved notification on posts of others. It is our hope that the Technical Problem is resolved abd this Post is published.

We observe that this Platform has 2 E-discussion Facilitators from Canada and Brazil - both of whom are very active in driving discussions. This is very commendable and ought to be replicated on the other 2 Platforms where there is at present no contribution from any E-discussion Facilitator.

The Key points we tried to make yesterday were on need for Policy Makers and Decision Makers on UN Member States (over 300), UN System including WBG and IMF and MGoS sided to recognize that they have agreed on the “what” in regard to partnership and share common interests and goals, yet the details on “how” still need to be developed, that many UN Events scheduled specifically to find correct answers to these "how" questions end up finding answer to"what" questions".

Is this Platform really serious about making significant contribution to answer to "how" questions? Can the E-discussion Facilitators from Canada and Brazil each assure Participants that this in not about "talking and thinking" but about "action and accomplishment" and that all "good ideas and pertinent suggestions" harvested from this E-discussion will be presented to all concerned Policy Makers and Decision Makers on UN Member States 9over 300), UN System including WBG and IMF and MGoS sides for Full Implementation with effective Monitoring and Evaluation of this Implementation?

Lanre Rotimi (not verified)

It is a puzzle none of the E-discussion Facilitators from Brazil and Canada, or indeed any participant has responded to issues raised in last Post. Please find attached herewith a recent Focused Points Paper elaborating on points made. Can Facilitators and Participants help give wide dissemination to Policy Makers and Decision Makers on UN Member States, UN System including WBG and IMF and MGoS sides?

Is there anyone willing and able to pick up the gauntlet and engage us in constructive discussion on way forward in Global Interest?

Melaku Geleta Wakjira (not verified)

Mainstreaming SDG’s within national sustainable development policiesBy Melaku Geleta Wakjira
DRR-LR program coordinator
UNDP Ethiopia
melaku_geleta@hotmail.com
Dear Moderator, on top of what has been shared last weeks, I suggest the following points to be considered to refine more on the issues & the discussions towards suggesting the “how” question in the SDG’s mainstreaming process within countries national sustainable development polices.
1. One of the critical challenges for SDG’s implementations is the basic and fundamental difference between countries in all aspects. Even though one of the SDG’s designed to work against this problem, i.e. to narrow a gap, this may not be simple task as we think for the following reasons.

• Countries are living in different political systems and zones
• Countries are pursuing different growth and development ideologies
• Countries are dependent on different national priorities
• Countries have different economic and social standards best fit to the achieved and aspired economic growth and development

2. The other critical challenge for SDG’s implementation is the type of plans countries having this day, i.e. the development and growth plans are differ from countries to countries 1. By the type of the plan, 2. By duration of the plan 3. By issues and priorities to be addressed in the plan 4. By goal of the plan.

3. The commonalties and differences among countries are diversified; hence, we have to check if the followings are fully or partially available within a specific country to think of” how “to mainstream SDG’s within the national plans & policies. NOTE: Some countries have at least 1 national roadmap or perspective plan or and indicative plan or master plan for which all are operating beyond 10 years and above implementation time. Within these contexts, again so many irregularities and inconsistencies are exist; however, to respond to the question “how” in general, we can do the mainstreaming work at least in areas identified as bellow. It is good to examine the SDG’s, targets and key indicators across areas summarized under this part.
• What types of perspective plan 15-20 years, what development plan 3-7 years are available (we have to make sure if the perspective plan is available, if so, to know to what extent the plan have accommodated elements of SDG’s is very priority; if not think how to bring the SDG’s to the scene and think about mainstreaming. Then proceed to continue the mainstreaming issues with the development plan usually covers 3-7 years
• What social security policy available for sustainable income and decent life, to what extent these are based on the principles of inclusive development, what elements of SDG’s can be mainstreamed in the coming 15 years?
• What social service policy available? to what extent the rule of equity and equality are pinpointed in the policy? What elements of SDG’s can be mainstreamed in the coming 15 years? Within this streamline
• Economic policy (for trade, industry, tourism) do we have a chance to think of SDG’s mainstreaming?
• Infrastructure development policy; etc.
• Natural resource development and protection policy; etc.
• Land use and land management policy; etc.
• Green economy policy/ green growth policy; etc.
• Cultural policy; etc.
• Energy policy; etc.
• Rural development policy; etc.
• Urban development policy; etc.
• National security & foreign policy; etc.
• Political system & good governance policy; etc.
• Political and economic decentralization policy; etc.

Dr. Abdulghany Mohamed • from Canada

Dear Participants,

Thanks for your contributions and my appreciation to the facilitators. I have greatly benefitted from your invaluable postings to date.

I would like to suggest that, in order to mainstream and promote national implementation(s) of the SDGs as well as to ensure effective program/project follow-up and reviews, it is imperative that national conversations be accorded serious consideration. It is my humble opinion that sustained, robust, constructive, broad and grassroots-based involvement and dialogue within and across communities is critical in enabling disparate stakeholders to articulate goals, provide clear direction, foster buy-in and project ownership, engender empowerment, build momentum, garner new ideas, exchange/transfer of knowledge and best practices, help harness collective strengths as well as provide space to air/voice concerns; and hence provide the means for social cohesion and nation building. Moreover, national conversations are also crucial in program/project review and monitoring. The question then is: how can communities/nations etc. launch and sustain the proposed dialogues?

Briefly, I suggest that a variety of approaches and methods will be required as deemed appropriate within different cultural contexts. For instance, conversations about the SDGs could be fostered in: (a) youths/students activities (e.g., in extra-curricular activities including debating clubs, drama clubs, singing choirs, essay and poster competitions, etc.), (b) the incorporation of SDG implementation in local/national celebrations/festivals, (c) the meaningful involvement/engagement of artists (fine and performing arts), and (d) providing enhanced impetus for the role of mass media and social media in fostering development activities (locally, nationally and regionally). These and many other approaches/techniques could be employed to foster conversations and stakeholder engagement at multiple levels/domains. To be sure, support and capacity building for these endeavours (from local, national and global champions) would be crucial in ensuring their success.

In short, conversations at local, sub-national, national, regional and international levels could potentially help to bring together citizens (as well as citizens with their respective leaders) to talk about the SDGs and exchange experiences. These dialogues, I believe, would not only support endeavours to meet the information, communication and networking needs of various stakeholders, they could also serve as drivers of both social and economic/business creativity and innovation which are critical in implementing the SDGs. Conversely, failure to collectively think and converse/dialogue about the SDGs will most likely leave communities and stakeholder ill-prepared and handicapped in implementing the SDGs.

Thanks and looking forward to your reactions and contributions.

Cheers,

Dr. Abdulghany  Mohamed

Priscilla (not verified)

Thank you Dr Mohammed , other areas that could be focused on are;  reaching the parliamentarians, who are  key policy and decision makers at national level. First enabling them appreciate the 17 goals and have them debate on them for a common understanding  and how each of the goals could be achieved. The parliamentary debates are of national interest and thus arouse  discussions  outside the parliament. If the top leaders of any society get engaged , then SDGs implementation is likely to have the necessary resources to guide and of facilitation of the whole process of implementation. UN can play a role in engaging the local and National policy makers and organizations to ensure the SDGs implementation process is discussed at this levels to ensure , 1/ the purpose of SDGs is clear to the citizens, 2nd a participatory approach is sought after in its implementation and last to try and keep the focus on the subject. National UNDP online discussions such as this one, would enable to keep the fire burning , including a reach  to the religious institutions who are key partners in development in most of the states as they command a huge population too. Mass media , in particular radio programs, in kenya, and i believe in most of the countries we have radio focused programs on development , which discuss particular topics, and allow discussion with the listeners through facilitation of the programs by experts, this too would enable wider engagement. The private sector, could get engaged into this promotion through their corporate  social responsibility, and if all have one common vision then its likely to reach a wider population   Thank you. Priscilla

Priscilla (not verified)

Dear moderator, Priscilla and other colleagues I support all recommendations made by Priscilla.  Just to recall a part of her message " reaching the parliamentarians, who are  key policy and decision makers at national level."  But not without a strong mobilization for society awareness and debates, for their organized support for renewal and coherence of legal frameworks which are either new propositions or already established ones which creates limitations for policy coherence to the 17 goals. I would reinforce this double action of Parliaments and Society awareness, engagement and participatory monitoring for accountability by the governmental tiers (national and subnational), financial agents and entrepreneurs/business with an illustration of the national mobilization of the Federal Public Ministry (Ministerio Publico Federal) in Brazil which analysed the current gaps in Brazilian legislation that have dismantled actions against corruption.  The campaign 10 Medidas de Combate à Corrupção (10 Measures against Corruption) is a package of 10 different and complementary proposals for changes aiming updating Brazilian constitutional and infra-constitutional legal frameworks against corruption.  However, the Legislative Authority (National Congress) has not moved for their approval (just a small group of parliamentaries).  Then the way to involve legislative support was to collect the required minimum number of electors (around 1,5 million) to sign the petition with the 10 measures.  The campaign started in mid 2015 and at the moment we have reached more than the minimum number (around 1,6 million signatures) in all 27 provinces.  See more at http://www.dezmedidas.mpf.mp.br/ So, what I want to reinforce is we need to understand that Parliaments in weak democracies are not fairly representatives of all segments of society, but mostly moved by economic dimension (either in a public perspective or, in corruption, in a very much private and personal perspective for monetary gains). Thus, the ODS 16 and ODS 17 need to be seen as twins for turning the other ODS as part of the institutional conditions of the Agenda 2030, at least in a 'national' zone territory of countries. But as there are other layers over countries (multilateral agreements, global treaties), as moderators have mentioned in the report of the second week of discussion, we need Vertical, Horizontal and, I would add a bit more of pepper in it, a Time Span policy coherence (short, medium and long term goals and targets) on treaties, guidelines, pluriannual plans, programs, financial projects, and so on. Kind Regards Patricia Almeida Ashley www.intsr.uff.br and www.ecopoliticas.uff.br Em 16/03/2016 02:51, notification@unteamworks.org escreveu:

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World We Want 2030

Posted on: E-discussion Facilitator New comment on Discussion National Implementation by Priscilla DRR Programme Officer from Kenya : Thank you Dr Mohammed , other

Thank you Dr Mohammed , other areas that could be focused on are;  reaching the parliamentarians, who are  key policy and decision makers at national level. First enabling them appreciate the 17 goals and have them debate on them for a common understanding  and how each of the goals could be achieved. The parliamentary debates are of national interest and thus arouse  discussions  outside the parliament. If the top leaders of any society get engaged , then SDGs implementation is likely to have the necessary resources to guide and of facilitation of the whole process of implementation. UN can play a role in engaging the local and National policy makers and organizations to ensure the SDGs implementation process is discussed at this levels to ensure , 1/ the purpose of SDGs is clear to the citizens, 2nd a participatory approach is sought after in its implementation and last to try and keep the focus on the subject. National UNDP online discussions such as this one, would enable to keep the fire burning , including a reach  to the religious institutions who are key partners in development in most of the states as they command a huge population too. Mass media , in particular radio programs, in kenya, and i believe in most of the countries we have radio focused programs on development , which discuss particular topics, and allow discussion with the listeners through facilitation of the programs by expert! s, this too would enable wider engagement. The private sector, could get engaged into this promotion through their corporate  social responsibility, and if all have one common vision then its likely to reach a wider population   Thank you. Priscilla

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Dr. Abdulghany Mohamed • from Canada

Dear Priscilla,

Thanks for your comment. I couldn’t agree more. Parliamentarians have a critical role in ensuring that the SDGs are mainstreamed in public policies and discourse as well as providing an essential link between the legislatures and citizens in their respective constituencies. I also concur that the private sector policies, practices and support are crucial in implementing the SDGs as deliberations in corporate board rooms get translated into concrete projects/programs on the ground.  

Again thank you very much for your contributions in this e-discussion.

With kind regards,

Dr. Abdulghany Mohamed

Melaku Geleta Wakjira (not verified)

Holistic to specific corruption fighting approach &strategy

By Melaku Geleta

DRR & LR Program Coordinator

UNDP Ethiopia  

Dear facilitator and Akaaash thank you very much for bringing  the issues of corruption to the seen which in fact we all have raised in our past weeks discussions at comprehensive level . I think we need to do more probing on this to deal with issues of corruption. We need to sharpen our understanding on the subject for organized and effective solutions. It is with this understanding that I am taking some steps to elaborate the challenge and a remedial action.

General Recommendation to UN and its alliances to stop corruption 2016-2030: If we are very determine to fight corruption; I suggest the UN should think as early as possible (before SDG’s implementation) on how to bring additional UN structure such as UN corruption court with global and international mandate. UN must define international bill for corruption, set international standard to measure its international impacts, code of conduct for its management, above all needs to set international accountability measures and check and balance system between governments, public sectors, private sectors , CSO’s and the UN that must be approved by UN general assembly. To me corruption is not less than genocide, international war crime, etc. I suggest this because, corrupters are taking public resources, smuggling national resources to the third country, destroy national interests & natural resources for narrow and private needs, they use this resources for further human right abuses, where women are dying needs of clean and potable water, where children are dying of malnutrition, where thousands are choosing less dignified life standard because of unemployment, poor governances. It causes civil unrest. Hence UN should think of new structure, International corruption court. We need the general assembly to be active in these areas.

In addition to what I have recommended above, the UN should provide a chance to the international organizations or CSO’s to have a role that they can play beyond conventional consultation process. As to me, these organizations should be given a defined role to fight corruption internationally and globally. I am sure this will bring additional power to the UN to stop corruption in the coming years, SDG’s 2016-2013.The system and a framework that applied on how the CSO’s play a role needs to be defined and approved by UN general assembly. The structure suggested should go down to UN country offices, but must be deigned on how to compliment the international corruption court role at global level including corruption reporting systems.

By Melaku Geleta

DRR & LR Program Coordinator

UNDP Ethiopia  

Priscilla (not verified)

Thank you  Melaku, thank you for reiterating the corruption issue, but I think before we even add an additional strucutre such as the  International corruption court level, can we first ensure our house is in order! By this I mean ensuring we have the appropriate structures and systems to monitor achievements. I stand to be corrected but most of the international frameworks such as the SDGs, while they are endorsed by a number if not all the national states, the monitoring of progress is usually weak and limited to the member states monitoring themselves. Do we have any formed monitoring structure for the SDGs at the international/Regional level? Who reviews the various SDGs reports from the states, any system in place to support in the set-up of the various actions that the countries will come up with? I think strengthening of the mechanisms and putting up accountability systems at every level will diminish this evil of corruption, corruption thrives due to the weak systems in place which cannot even defend or strongly give evidence of any alleged corruption case, thus why in most countries corruption cases go unpunished and are rarely proven. Could UNDP, being represented in I presume most of the countries that endorsed the SDGs and 2nd on their role on aspects of governance support this process of attaining the development goals through supporting the accountability systems, this would ensure the goals and the very good visions put by the countries are not lost due to misuse of the resources provided. How do we even account for endless meetings/planning workshops/travels yet nothing tangible is seen apart from the lists of sitting allowances/perdiems?  May be on a positive note is too have a UN body review the implementation of all the previous global frameworks, to understand where actual gaps were in regards to strutures/systems that were in place to follow up on achievement, this could be used to strengthen the implementation of SDGs, most we think its inadequate financial resources but with corruption this may not even be the case?  Thank you. Priscilla

BNEIJARA (not verified)

Bonjour,Lees processus nationauxd’élaboration de de stratégie de mise en œuvre des Objectifs de développementdurable (Odd) doivent se faire dans le cadre du plan d’actions prioritaires despays. Toutes les partiesprenantes engagées dans le développement du pays doivent établir  une feuille de route, dans une démarcheparticipative et inclusive, pour élaborer une stratégie de suivi etd’évaluation  de la mise en œuvre des Odd..    Les échanges entre les acteurs engagés dans cesprocessus doivent  porté sur plusieurspoints. Parmi lesquels figure au premier rang la définition d’un cadreinstitutionnel et de redevabilité rigoureux et participatif pour le pilotageefficace des Odd intégrant le cadre harmonisé de suivi-évaluation despolitiques publiques. Ainsi que la mise en place d’un système de suivipermanent et informatisé des Odd aux niveaux local, sectoriel et national surla base d’un noyau d’indicateurs pertinents, comparables, désagrégeables pourplus d’inclusion sociale. Le renforcement des capacités des acteurs(gouvernement, élus locaux, secteur privé et société civile) dans la mise enœuvre des Odd est nécessaire. Cesacteurs ont aussi à vulgariser les Odd pour garantir une appropriation pluslarge des nouveaux enjeux par toutes les couches de la population.   17/03/2016 10:46 GMT + 00: 00 < notification@unteamworks.org > :

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Posté le: E-discussion Facilitateur Nouveau commentaire sur Discussion nationale mise en œuvre par Priscilla : Je vous remercie Melaku, je vous remercie

Merci Melaku, je vous remercie d'avoir rappelé la question de la corruption, mais je pense avant que nous ajoutons même une strucutre supplémentaires tels que le niveau international du tribunal de la corruption, pouvons - nous assurer d' abord notre maison est en ordre! Par cela , je veux dire nous assurer que nous avons les structures et systèmes appropriés pour surveiller les réalisations. Je me tiens à corriger , mais la plupart des cadres internationaux tels que les ODD, alors qu'ils sont approuvés par un certain nombre , sinon tous les Etats nationaux, la surveillance des progres! s est généralement faible et limitée aux Etats membres eux-mêmes de surveillance. Avons-nous une structure de suivi formé pour les ODD au niveau international / régional? Qui examine les différents ODD rapports des États, tout système en place pour aider à la mise en place des différentes actions que les pays venir avec? Je pense que le renforcement des mécanismes et de mettre en place des systèmes de reddition de comptes à tous les niveaux diminueront ce mal de la corruption, la corruption se développe en raison des systèmes faibles en place qui ne peut même pas défendre ou donner fortement preuve d'un cas présumé de corruption, ainsi pourquoi dans la plupart des pays , la corruption les cas restent impunis et sont rarement prouvés. Pourrait PNUD, étant représenté dans je suppose la plupart des pays qui ont adopté la ODD et 2 ème de leur rôle sur les aspects de soutien à la gouvernance de ce processus de réalisation des objectifs de développement en soutenant les systèmes de reddition de comptes, cela permettrait d' assurer les objectifs et les très bonnes visions mis par le comte! ries ne sont pas perdues en raison d' une mauvaise utilisation des ressources fournies. Comment pouvons-nous compte , même pour les ateliers sans fin réunions / planification / voyages encore rien de tangible est vu en dehors des listes de séance allocations / perdiems? Peut - être sur une note positive est trop avoir examiner un organe de l' ONU la mise en œuvre de tous les cadres mondiaux précédents, pour comprendre où les écarts réels étaient en ce qui concerne strutures / systèmes qui étaient en place pour assurer le suivi sur les résultats, ce qui pourrait être utilisé pour renforcer la mise en œuvre des ODD, plus nous pensons que ses ressources financières insuffisantes , mais la corruption cela peut même pas être le cas? Je vous remercie. Priscilla

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Bonjour;Les processus nationauxd’élaboration de de stratégie de mise en œuvre des Objectifs de développementdurable (Odd) doivent se faire dans le cadre du plan d’actions prioritaires despays. Toutes les partiesprenantes engagées dans le développement du pays doivent établir  une feuille de route, dans une démarcheparticipative et inclusive, pour élaborer une stratégie de suivi etd’évaluation  de la mise en œuvre des Odd..    Les échanges entre les acteurs engagés dans cesprocessus doivent  porté sur plusieurspoints. Parmi lesquels figure au premier rang la définition d’un cadreinstitutionnel et de redevabilité rigoureux et participatif pour le pilotageefficace des Odd intégrant le cadre harmonisé de suivi-évaluation despolitiques publiques. Ainsi que la mise en place d’un système de suivipermanent et informatisé des Odd aux niveaux local, sectoriel et national surla base d’un noyau d’indicateurs pertinents, comparables, désagrégeables pourplus d’inclusion sociale. Le renforcement des capacités des acteurs(gouvernement, élus locaux, secteur privé et société civile) dans la mise enœuvre des Odd est nécessaire. Cesacteurs ont aussi à vulgariser les Odd pour garantir une appropriation pluslarge des nouveaux enjeux par toutes les couches de la population.   L'engagement du SNU est un gage de réussite de ces processus.-- Président ONG ADIG Tel:  0022245344811Cell: 0022246405769       00022236388360        0022222405769     

Priscilla (not verified)

Dear Priscilla, colleagues and moderators, Again I express convergence of ideas written by Priscilla with those I take for my own analysis, remarking  on "endless meetings/planning workshops/travels yet nothing tangible is seen apart from the lists of sitting allowances/perdiems". Indeed, one gap in the Agenda 2030 is not an explicit concept that sustainable development is much more than social, economic and environmental dimensions.  Before the High Level Political Forum, when the Comission for Sustainable Development were still a voice for thoughts on sustainable development concept and indicators, the Institutional Dimension was part of the concept of sustainable development.  The 17 Goals in the Agenda 2030, apart from being totally imbricated and co-dependent among themselves (see DESA Working Paper 141 entitled "Towards Integration at Last? The Sustainable Development Goals as a Network of Targets", written by David Le Blanc, from United Nations, Division for Sustainable Development) are not conceived hierarchically, but indeed they are when we turn thoughts on how to implement them. The term 'tripple bottom line' was adopted by United Nations for easy communication, transposed from business management literature, which is a kind of a boundary institution managed by capital owners and, at the most debt owners) in which the idea of Leadership is the highest level of possibility of change.  However, when we turn to society, we cannot see it as a business organization calling for leaderships, but in fact calling for the Institutional Dimension of sustainable development which means governance, policy coherence, funding, education, social participation and updated legal and juridical frameworks. So, Priscilla, remember that the Agenda 2030 is non-binding global agreement, which means voluntary, let it be, let it happens.  On the contrary, Transpacific Partnership and other multilateral trade agreements, apart from other global trade and investment agreements are binding agreements.  When it comes for the question 'Where the money comes from?' in global concentration of wealth reinforced by those binding agreements, facing non-binding climate, environmental and social beautiful inspiring global agreements, the answer is obvious: the money shall come from capital owners and capital donors. Thus, why we insist in dreaming The World we Want?  Some people probably because of a chance of funding for "endless meetings/planning workshops/travels yet nothing tangible is seen apart from the lists of sitting allowances/perdiems".  I have long opted out from this 'carrot' over academia. And so I keep on hoping that the hearts are beating stronger because The World we Want is bringing the hearts, minds and, hopefully HANDS together. Thank you UNDP and ECOSOC for this chance of bringing voices in this typing space.  Hopefully UNDP, ECOSOC will give steps further into MOOCS, WEBINARS as to prevent us becoming dependent on air tickets, per diems and beautiful dressings and cocktails to simulate. If at least we could create better institutional conditions for policy coherence towards sustainable development goals, in local, provincial, national, international and global agreements and treaties, that is a huge step for convergence in criteria for funding and financing sustainability. Kind Regards Patricia Almeida Ashley Em 17/03/2016 07:46, notification@unteamworks.org escreveu:

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Posted on: E-discussion Facilitator New comment on Discussion National Implementation by Priscilla : Thank you  Melaku, thank you

Thank you  Melaku, thank you for reiterating the corruption issue, but I think before we even add an additional strucutre such as the  International corruption court level, can we first ensure our house is in order! By this I mean ensuring we have the appropriate structures and systems to monitor achievements. I stand to be corrected but most of the international frameworks such as the SDGs, while they are endorsed by a number if not all the national states, the monitoring of progress is usually weak and limited to the member states monitoring themselves. Do we have any formed monitoring structure for the SDGs at the international/Regional level? Who reviews the various SDGs reports from the states, any system in place to support in the set-up of the various actions that the countries will come up with? I think strengthening of the mechanisms and putting up accountability systems at every level will diminish this evil of corruption, corruption thrives due to the weak systems in place which cannot even defend or strongly give evidence of any alleged corruption case, thus why in most countries corruption cases go unpunished and are rarely proven. Could UNDP, being represented in I presume most of the countries that endorsed the SDGs and 2nd on their role on aspects of governance support this process of attaining the development goals through supporting the accountability systems, this would ensure the goals and the very good visions put ! by the countries are not lost due to misuse of the resources provided. How do we even account for endless meetings/planning workshops/travels yet nothing tangible is seen apart from the lists of sitting allowances/perdiems?  May be on a positive note is too have a UN body review the implementation of all the previous global frameworks, to understand where actual gaps were in regards to strutures/systems that were in place to follow up on achievement, this could be used to strengthen the implementation of SDGs, most we think its inadequate financial resources but with corruption this may not even be the case?  Thank you. Priscilla

17 Mar 2016 [ read more ] [ reply ]

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Melaku Geleta Wakjira (not verified)

The Role of the UN in SDG’s mainstreaming both at policy and implementation level.

By: Melaku Geleta

DRR & LR Program Coordinator

UNDP Ethiopia              

Dear moderator, thank you for a request for elaborations. I think, as UN we have been giving a technical supports in the past for so many years. But this time, the support from the UN to countries must go beyond giving a support for what all proposed by governments. The technical support from the UN agencies, especially in policy development and SDG’s mainstreaming should be a challenging, a facilitative and follow a mutual accountable process. I suggest these approaches because; sometimes the development policies are derived by ‘individual’s ambitions” regardless of addressing the national context, reality or priorities for which the UN must be equally accountable. Meager resources are utilized for not national priority interventions or less strategic agendas. We have to make a clear demarcation between “commercial & needy” agendas.  There are some observation that, countries with less human and financial resources are found to be the most extravagant one in using national resources for less priority programs, because of its commercial advantage regardless of its neediness. In addition to UNDAF development sessions, I suggest, the UN country offices must play a pivotal role and initiate joint priority setting sessions, through giving technical support in the areas of commissioning big researches, inviting research institutions to step in as a solution providers, injecting and trade meaningful international cooperation’s, informed policy development practices, in depth problem analysis, through giving sharpened recommendations etc. While countries prepare development policies, or implement policies, this must be considered from SDG’s mainstreaming angle. If the UN failed to provide such technical support to the countries, it is clear that less relevant policies will continue to be implemented to heal the symptom without addressing the root causes, which is not the case of SDG’s 2016-2030.

On top of the upper policy level engagements, depends up on the specific country structures, it is wise to cascade down to the subnational, regional or sub regional level the notion behind SDG’s mainstreaming. Once the policy level task is properly managed, the UN support at implementation level must be well defined and prepared as parts of SDG’s implementation and mainstreaming packages. I believe the UN could delivery on the later one as well because there are at least 1 and more than 1 UN agencies responsible to give a technical support to one of the 17 SDG’s. In these contexts, the SDG’s mainstreaming challenges would be solved at two levels (at policy and implementation levels). For the later one the implementation package is critically important to assure to what extend the SDG’s are mainstreamed.

Melaku Geleta

DRR & LR Program Coordinator

UNDP Ethiopia              

            

 

 

BNEIJARA (not verified)

Bonjour,

Les enseignements tirés de ces échanges  nous ont permis de réfléchir ensemble à la mise en œuvre des ODD au niveau national. Il ressort des contributions  que la réalisation de ces objectifs tient fondamentalement de l’action coordonnée des Gouvernements, du secteur privé et de la Société civile à traduire ces ODD dans ces actions concrètes et des politiques publiques claires et efficaces qui passeront par l’élaboration de feuilles de route nationales. Il revient aux décideurs et aux planificateurs à l’échelle nationale et locale d’intégrer les ODD dans leurs stratégies et documents de planification. Il faut un renforcement de capacité des acteurs leur permettant l’intégration de  tous les aspects pertinents pour une meilleure opérationnalisation des ODD à savoir : l’appropriation des objectifs, des accords qui y sont liés, des outils de gestion de la durabilité et les techniques et méthodes d’alignement des ODD aux politiques nationales et sectorielles. Cela loin des disputes, des discussions  passant rapidement à l’action.

Abiodun Ogundipe (not verified)

Dear Moderator, I beleive in inter_relationship. UN should set  a standard for all nations to meet. if there is a standard being set up. Monitoring and Evaluation can the then come in by the UN.

Alka BHATIA • Economics Advisor at UNDP

Appreciate the richness of ideas that have come through in this process. The discussion forum is timely as it allows learning and exchange of ideas.

In hindsight the process of arriving at an agreement on the SDGs looks relatively straightforward as we look to roll out the implementation phase! There is a universal acknowledgement of the basic principles of coordination, multi-sectorality and good governance that are critical for successful implementation; however the challenge lies in promoting a common understanding of the larger objective and the roles for different stakeholders at all levels: the need for individual and collective ownership. Above all ensuring the transparency and accountability necessary in the process to stay on course. What is perhaps a key issue then is to get a common understanding and agreement that the involvement of people from the grassroots, up and across, needs to be promoted. Some examples have already been provided that where such an involvement takes place success in achieving goals is guaranteed. The UN system needs to and is in a position to catalyze this process working with different stakeholders.

Mainstreaming the SDGs into national development plans and integrating them also at the sub-national level requires an intensive process of prioritisation and in my view sequencing. This is particularly true in LDCs with limited resources, both human and capital. Various tools are available for this in addition to guidance on vertical and horizontal coherence of policy frameworks. This is not new and is the classic approach to planning for sustainable development; however in most cases we have had limited success as evidenced in the uneven progress on the MDGs, possibly due to inadequate practice of these fundamental principles. Further, to achieve appropriate mainstreaming, due diligence on priority setting is required: selecting indicators that together will facilitate achievement of a few priority goals needs to be a focused evidence based process rather than just being a broad based consultative process.  A ‘systems thinking’ approach is necessary to achieve the integrated goals for sustainable and enduring development. There is need for improved synchronization in planning processes, both vertical and horizontal as well as rationalization of implementing structures at the national and sub national levels.

The foregoing also requires strong leadership, not only at the national and sub national level but also within the UN and within the private sector and civil society, including academia. In addition, we need to also have champions, who will guide, lead and exemplify multi-sectorality and integrated approaches that will leave no one behind. 

Alka BHATIA • Economics Advisor at UNDP

Dear Alka BHATIA Economics Advisor, moderators and colleagues I signed all paragraphs you wrote in your comments. Brilliant synthesis of our shared concerns in this e-discussion and clearly appropriate recommendations. Kind Regards Patricia Almeida Ashley www.intsr.uff.br (Reserach Group´s international cooperation) www.ecocidades.uff.br (Research Group´s outreach community projects www.ecopoliticas.uff.br (Research Group main website) - Nucleo de Estudos em EcoPoliticas e EConsCiencias Department of Geoenvironmental Analysis - Institute of Geosciences Universidade Federal Fluminense Niteroi - RJ - Brazil Em 18/03/2016 05:21, notification@unteamworks.org escreveu:

In hindsight the process of arriving at an agreement on the SDGs looks relatively straightforward as we look to roll out the implementation phase! There is a universal acknowledgement of the basic principles of coordination, multi-sectorality and good governance that are critical for successful implementation; however the challenge lies in promoting a common understanding of the larger objective and the roles for different stakeholders at all levels: the need for individual and collective ownership. Above all ensuring the transparency and accountability necessary in the process to stay on course. What is perhaps a key issue then is to get a common understanding and agreement that the involvement of people from the grassroots, up and across, needs to be promoted. Some examples have already been provided that where such an involvement takes place success in achieving goals is guaranteed. The UN system needs to and is in a position to catalyze this process working with diffe! rent stakeholders.

Mainstreaming the SDGs into national development plans and integrating them also at the sub-national level requires an intensive process of prioritisation and in my view sequencing. This is particularly true in LDCs with limited resources, both human and capital. Various tools are available for this in addition to guidance on vertical and horizontal coherence of policy frameworks. This is not new and is the classic approach to planning for sustainable development; however in most cases we have had limited success as evidenced in the uneven progress on the MDGs, possibly due to inadequate practice of these fundamental principles. Further, to achieve appropriate mainstreaming, due diligence on priority setting is required: selecting indicators that together will facilitate achievement of a few priority goals needs to be a focused evidence based process rather than just being a broad based consultative process.  A ‘systems thinking’ approach is necessary to ach! ieve the integrated goals for sustainable and enduring development. There is need for improved synchronization in planning processes, both vertical and horizontal as well as rationalization of implementing structures at the national and sub national levels.

The foregoing also requires strong leadership, not only at the national and sub national level but also within the UN and within the private sector and civil society, including academia. In addition, we need to also have champions, who will guide, lead and exemplify multi-sectorality and integrated approaches that will leave no one behind. 

Abiodun Ogundipe (not verified)

Fighting corruption in all nations should not be main issue as it in Nigeria and other countries. There are other things that can facilitate progress for any nation. What is causing corruption is mismanagement of funds. If strategies are well mapped out for disbursement of cash in any nation there would not be corruption I think. All is lack of strategies by nations leaders. Abiodun Ogundipe Nigeria

Antonio Roque (not verified)

In the future world, we all care about each other, nations and people in a dynamic wheel of intelligently and strategically sharing each others burdens, the brotherhood of humanity in a gigantic wheel of affection and balance, no one shall be left behind due to the gravity of love and shared resources that are get technologically being acquired preserving the planet. Maybe reaching the point where everyone in the planet is entitled to a very small and basic monthly salary to guarantee minimum survival, continuity, spiritual and human evolution and economical activation, unlocking an intelligent growth engine, by sovereignty enforcement or donated funds. Poverty is everywhere in this planet in rich or poor countries.

Legal and technological systems can be used to channel diplomatic, security, political, institutional and business resolutions via the UN SDG and to achieve this we would need:

1. The self-government – freedom, spirituality, self-control, sense of duty, wisdom, openness and moral from citizens.

2. The local government-supportive to NGOs

3. The regional government-countries

4. The United Nations Parliamentary system of the people for earth, space and universal affairs, en.unpacampaign.org

5. The supporting NGOs from all over the world

6. The United nations organizations

7. The United Nations – for the nations

8. Supporting groups of countries by their status:

– G20

– Fragile state groups

– BRICS

– Commercial state groups

–         And others…

 

The UN with the SDG is able to ensure balanced policy coherence by diversity and understanding strategic country needs as a pickup for future progress and frame, each country and UN organisation with a specific studied case of integration of the SDG.

The United nations and each of the UN organisations would present and negotiate a designed program with each government under the SDG. What are the most important SDG to that country? How can we integrate the SDG in a win-win situation; key pickup points are important to value and integrate the SDG program.

The UN could also operate a quantum computer ex:www.dwavesys.com to analyse and monitor trade, data from several sources for example analysing the traffic of commodities like in a traffic light system, monitoring the progress of the SDG worldwide by all the sources etc… having more efficient view and transparency of what is happening.

 

Country integration should be done by jointly UN, UN organisations and governments work together side by side to understand the main key points of action and the main key SDG more important to that country; the country would nominate some body or person to lead the negotiations and create this joint project and study. Starting by a proposal from the UN. Probably the UN could have a representative in the parliament of that country.

Exchanging and communicating via a cloud platform with video, chat, messaging, documents exchange etc..

The program for the types of country would have to be deeply analyzed having all factors in case, economical development, levels of poverty, technological awareness, cultural and spiritual orientation, environmental and industrial progress etc…studies have to be made and global opinions have to be collected and final decisions with countries for joint project development to target local areas have to be made.

 

At local level the UN would have to have in reference the government to work with the local private and public organisations of the country, the NGOs and ECOSOC NGOS would be able to help and integrate as well and and this local organisations are the ones that should report progress directly to the UN with the government awareness.

All this can be done with joint government development and diplomacy, creating and integrating the needs of the country with SDG, getting reports and monitoring with local private-public organizations, creating awareness campaigns to the people and using technologically quantum computing power, cloud solutions and platforms

 

www.wapo-int.org

 

Dosse SOSSOUGA • Executive Director at UN SDGs NGO Major Group d'or Africa: Amis des Étrangers au Togo: ADET from Togo

L'implémentation nationale des ODD est simple:Il faut créer un Conseil national des ODD qui doit regrouper les membre du gouvernement, la société civile vraiment engagée dans les ODD, le système des Nations Unies et les autres groupes majeurs. Mais ce conseil ne doit pas être politisé. Ce conseil doit travailler avec les autres partenaires locales(autorités locales, les autorités nationales, les jeunes, les femmes, les personnes handicapées, les personnes âgées, les migrants, les peuples autochtones, les autres minoritées et sur la base des données statistiques. Le conseil national aura pour document de travail les ODD.

BNEIJARA (not verified)

Bonjour

 Les messages clés qui ressortent de toutes les contributions dans cette phase de concertation en ligne pour  la mise en œuvre des ODD sont les suivants : La mise en œuvre des ODD est un exercice politique qui exige un leadership de haut niveau (NU)aussi bien dans les organisations régionales  qu’au sein des gouvernements des pays, afin d’optimiser l’impact des interventions et leur conformité avec les principales priorités nationales selon une approche collective convenue qui puisse répondre aux spécificités des pays. Il est nécessaire d’être sensible aux priorités essentielles afin d’obtenir des résultats visibles et renforcer la confiance entre les différents acteurs. La bonne coordination  peut aider à sceller des engagements communs à ces priorités essentielles, mais cela  ne peut être efficace que si  les interventions sont assemblées. Pour réaliser de réels progrès sur le terrain. Les efforts visant à mettre en œuvre les ODD doivent passer d’un dialogue global à une action au niveau national. Cela suppose d’établir des objectifs clairs, l’élaboration de feuilles de route convenues pour la mise en œuvre, le suivi et l'évaluation conjointe  (examen) des risques et le suivi des progrès.

 

Les objectifs de consolidation doivent être mis en avant et à ce moment précis de de l’engagement mondial sur les ODD par la réalisation commune de la planification, du suivi, et donc d’une reddition de comptes mutuelle.

La mise en œuvre des ODD exige de mettre davantage l'accent sur un ensemble plus restreint de priorités, sur une compréhension commune des facteurs de faiblesse et de sources de résilience. La transparence de l'aide est une condition minimale pour forger des partenariats plus solides. La mise à jour des systèmes de gestion et d’information de l'aide publique au développement, doit obligatoirement être  intégrée dans les processus de planification et de budgétisation nationale et accompagnés d’efforts pour améliorer la gestion des finances publiques, la participation active des gouvernements,  des organisations de la société civile, des partenaires au développement NU devrait être une étape essentielle pour la propriété de l'Agenda 2030, sa mise en œuvre et ses résultats. Le développement des pays relève en premier lieu des gouvernements. Sans appropriation des ODD à la fois des gouvernements et de leur population les résultats ne seront jamais obtenus. Ces ODD ne pourront être atteints que par l’adoption de nouvelles stratégies et priorités politiques nationales. Confectionnés par la communauté internationale, ils doivent être assimilés par les gouvernements locaux oui ils ont signé et approuvé mais cela n’est pas suffisant une campagne de sensibilisation mondiale est nécessaire. La responsabilité première pour réaliser ces objectifs et les cibles revienne aux gouvernements des pays, tous les acteurs de la vie nationale doivent être impliqués. A travers les associations communautaires et professionnelles, les groupes de femmes et les organisations non gouvernementales, c’est la société civile dans son ensemble qui doit participer aux différentes étapes de la réalisation des ODD. 

Ruzanna Tarverdyan • Founding President at The Geneva Consensus Foundation

The economist as such does not advocate criteria of optimality. He may invent them. He may discuss their pros and cons, sometimes before but preferably after trying out their implications. But the ultimate choice is made…by the procedures of decision making inherent in the institutions, laws and customs of society. A wide range of professional competences enters into the preparation and deliberation of these decisions. To the extent that the economist takes part on this decisive phase, he does so in a double role, as economist, and a citizen of his polity: local polity, national polity or world Tjalling Koopmans, Nobel Memorial Lecture, 1975

Ruzanna Tarverdyan • Founding President at The Geneva Consensus Foundation

We submit that the solutions for Sustainable development in the interconnected Global world- two multiple dimensional phenomenon, entail a significant paradigm shift towards systems analysis and matrix thinking to address inter-temporal effectiveness-efficiency-equity challenges for future generations.

Hans Friederich (not verified)

Dear Moderator

INBAR has prepared the attached briefing notes for its 41 Member States to guide them in incorporating bamboo and rattan in their development plans for the future.  Bamboo and rattan are no solutions in isolation, but they should be included in the full spectrum of development options, as they can help achieve several SDGs.

Thank you for your attention

Nadya Dobretsova (not verified)

Key drivers of development in any country, including the Kyrgyz Republic - are the state, business and public sector. Sustainable development in the interests of people becomes the result of balanced and effective interaction of the mentioned three drivers. Moreover, each party must have clear goals, objectives, motives and mechanisms for participation in the development process. Each party must have clear understanding of each other’s roles and contributions to the development, which is impossible without a clear framework for cooperation and an enabling environment for operation of each of the parties with maximum efficiency. By 2016 the Kyrgyz Republic has a situation when the roles, contributions and enabling environment are formed only in respect of the state (to a greater extent) and business (to a lesser extent). The state establishes rules of the game, adopts laws, performs other functions understandable to everyone. The business produces values, creates jobs and pays taxes. With respect to the public sector and the most proactive part - civil society – there is no formed clear and meaningful vision of its role, contribution and favorable environment. Neither the state nor the business does not fully understand the role and objectives of the public sector, why its existence and level of development are not less important. At this stage it is meaningless to speak about the causes of this situation, it is wiser to take it as an evolutionary and objective reality and to address the challenge - to form the frameworks comprehensible to all parties for the contributions, roles and enabling environment for the public sector in order to ensure sustainable development of the Kyrgyz Republic taking into account the balanced contribution by the three leading drivers in the development. However, it requires much effort from the civil society itself - to create its contribution to sustainable development, find and publish indicators that demonstrate the accountability of civil society to its beneficiaries. Unfortunately, a common world practice on civil society accountability does not exist. That would be great to have a system to measure the contribution and accountability of the public sector.

Asela • from Sri Lanka

Interesting to see the e-discussion. Global Parliamentarians Forum for Evaluation (GPFE) https://globalparliamentarianforum.wordpress.com/ promotes National Evaluation Policies and systems at country level. GPFE works with parliamentarians, government representatives and VOPEs (Voluntary Organizations for Professional Evaluations) to promote enabling environment for evaluation including SDGs. We have conducted a global study on national evaluation policies and found out that only about 20 countries have formal NEPs. http://www.pfde.net/index.php/publications-resources/global-mapping-rep… Also we have documented case studies of NEPs from selected countries. http://www.pfde.net/index.php/publications-resources/2014-02-28-19-08-54 Also I would like to share the resource on "National evaluation policies for sustainable and equitable development" http://www.mymande.org/sites/default/files/files/NationalEvaluationPoli… In this year we have launched a webinar series called "Meet a parliamentarian" and also a video campaign with parliamentarians to promote evaluation of sustainable development https://parliamentariansforevaluationcampaign.wordpress.com/ Happy to share more on this platform. 

Peter Head (not verified)

My Charity The Ecological Sequestration Trust rently facilitated, with UNSDSN,2 high level workshops at Bellagio Rockefeller Centre to create a Roadmap 2030, an action plan for a smart partnership between national governments, municipal governments, private sector and communities to implement the SDG's and Sendai risk framework and outcome of COP21. This takes the form of a background description and then an action plan for collbaoratve action drawn from recommendations of around 80 current studies. It is effectively an integrated action plan for bringing public-private finance together for implementation.

The approach is an open-source online resource for everyone to use and if you could help facilitate comments we will update it over the next 2 months. It is designed also to help the Habitat III process.

The approach in the Roadmap will be demonstrated in Ghana and in the city of Accra,starting this year ,and Ghana is willing to help others to follow.Here is the link to the Roadmap 2030 which includes a downloadable PDF. 

http://ecosequestrust.org/roadmap-for-habitat-iii/

We are open to supporting demonstration in other countries and the hope is that each country will get a regional demonstrator going by 2018 and create a scaling RIIF fund for all regions of each country to be investing in SDG's to meet the 2030 deadline.

Francesca (not verified)

Dear all,

 

First of all I appreciate this e-discussion, a unique opportunity to the broader development community to provide critical policy guidance and recommendations for the implementation of the 2030 Agenda. It definitely leads the way to result-oriented actions.

 

The Foundation I work for has a focus on disability–inclusive development, extending its field of action beyond Italian boundaries, so we are particularly committed to implementing the disability-inclusive SDGs.

In this direction we promote Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR) projects at grassroots level in communities, promotes and strengthens local Disabled People Organisations (DPOs) in rural and isolated areas abroad, and monitors the implementation of CRPD at field level by collaborating with national CRPD monitoring systems.

 

Nationally, we consider the two listed below the most efficient tools so far to land the global agenda at national and sub-national level :

- The International Conference Including Disability “Development Cooperation: Experiences of collaboration between Governments, NGOs and DPOs” promoted by UNDESA

- The interaction with the National Observatory on the condition of persons with disabilities

 

So we are looking forward to and committed to create more best practice exchange occasions in a Sectoral and Cross-Institutional perspective.

 

We encourage the national UN office to replicate this e-discussion at a national level and persevere in its challenging approach/facilitator role to collect data and publish reports and statistics.

 

An analysis of the current national development strategies is the good foundation to implement the 2030 Agenda nationally!

 

GIULIANA VACA (not verified)

Para alcanzar como meta el desarrollo sostenible sin importar la capacidad económica de los gobiernos de los distintos países alrededor del mundo, es fundamental empoderar a los jóvenes en cuanto al desarrollo de proyectos.

Es importante que los jóvenes profesionales de las muchas carreras que se ofrecen a nivel unversitario desarrollen proyectos sociales que involucren a jóvenes menos afortunados en ideas que colaboren a cambiar la visión económica hacia el desarrollo de fuentes alternativas de empleo, que sean viables y sostenibles a nivel económico, social y ambiental.

Los proyectos que se realicen deberán ser dirigidos a trabajar en los tres niveles antes mencionados de manera simultánea y sería un éxito si se cuenta con el apoyo de municipalidades y otros niveles de gobierno o de organizaciones nacionales e internacionales.

Por ejemplo: Un grupo de jóvenes universitarios, asesorados por sus maestros podrían desarrollar un proyecto de reciclaje de materiales en una comunidad, para ello buscarán establecer conexiones entre empresas y jóvenes de la comunidad que se empleen en el proyecto y que logren establecer comercio con las empresas; con ello, se trabaja en el ámbito del desarrollo social pues se emplea a jóvenes de la comunidad, se desenvuelve el aspecto ecónómico pues se emprende comercio entre empresas y comunidad; y en lo ambiental, pues se gestionan los residuos de mejor manera. 

Cada región del mundo tiene una realidad distinta y problemas enfocados a diferentes sectores, y de acuerdo a dichas realidades los proyectos deben enfocarse en cubrir las necesidades existentes y de esta manera unir la brecha entre los ámbitos socioeconómico y ambiental. 

Apoyo a las opiniones del resto de participantes en el foro en cuanto que el sistema económico mundial limita la igualdad de los sectores de la población mundial y pienso que las estrategias que se den en la Agenda 30 deben ser acciones plasmadas y no solamente palabras sueltas.

Dr. Abdulghany Mohamed • from Canada

On Youth Leadership and Engagement

Dear Moderators,

First of all, thank you very much for the summaries and remarks.

I would like to build on your contributions and participants’ inputs by focusing on and re-emphasizing the need to meaningfully engage the youth in implementing the SDGs. As an educator, an ex-youth myself, (i.e., age-wise! although still young at heart) and development practitioner I believe in the positive role youth can play and have indeed contributed to development endeavours. Specifically, I would like to suggest that the UN system (among others) endeavour to impress upon national leaders to initiate/institute regular (e.g, semi-annually) broad-based and widely/geographically distributed/organized youth leadership training/coaching (at local national and international levels) in planning, implementing and evaluating SDG-centred projects/programs as well as in ethics, community outreach, coalition building and teamwork, entrepreneurship, creativity and innovation (both social and economic/business).

Moreover, I believe that support for such an endeavour (by national and local leaders/organizations coupled with intellectual/moral/financial resources (e.g., from the bodiew such as ILO, World Bank, WHO, UNICEF, UNESCO, UNDP, EU, etc) would go a long way in ensuring that our youth are productively/fruitfully engaged – presently and in the future to come.

Thanks again to all for you invaluable contributions.

Sincerely,

Dr. Abdulghany Mohamed

Gabi Spitz (not verified)

Dear Pedro, thank you for moderating this discussion on the national implementation of the SDGs. It is a very rich discussion in which many interesting points have been raised. As you request concrete experiences and examples, I would like to share some from the Netherlands. At Kaleidos Research, research institute for global issues, we have just published two studies on the implementation of the SDGs in the Netherlands. The first explores the role of Dutch CSOs and the second focuses on the localization of the SDGs through local governments. A third study, on the role of the private sector (in particular SMEs) will be published in April.

 

Below are some of the most relevant findings on the role of Dutch CSOs and Local Governments in relation to the nationale implementation of the SDGs. I hope they can be useful for others working on the inclusive national implementation of the Agenda2030.

 

Current state of implementation

Similar to most other European countries, there is no formal implementation framework or a ‘national strategy’ in the Netherlands yet. Efforts have been put in place to take stock of existing frameworks and policies that could be aligned with the SDGs. A clear example is the analyses of policy targets in the field of the environmental SDGs, executed by PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency. Netherlands Statistics (CBS) has explored how the new agenda could be monitored and plays an active role in the international process of developing indicators for the SDGs.

At the national level, a SDG ambassador and SDG coordinator were appointed, as well as focal points within various ministries in order to stimulate involvement of various ministries and to increase policy coherence. In this exploratory phase the Ministry of Foreign Affairs has been leading.

 

The roles of CSOs and Local governments

The research finds that both CSOs and LAs see several roles for themselves. Local governments mostly expect to contribute to the implementation of the SDGs as facilitator, by leading by example (in own policies and abroad) and as communicator (towards specific relevant groups, not the community at large). CSOs mostly see their role as watchdogs, carrying out relevant activities abroad and working in partnership with other stakeholders.

 

It should be mentioned, that both the national government as well as local governments and CSOs do not seem to embrace a top down approach that imposes a centralized strategy onto stakeholders. This reflect general developments in the Netherlands, where the national government is pulling back in many (social) areas; leaving more to civil society actors. As the SDGs are an agenda for all stakeholders, it seems that relevant stakeholders are now also getting quite some room to take incentive on the SDGs.

 

Nevertheless, in the exploration of their own roles, CSOs and LAs do voice the need for more clarity about the role of the government. Not only because they feel that the Netherlands should follow-up on their commitments to the Agenda2030, but also to determine their own roles in the implementation process. Furthermore, many stakeholders indicate that the SDGs are still mostly an agenda of the development sector and that, for the success of the SDGs, it will be crucial to also get the environmental sector on board. Other challenges that both CSOs and local governments face is a lack of funds for activities on the SDGs. The research also shows that leadership on the agenda from the national government as well as EU institutions, is needed to strengthen local support and legitimacy for the implementation of the SDGs. 

 

Good examples

In the Netherlands, several initiatives have been set up in which CSOs, local governments and/or the private sector are engaged. These include the Global Goals Charter; a multi-stakeholder initiative which was signed by over 70 Dutch organizations. The charter was already set up before the adoption of the SDGs and aims at developing and strengthening multi stakeholder partnerships for specific SDGs. A partnership on health has been set up dedicated to contribute towards SDG 3. Another partnership that is being developed focuses on Human Cities: SDG 11.

 

A broad consortium of public and private parties is also working together to develop a Dutch global goals website that brings together all Dutch initiatives and news on the SDGs. (Participating organisations include the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, multi-media platform OneWorld, the international cooperation agency of the Association of Netherlands Municipalities (VNG International), Partos, the Global Goals Charter, Earth Charter Nederland, Global Compact Netherlands and employer’s organisation VNO/NCW.) Besides a website, they are also organizing a series of public debates to raise awareness on the SDGs.

 

There are some other activities in which especially CSOs and LAs and their umbrella organisations Partos (for CSOs) and VNG international (for LAs) are taking the lead, which might encourage the engagement of other actors as well. Examples are the CSO-initiative “Ready for Change “(that focuses on coherence and the SDGs) and the global goals municipality campaign (an initiative of VNG International, the International Cooperation Agency of the Association of Netherlands Municipalities).

More information can be found in the attached discussion papers. 

Yogesh Sharma (not verified)

Nothing and no policy can be implemented successfully if its not accepted whole heartedly by all the stake holders involved. The plicies shoud be made clear to all the authoriteis involded. They should also be shared with citizens.

The stakeholders should be assured safety, security and all help and assistance needed. The leaders and politicians need to set aside their personal differences and issues. National and Global progress should occupy the major place. 

The policies do not also see the success that they deserve and the hope that they are implemented is that they need to regularly audited and required changes should be made.

Lack of basic educationis one key issue people dont understand and accept the policies. Education to all is still only a dream. Basic education has to reach every single child on the planet.

Yogesh Sharma

President, Human Rights Sanrakshan Sansthaa

India

 

 

 

Olga Saet (not verified)

Dear all,

Thank you for a very interesting discussion and the opportunity to contribute to it.

I would like to share some experience from Belarus on SDGs localization.

In October 2015, the UN in Belarus undertook a global best practice on rolling out and localizing the SDGs through the #UN70BelarusExpress. The unprecedented Initiative started in Minsk, where the President planted a Tree of Peace and Sustainable Development, mirroring the Belarus-led event held at the UN Headquarters in New York where the tree of Peace and Unity was planted. The day continued with the signing ceremony of the UNDAF, followed by the opening of a historical exhibition about 70 years of partnership between the UN and Belarus, and the departure of the UN Train. The train travelled to every Oblast (district of the country) bringing together more than 150,000 participants from 40 countries, including senior Government officials, parliamentarians, all the regional governors, 100 NGOs, 25 private sector partners, 30 embassies, students, journalists, religious leaders from all faiths, representatives of vulnerable groups, UN Goodwill Ambassadors and more than 250 staff from 12 UN agencies including regional directors and the SG’s Youth Envoy through more than 250 activities in 8 days.

The #UN70BelarusExpress for SDGS resulted in unprecedented visibility for the UN across Belarus and beyond (280 articles in international and national media; 75,500 reached on Facebook and 3,000 Tweets and retweets); multi-stakeholder SDG plans being developed nationally as well as commitments in each province of the country; numerous new partnerships in each region; and several resource mobilization opportunities from bilateral donors and private sector.

The UN in Belarus also organized a high impact advocacy campaign #InslusiveBelarus SDGs 4 All aimed at fighting stigma, raising awareness and empowering vulnerable groups. A 28 - day initiative was focused on the issues related to gender equality and domestic violence, HIV/AIDS, disability, migrants and refugees, youth and children. Within the campaign a 10-day Human Rights Film Festival and exhibition dedicated to human rights was  organized by the UN in partnership with 15 countries, Government and NGOs. The campaign touched the hearts and minds of thousands of people directly, while countless others were reached through media. This year we will bring #InclusiveBelarus SDGs 4 All at the local level through a large-scale regional campaign. A special emphasis will be placed on reaching the marginalized population, such as the poor, youth, senior citizens, women, people living with HIV, people with disabilities, refugees and migrants.

Capitalizing on the success of the #UN70BelarusExpress and #InclusiveBelarus, the UN developed a joint strategy to support the implementation of the 2030 Agenda – the 5 “A” Approach:

  1. Analysis of the national policies in order to evaluate the level of integration of SDG targets and indicators, identify data gaps in terms of integration and create a mapping of “excluded” targets and indicators.
  2. Awareness building aimed at achieving a similar level of understanding of the SDGs among different stakeholders and the UN Agencies.
  3. Advocacy on the new development agenda targeted at donors, Government and private sector through provision of evidence related to needs and efficient policies, as well as criteria of effective technical assistance.
  4. Application of the analytical data to the National Development Strategy 2030, national and regional Plans, the UNDAF, the new Country Programme Documents of UNDP, UNICEF, UNFPA.
  5. Accountability to ensure that citizens and all the national stakeholders have access to relevant information; and can provide feedback and influence the process of SDGs implementation; establishing a robust and transparent monitoring and reporting mechanism.
Sylvia Briggs (not verified)

Successful implementation of the 2030 agenda at the National and sub-national levels requires legislation considerations and actions to support the process.

This involves (among others):

  • Ammendments to a number of existing laws that are critical to the actualization of this 'bold' ambition.
  • Passage of pending legislations that are aligned to this global agenda at the National and sub-national levels.
  • Consideration and enactment of new legislation to directly enable the implementation of the SDGs. 

This calls for sensitization on the domestication of the 2030 agenda and innovative advocacy strategies for legislation considerations and actions to support the implementation. 

Priya Kanayson (not verified)

Effective implementation and the achievement of the SDGs and targets rests on the ability to monitor and review commitments and hold governments accountable, and the ability of governments to adapt the global goals and targets to fit their national context. At the forefront of this is the need for governments to adapt the SDGs with an integrated, ‘whole of government,’ approach. The interlinked and indivisible nature of the SDGs necessitates inter- and intrasectoral cooperation to develop comprehensive national strategies. It is important to note that adapting the SDGs to national contexts is not an allowance to prioritise the SDGs or treat the 169 goals as a menu of options. Governments must make progress towards all 169 targets, but in some countries, certain goals and targets must be acted on and progress made before others can be achieved. Good practice examples of platforms for multisectoral collaboration should be made available for Member States to adapt to their own unique contexts, for example in a designated online repository.

Capitalising on existing structures and mechanisms will help governments implement the Agenda, and to utilise existing untapped synergies. Multistakeholder and multisectoral partnerships and involvement is crucial for successful national implementation of the Agenda. As exemplified by the HIV/AIDS response during the MDGs, strengthening civil society and empowering communities are fundamental strategies to reducing inequities, improving prevention and treatment, and delivering results. Non-communicable diseases particularly require a whole-of-society approach to support health-promoting environments, as well as empowered community systems, civil society and patient networks to act as stewards and engines of change. Fundamental to this is the meaningful engagement of civil society in policy-making, decision-making and the implementation and monitoring of services.

BNEIJARA (not verified)

La mise en œuvre efficace et la réalisation des ODD et desobjectifs repose sur la capacité de surveiller et d'examen des engagements ettenir les gouvernements responsables, et la capacité des gouvernements à adapterles buts et objectifs mondiaux en fonction de leur contexte national. Poursoutenir le développement des pays africains il faut une transformationéconomique et structurelle, des innovations technologies, un développementhumain, des financements et de partenariats nationaux (Sud-Sud). Cela est d’autantvrai que tant que le gouvernement croit que les partenaires sont une tutelle etnon un appui le développement ne sera le problème de personne. Personne n’estLead…………. Dans notre pays la Mauritanieaucune structure inclusive ou mécanisme n’existent  pour aider  le gouvernement à mettre en œuvre des ODD. Lemanque de et de synergie constitue un un handicap majeur.

Si aujourd’hui  lerenforcement de la société civile et l'autonomisation des communautés sont desstratégies fondamentales pour réduire les inégalités cela n’est pas applicabledans notre pays ou les communautés et la SC ne sont la préoccupation depersonne.

2016-03-25 15:10 GMT+00:00 <notification@unteamworks.org>:

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S ann • from United States

Dear Pedro and Colleagues:

Implementation of environmental laws concerns both domestic and the international community.   All nations are responsible for the global activities that contribute to global warming, climate change, and other man-made environmental hazards.  The environment can no longer be neglected and ignored; saving and protecting the environment must be considered a priority to all nations.

International treaties shape national legislation with the intent of implementation. Due to the inaction of Member States, it is incumbent upon the United Nations to take a proactive approach by holding Member States accountable for their failure to implement environmental laws whether they are signators of treaties or not.  Member States’ failure to implement such laws adversely impact the whole international community.

Governments must be mandated to implement precautionary and sustainable development measures, to include requiring corporations and businesses to submit environmental impact assessments for licensing certifications and periodic reviews to ensure environmental protection.  Voluntary commitments are the best practices in implementing environmental laws.  The value of the commitments is significant to trade and investment relationships as the environment improves.  Implementation of environmental laws not only improves the environment; it is good for business.

Governments must also be required to make full disclosures through transparency, informing the public of environmental activities that may adversely impact the environment at all levels (local, national, regional, and international).   People have a right to know.    In addition, more funding is needed for research and education.   Education is very critical to the implementation process, as people must be educated in changing the way they live to reduce further harm to the environment.

I would like to add, my initial response above  speaks from an environmental stance, which five of the SDGs directly relate to.  The SDGs are quite ambitious and overlap with existing initiatives, agreements and treaties.  It would be more effective to link the goals/targets with existing initiatives, agreements and treaties.  Additionally, since the SDGs are not legally binding, without such mandate it is pretty much business as usual, except for the nations who are truly committed.  Another recommendation is for the UNDP to identify Member States who have actually implemented the goals and targets and share their strategies and results.

Renata Aquino Ribeiro (not verified)

Hello!

As a follow up to this discussion, it is important to acknowledge that national represention does have to be inserted in the larger context of international actions. A country may be representing itself as diverse and interested in the SDGs in international venues but its national leaderships in the organizations do not really translate these objectives into actions.

For a higher rate of success of national implementations, therefore, a continuous and broad dialogue between national organizations and international initiatives must happen. Criteria in national leadership must align with those of international initiatives, bringing in aspects such as gender diversity in leadership.

Only then and if then it is possible to consider national implementation successful, if the bridge remains with international initiatives and practice is modeled in fairness.

 

All the best

 

Renata

Roberto Borrero (not verified)

Initiatives to mainstream the SDGs into relevant national sustainable development policies and programmes should emphasize multi-stakeholder partnerships that facilitate full, effective, and meaningful participation of all stakeholders, including Indigenous Peoples, in planning, implementation, and evaluation processes. In States where Indigenous Peoples make up a small minority, for example, it maybe tempting for policy makers to marginalize them as Governments at the national level could choose to develop programs aimed at larger groups to improve their national level results. 

 

With this in mind, a human rights based approach promoting universality and inalienability; indivisibility; inter-dependence and inter-relatedness; non-discrimination and equality; participation and inclusion; accountability and the rule of law is critical to moving these processes forward if the theme “leaving no one behind” is a priority. Additionally, in relation to Indigenous Peoples, SDG implementation and monitoring at the national level should be guided by indigenous peoples’ human rights, as enshrined in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and multiple other human rights instruments. For proper monitoring, rights related indicators and disaggregated data are critical.

 

It is important to note that while Indigenous Peoples are only specifically mentioned in two of the SDG targets, there is a huge potential to advance indigenous peoples’ rights through the SDGs – and to use UNDRIP and  other human rights instruments to guide SDG implementation and monitoring.

The adoption of indicators relevant for indigenous peoples under the 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda also has the potential to enable and support important community-based monitoring work by indigenous peoples relating to self-determination and sustainable development. Multiple sources of data from complementary monitoring systems, must underpin the evidence base needed for robust and participatory monitoring of the SDGs. Through the use of indicators relevant for indigenous peoples, a genuine partnership amongst United Nation agencies, governments and indigenous peoples can be forged, towards realizing respect and progressive realization of human rights for all, and ensuring no one is left behind.

Maik Duennbier (not verified)

Thank you for the opportunity to contribute to this E-discussion.

It's a privilege for me to share some input on behalf of IOGT International.

Concerning question 3: What steps are necessary to ensure that all stakeholders, including the government, private sector and civil society can readily exchange information and experiences? How can "peer exchange" be established and nurtured?

When engaging with the private sector, for the benfit of achieving the Agenda 2030, it is absolutely critical that governments safeguard against and try to eliminate conflicts of interest. Surely, the private sector has a role to play concerning some of the SDGs. But concerning other SDGs, like Goal 3, the presence of conflict of interest should mean that governments safeguard against undue influence of the private sector, to keep the integrity of the Agenda 2030 intact.

For example, the alcohol industry does not have a role to play in achieving the Agenda 2030 because as producers of alcohol, as marketers of their products, and as aggressive lobbyists to protect their business and their shareholders' interests, the alcohol industry has a fundamental conflict of interest. Sustainable development is dependent on the reduction of alcohol consumption, for alcohol harm to decrease; sustainable development is dependent on preventing an uptake of alcohol use in (for instance) Sub-saharan Africa or India - where the alcohol industry is doing everything they can to establish their brands, even if it means to target children and youth with advertising.

The alcohol industry is just one example for private sector and their affiliates being at odds with the spirit and the vision of the Agenda 2030. Steps are necessary to protect the UN in general and the Agenda 2030 from undue influence and conflict of interest with regard to corporate involvement.

GEORGES RADJOU (not verified)

Friends,

Please find a new document on the national implemenation attached. it is looking at Post 2015 SDG and national implementation barriers and opportunities trough the lens of Growth and the natural environment and the ownership of ecology through the lens of power and centralism versus people participation. Read more in the document. Thanks,

Georges  BIRD

 

NZOBONANKIRA Salvator (not verified)

The current El Nino event in Burundi has proven the vulnerability of the country to climate change. Natural disasters have caused ahuge amount of destructions including crops and shelter, which is likely to intail famine. The national platform and the Red Cross have taken action but have been unable to meet all the needs. It's actually obvious that the community needs to be fully aware of DRM and CCA through sensitization and education. The Red Cross Society has already had an experience building capacity in the field and setting up local DRR committees but still finds it difficult to make a full coverage of the territory. It is a agency present in all district subdivisions of the country which is an important opportunity. The process is under way but there's need for support.

 

Coalition of Civil Society Organizations in the Central Afri (not verified)

The Central African Region is considered one of the richest in the world in terms of natural resources like Tantalum used for Mobile phones, Tin, Tungsten, Gold, Diamond, Crude Oil, Cocoa, Coffee, Cotton, Timber,  Ivory are among the resources from the region. The region speaks four International languages including English, French, Spanish, and Portuguese and over 1000 national languages.

It houses the Congo Basin Rainforest, the second largest Rainforest in the world after the Amazon. It boarders the Coast of the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Guinea among its resources.  There exist small island states, Sao Tome and Principe and Fernandopo. On the contrary the region remains the poorest in the world with a family earning less than 1US $ per day compared. The region has the longest serving presidents in the world bringing into reality human rights and democracy challenges,  conflicts and corruption, crime and child soldier, outward migration, insecurity,  poverty and hunger, unsustainable management of these and forests and seas resources.

The Coalition intends to increase Civil Society participation in the smooth implementation and realisation of the Sustainable Development Goals Agenda 2030 and beyond within all the countries in the Central African region impacting directly more than 200 Million Families and communities.

The Coalition also intends to increase the effective implemetation of the 2030 Agenda vis a vis Governemnet on human rights and democracy challenges,  conflicts and corruption, crime and child soldier, outward migration, insecurity,  poverty and hunger,  management of these and forests and seas resources.

 

Climate Change and Food security is equally very fundamental in the region.